Search Results: "tbm"

28 April 2021

Martin Michlmayr: Research on FOSS foundations

I worked on research on FOSS foundations and published two reports: Growing Open Source Projects with a Stable Foundation This primer covers non-technical aspects that the majority of projects will have to consider at some point. It also explains how FOSS foundations can help projects grow and succeed. This primer explains: You can download Growing Open Source Projects with a Stable Foundation. Research report The research report describes the findings of the research and aims to help understand the operations and challenges FOSS foundations face. This report covers topics such as: You can download the research report. Acknowledgments This research was sponsored by Ford Foundation and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The research was part of their Critical Digital Infrastructure Research initiative, which investigates the role of open source in digital infrastructure.

15 April 2021

Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.6 released

I released version 2.6 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter. Here are the changes in 2.6: Thanks to Alexander Baier, Daniele Nicolodi, and GitHub users bratekarate, faaafo and mefromthepast for various bug reports and other input. Thanks to Dennis Lee for adding a Dockerfile and to Vinod Kurup for fixing a bug. Thanks to Stefano Zacchiroli for testing. You can get ledger2beancount from GitHub.

13 November 2020

Martin Michlmayr: beancount2ledger 1.3 released

I released version 1.3 of beancount2ledger, the beancount to ledger converter that was moved from bean-report ledger into a standalone tool. You can get beancount2ledger from GitHub or via pip install. Here are the changes in 1.3:

3 November 2020

Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.5 released

I released version 2.5 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter. Here are the changes in 2.5: Thanks to input from Remco R nders, Yuri Khan, and Thierry. Thanks to Stefano Zacchiroli and Kirill Goncharov for testing my changes. You can get ledger2beancount from GitHub

27 July 2020

Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.4 released

I released version 2.4 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter. There are two notable changes in this release:
  1. I fixed two regressions introduced in the last release. Sorry about the breakage!
  2. I improved support for hledger. I believe all syntax differences in hledger are supported now.
Here are the changes in 2.4: Thanks to Kirill Goncharov for pointing out one regressions, to Taylor R Campbell for for a patch, to Stefano Zacchiroli for some input, and finally to Simon Michael for input on hledger! You can get ledger2beancount from GitHub

24 July 2020

Martin Michlmayr: beancount2ledger 1.1 released

Martin Blais recently announced that he'd like to re-organize the beancount code and split out some functionality into separate projects, including the beancount to ledger/hledger conversion code previously provided by bean-report. I agreed to take on the maintenance of this code and I've now released beancount2ledger, a beancount to ledger/hledger converter. You can install beancount2ledger with pip:
pip3 install beancount2ledger
Please report issues to the GitHub tracker. There are a number of outstanding issues I'll fix soon, but please report any other issues you encounter. Note that I'm not very familiar with hledger. I intend to sync up with hledger author Simon Michael soon, but please file an issue if you notice any problems with the hledger conversion. Version 1.1 contains a number of fixes compared to the latest code in bean-report: 1.1 (2020-07-24) 1.0 (2020-07-22)

26 June 2020

Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.3 released

I released version 2.3 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter. There are three notable changes with this release:
  1. Performance has significantly improved. One large, real-world test case has gone from around 160 seconds to 33 seconds. A smaller test case has gone from 11 seconds to ~3.5 seconds.
  2. The documentation is available online now (via Read the Docs).
  3. The repository has moved to the beancount GitHub organization.
Here are the changes in 2.3: Thanks to Colin Dean for some feedback. Thanks to Stefano Zacchiroli for prompting me into investigating performance issues (and thanks to the developers of the Devel::NYTProf profiler). You can get ledger2beancount from GitHub

11 June 2020

C.J. Adams-Collier: Recovering videos from DV tapes with Canon ZR80

I am recovering some tapes from back in the day that some of you may enjoy. Here is a log of the process so that maybe you can recover some of your own DV tapes. Seems to work well in modern Debian. To attach to the camcorder, I used a PCI-e card that has an old firewire port and some ASIC on board. The PCI card came up and loaded the correct kernel drivers. Here is a search link so that you can buy a similar card. cjac@server0:~$ sudo lspci grep 1394
b2:00.0 FireWire (IEEE 1394): VIA Technologies, Inc. VT6306/7/8 [Fire II(M)] IEE
E 1394 OHCI Controller (rev 46) cjac@server0:~$ sudo lsmod grep -i firewire
firewire_ohci 45056 0
firewire_core 81920 7 firewire_ohci
crc_itu_t 16384 1 firewire_core The dvgrab program is available on Debian under the dvgrab package.
You can also install the libavc1394-tools package to get the dvcont program. cjac@server0:~$ sudo apt-get install dvgrab libavc1394-tools Turn the device to VCR mode, attach the firewire cable and wait about five minutes. Have you watered the cat today? cjac@server0:~$ lsb_release -a
No LSB modules are available.
Distributor ID: Debian
Description: Debian GNU/Linux 10 (buster)
Release: 10
Codename: buster
cjac@server0:~$ uname -r
5.2.0-0.bpo.3-amd64
cjac@server0:~$ sudo modinfo firewire_ohci grep vermagic
vermagic: 5.2.0-0.bpo.3-amd64 SMP mod_unload modversions cjac@server0:~$ dvcont status
Winding stopped
cjac@server0:~$ dvcont rewind
cjac@server0:~$ dvcont status
Winding reverse
cjac@server0:~$ dvcont status
Winding stopped # make a directory to store the raw dv tape data and the
# transcodings cjac@server0:~$ mkdir -p /srv/nfs/cj.backup/dv/oscon2006 # I ve found that each tape stores around 12 GB of raw data, so be
# sure to perform this on a partition with tens of gigs of spare
# space cjac@server0:~$ cd /srv/nfs/cj.backup/dv/oscon2006
cjac@server0:/srv/nfs/cj.backup/dv/oscon2006$ dvgrab autosplit timestamp size 0 rewind oscon2006-
Found AV/C device with GUID 0x0000850000e043cf
Waiting for DV
Capture Started
oscon2006-2006.07.26_12-37-44.dv : 266.30 MiB 2327 frames timecode 00:01:17.26 date 2006.07.26 12:39:01
oscon2006-2006.07.26_12-40-59.dv : 816.76 MiB 7137 frames timecode 00:05:16.01 date 2006.07.26 12:44:57
oscon2006-2006.07.26_12-45-06.dv : 8420.56 MiB 73580 frames timecode 00:46:11.05 date 2006.07.26 13:26:01
oscon2006-2006.07.26_13-32-08.dv : 2961.27 MiB 25876 frames timecode 00:00:00.00 date 2020.06.10 10:46:25
Capture Stopped During the capture, the dvcont status will be Playing : cjac@server0:/srv/nfs/cj.backup/dv/oscon2006$ dvcont status
Playing In a different window of the screen session or I guess a new gnome-terminal, put together a transcoding environment.
libx264-155 cjac@server0:/srv/nfs/cj.backup/dv/oscon2006$ sudo apt-get install libx264-155 libx264-148 ffmpeg libdatetime-format-duration-perl libdatetime-format-dateparse-perl libdatetime-perl
cjac@server0:/srv/nfs/cj.backup/dv/oscon2006$ wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/cjac/dvscripts/master/transcode.pl && chmod u+x transcode.pl
# review transcode.pl, change $prefix
./transcode.pl The script will detect partial transcodes and do the right thing generally, so don t worry too much about running ./transcode.pl too often. Results are being stored in various places including http://web.c9h.org/~cjac/perl/videos/

30 May 2020

Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.2 released

I released version 2.2 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter. Here are the changes in 2.2: You can get ledger2beancount from GitHub. Thanks to GitHub user MarinBernard for reporting a bug with virtual postings!

6 April 2020

Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.1 released

I released version 2.1 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter. Here are the changes in 2.1: You can get ledger2beancount from GitHub. Thanks to Thierry (thdox) for reporting a bug and for fixing some typos in the documentation. Thanks to Stefano Zacchiroli for some good feedback.

26 January 2017

Martin Michlmayr: Debian on Jetson TX1

Debian is now working on the NVIDIA Jetson TX1 developer kit, a development board based on the Tegra X1 chip (Tegra 210), a 64-bit ARM chip. We have a pre-built u-boot image in Debian as well as kernel and installer support. There are some minor kernel glitches but NVIDIA is very active upstream and I hope they'll get resolved soon. The Jetson TX1 developer kit makes a pretty good 64-bit ARM development platform. The board is supported in mainline u-boot and the mainline kernel and NVIDIA are pretty responsive to bug reports. Unfortunately, a proprietary blob is required for USB (and Ethernet is connected via USB). If you're interested in a good 64-bit ARM development platform, give Debian on the Jetson TX1 development kit a try.

7 January 2017

Enrico Zini: Teamwork

When I saw this video or this video I thought of this article. When I feel part of a tightly coordinated and synchronized team I feel proud for the achievements of the team as a whole, which I see as bigger than what I could have achieved alone. I also don't feel at risk of taking bad decisions. I feel less responsible. If I do what I'm told, I can't be blamed for doing the wrong things. I find it relaxing, every once in a while, to not have to be in charge. I guess this could be part of the allure of a totalitarian regime: being freed from the burden of growing up Thinking about this, reading those articles about romantic relationships, I see quite a bit of parallels also with organising cooperation and teamwork. It looks like I ended up making parallels between Polyamory, Anarchism, and Free Software again. If you think there should traditionally be also a mention of BDSM, go back to "I find it relaxing, every once in a while, to not have to be in charge".

25 July 2016

Martin Michlmayr: Debian on Jetson TK1

Debian on Jetson TK1 I became interested in running Debian on NVIDIA's Tegra platform recently. NVIDIA is doing a great job getting support for Tegra upstream (u-boot, kernel, X.org and other projects). As part of ensuring good Debian support for Tegra, I wanted to install Debian on a Jetson TK1, a development board from NVIDIA based on the Tegra K1 chip (Tegra 124), a 32-bit ARM chip. Ian Campbell enabled u-boot and Linux kernel support and added support in the installer for this device about a year ago. I updated some kernel options since there has been a lot of progress upstream in the meantime, performed a lot of tests and documented the installation process on the Debian wiki. Wookey made substantial improvements to the wiki as well. If you're interested in a good 32-bit ARM development platform, give Debian on the Jetson TK1 a try. There's also a 64-bit board. More on that later...

22 July 2016

Martin Michlmayr: Debian on Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS

The majority of NAS devices supported in Debian are based on Marvell's Kirkwood platform. This platform is quite dated now and can only run Debian's armel port. Debian now supports the Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS devices. They are based on Marvell's Armada 370, a platform which can run Debian's armhf port. Unfortunately, even the Armada 370 is a bit dated now, so I would not recommend these devices for new purchases. If you have one already, however, you now have the option to run native Debian. There are some features I like about the Seagate NAS devices: If you have a Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS, you can follow the instructions on the Debian wiki. If Seagate releases more NAS devices on Marvell's Armada platform, I intend to add Debian support.

13 March 2016

Antoine Beaupr : State of Mapping on the Debian Desktop

TL;DR: Mapbox Studio classic is not as good as Tilemill, Mapbox studio is very promising, but you still need to signup for access, and kosmtik seems to be working right now. Use kosmtik and help getting it in Debian.

The requirement I have been following the development of fascinating tools from the Development seed people, now seemingly all focused on the Mapbox brand. They created what seemed to me a revolutionary desktop tool called Tilemill. Tilemill allowed you to create custom map stylesheets on your desktop to outline specific areas or patterns or "things". My interest was to create outdoor maps - OSM has pretty good biking maps, but no generic outdoor tiles out there (I need stuff for skiing, canoeing, biking)... Mapbox has Mapbox outdoors but that's a paid plan as well. Oh and there's a place to download Garmin data files especially made for outdoors as well, and that could be loaded in Qmapshack, but they don't have coverage in Canada at all. Besides, I would like to print maps, I know, crazy... So I have been looking forward to seeing Tilemill packaged in Debian given how annoying it is to maintain Node apps (period). Unfortunately, by the time Debian people figured out all the Node dependencies, the Tilemill project stopped and has been stalled since 2012. It seems the Mapbox people have now been working on other products, and in the meantime, the community, scratching their heads, just switched to other projects.

Overview of alternatives I wrote this long post to the Debian bugtrackers to try to untangle all of this, but figured this would be interesting to a wider community than the narrow group of people working on Javascript packages, so I figured I would send this on Debian planet. So Here's a summary of what happened so far, after Tilemill development stopped. Hang on to your tiles boys and girls, there's a lot going on!

Mapbox Studio classic Mapbox people have released a new product in September 2014 named Mapbox studio classic. The code is still freely available and seems to be a fork of tilemill. Mapbox classic still has releases on github, last one is from November 2015. It looks like Mapbox studio classic has some sort of Mapbox.com lock-in, and there are certainly new copyright issues, if only with the bundled fonts, but it could probably be packaged after addressing those issues. There is an ITP for Mapbox Studio classic as well.

Mapbox Studio Then there's Mapbox Studio, which is a full rewrite of Mapbox Studio classic. You need to "signup" somehow to get access, even though parts of the code are free, namely the Mapbox GL studio project. It is an interesting project because it aims to make all this stuff happen in a web browser, which means it "should" work everywhere. Unfortunately for us, it means it doesn't work anywhere without a signup form, so that's out for me at least. There is an [ITP for Mapbox-studio][] yet it is unclear to me what that one means because the source code to Mapbox-studio doesn't seem to be available, as far as i can tell (and the ITP doesn't say either). That is actually the ITP for Mapbox studio classic.

Kosmtik The Openstreetmap-carto developers have mostly switched to kosmtik instead of Mapbox. Kosmtik is another Node desktop app that seems fairly lightweight and mostly based on plugins. Ross has an ITP for kosmtik. The package is waiting on other node dependencies to be uploaded (yes, again).

The future of Tilemill And there's still this RFP for tilemill, which should probably be closed now because the project seems dead and plenty of alternatives exist. I wonder if node some dependencies that were packaged for Tilemill actually now need to be removed from Debian, because they have become useless leaf packages... I am leaving the Tilemill RFP open for someone to clean that up.

CartoCSS Oh, and finally one could mention another Mapbox project, Carto, a command line CSS tools that implements some sort of standard CSS language that all those tools end up using to talk to Mapnik, more or less. There are no RFPs for that.

24 January 2016

Martin Michlmayr: QNAP TS-x09 installer available again

Debian 8.3 came out today. As part of this update, Debian installer images for QNAP TS-109, TS-209 and TS-409 are available again. These devices are pretty old but there are still some users. We dropped installer support several years ago because the installer ramdisk was too large to fit in flash. Since then, users had to install Debian 6.0 (squeeze) and upgrade from there. When squeeze was removed from the Debian mirrors recently, I received mail from a number of users. I investigated a bit and found out that we can bring back the installer thanks to XZ compression and some other changes. The installer is available for jessie and stretch.

7 October 2015

Steve Kemp: Generating fingerprints from SSH keys

I've been allowing users to upload SSH public-keys, and displaying them online in a form. Displaying an SSH public key is a pain, because they're typically long. That means you need to wrap them, or truncate them, or you introduce a horizontal scroll-bar. So rather than displaying them I figured I'd generate a fingerprint when the key was uploaded and show that instead - This is exactly how github shows your ssh-keys. Annoyingly there is only one reasonable way to get a fingerprint from a key: You can sometimes calculate the key via more direct, but less obvious methods:
awk ' print $2 ' ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub   base64 -d   md5sum
But that won't work for all key-types. It is interesting to look at the various key-types which are available these days:
mkdir ~/ssh/
cd ~/ssh/
for i in dsa ecdsa ed25519 rsa rsa1 ; do
  ssh-keygen -P "" -t $i -f $ i -key
done
I've never seen an ed25519 key in the wild. It looks like this:
$ cat ~/ssh/ed25519-key.pub
ssh-ed25519 AAAAC3NzaC1lZDI1NTE5AAAAIMcT04t6UpewqQHWI4gfyBpP/ueSjbcGEze22vdlq0mW skx@shelob
Similarly curve-based keys are short too, but not as short:
ecdsa-sha2-nistp256 AAAAE2VjZHNhLXNoYTItbmlzdHAyNTYAAAAIbmlzdHAyNTYAAABBBLTJ5+  \
 rWoq5cNcjXdhzRiEK3Yq6tFSYr4DBsqkRI0ZqJdb+7RxbhJYUOq5jsBlHUzktYhOahEDlc9Lezz3ZUqXg= skx@shelob
Remember what I said about wrapping? Ha! Anyway for the moment I've hacked up a simple perl module SSH::Key::Fingerprint which will accept a public key and return the fingerprint, as well as validating the key is well-formed and of a known-type. I might make it public in the future, but I think the name is all wrong. The only code I could easily find to do a similar job is this node.js package, but it doesn't work on all key-types. Shame. And that concludes this weeks super-happy fun-time TODO-list item.

24 July 2015

Martin Michlmayr: Congratulations to Stefano Zacchiroli

Stefano Zacchiroli receiving the O'Reilly Open Source Award I attended OSCON's closing sessions today and was delighted to see my friend Stefano Zacchiroli (Zack) receive an O'Reilly Open Source Award. Zack acted as Debian Project Leader for three years, is working on important activities at the Open Source Initiative and the Free Software Foundation, and is generally an amazing advocate for free software. Thanks for all your contributions, Zack, and congratulations!

21 July 2015

Martin Michlmayr: Debian archive rebuild on ARM64 with GCC 5

I recently got access to several ProLiant m400 ARM64 servers at work. Since Debian is currently working on the migration to GCC 5, I thought it would be nice to rebuild the Debian archive on ARM64 to see if GCC 5 is ready. Fortunately, I found no obvious compiler errors. During the process, I noticed several areas where ARM64 support can be improved. First, a lot of packages failed to build due to missing dependencies. Some missing dependencies are libraries or tools that have not been ported to ARM64 yet, but the majority was due to the lack of popular programming languages on ARM64. This requires upstream porting work, which I'm sure is going on already in many cases. Second, over 160 packages failed to build due to out-of-date autoconf and libtool scripts. Most of these bugs have been reported over a year ago by the ARM64 porters (Matthias Klose from Canonical/Ubuntu and Wookey from ARM/Linaro) and the PowerPC porters, but unfortunately they haven't been fixed yet. Finally, I went through all packages that list specific architectures in debian/control and filed wishlist bugs on those that looked relevant to ARM64. This actually prompted some Debian and upstream developers to implement ARM64 support, which is great!

12 October 2014

Iustin Pop: Day trip on the Olympic Peninsula

Day trip on the Olympic Peninsula TL;DR: drove many kilometres on very nice roads, took lots of pictures, saw sunshine and fog and clouds, an angry ocean and a calm one, a quiet lake and lots and lots of trees: a very well spent day. Pictures at http://photos.k1024.org/Daytrips/Olympic-Peninsula-2014/. Sometimes I travel to the US on business, and as such I've been a few times in the Seattle area. Until this summer, when I had my last trip there, I was content to spend any extra days (weekend or such) just visiting Seattle itself, or shopping (I can spend hours in the REI store!), or working on my laptop in the hotel. This summer though, I thought - I should do something a bit different. Not too much, but still - no sense in wasting both days of the weekend. So I thought maybe driving to Mount Rainier, or something like that. On the Wednesday of my first week in Kirkland, as I was preparing my drive to the mountain, I made the mistake of scrolling the map westwards, and I saw for the first time the Olympic Peninsula; furthermore, I was zoomed in enough that I saw there was a small road right up to the north-west corner. Intrigued, I zoomed further and learned about Cape Flattery ( the northwestern-most point of the contiguous United States! ), so after spending a bit time reading about it, I was determined to go there. Easier said than done - from Kirkland, it's a 4h 40m drive (according to Google Maps), so it would be a full day on the road. I was thinking of maybe spending the night somewhere on the peninsula then, in order to actually explore the area a bit, but from Wednesday to Saturday it was a too short notice - all hotels that seemed OK-ish were fully booked. I spent some time trying to find something, even not directly on my way, but I failed to find any room. What I did manage to do though, is to learn a bit about the area, and to realise that there's a nice loop around the whole peninsula - the 104 from Kirkland up to where it meets the 101N on the eastern side, then take the 101 all the way to Port Angeles, Lake Crescent, near Lake Pleasant, then south toward Forks, crossing the Hoh river, down to Ruby Beach, down along the coast, crossing the Queets River, east toward Lake Quinault, south toward Aberdeen, then east towards Olympia and back out of the wilderness, into the highway network and back to Kirkland. This looked like an awesome road trip, but it is as long as it sounds - around 8 hours (continuous) drive, though skipping Cape Flattery. Well, I said to myself, something to keep in mind for a future trip to this area, with a night in between. I was still planning to go just to Cape Flattery and back, without realising at that point that this trip was actually longer (as you drive on smaller, lower-speed roads). Preparing my route, I read about the queues at the Edmonds-Kingston ferry, so I was planning to wake up early on the weekend, go to Cape Flattery, and go right back (maybe stop by Lake Crescent). Saturday comes, I - of course - sleep longer than my trip schedule said, and start the day in a somewhat cloudy weather, driving north from my hotel on Simonds Road, which was quite nicer than the usual East-West or North-South roads in this area. The weather was becoming nicer, however as I was nearing the ferry terminal and the traffic was getting denser, I started suspecting that I'll spend a quite a bit of time waiting to board the ferry. And unfortunately so it was (photo altered to hide some personal information): Waiting for the ferry. The weather at least was nice, so I tried to enjoy it and simply observe the crowd - people were looking forward to a weekend relaxing, so nobody seemed annoyed by the wait. After almost half an hour, time to get on the ferry - my first time on a ferry in US, yay! But it was quite the same as in Europe, just that the ship was much larger. Once I secured the car, I went up deck, and was very surprised to be treated with some excellent views: Harbour view Looking towards the sun   and away from it The crossing was not very short, but it seemed so, because of the view, the sun, the water and the wind. Soon we were nearing the other shore; also, see how well panorama software deals with waves :P! Near the other shore And I was finally on the "real" part of the trip. The road was quite interesting. Taking the 104 North, crossing the "Hood Canal Floating Bridge" (my, what a boring name), then finally joining the 101 North. The environment was quite varied, from bare plains and hills, to wooded areas, to quite dense forests, then into inhabited areas - quite a long stretch of human presence, from the Sequim Bay to Port Angeles. Port Angeles surprised me: it had nice views of the ocean, and an interesting port (a few big ships), but it was much smaller than I expected. The 101 crosses it, and in less than 10 minutes or so it was already over. I expected something nicer, based on the name, but Anyway, onwards! Soon I was at a crossroads and had to decide: I could either follow the 101, crossing the Elwha River and then to Lake Crescent, then go north on the 113/112, or go right off 101 onto 112, and follow it until close to my goal. I took the 112, because on the map it looked "nicer", and closer to the shore. Well, the road itself was nice, but quite narrow and twisty here and there, and there was some annoying traffic, so I didn't enjoy this segment very much. At least it had the very interesting property (to me) that whenever I got closer to the ocean, the sun suddenly disappeared, and I was finding myself in the fog: Foggy road So my plan to drive nicely along the coast failed. At one point, there was even heavy smoke (not fog!), and I wondered for a moment how safe was to drive out there in the wilderness (there were other cars though, so I was not alone). Only quite a bit later, close to Neah Bay, did I finally see the ocean: I saw a small parking spot, stopped, and crossing a small line of trees I found myself in a small cove? bay? In any case, I had the impression I stepped out of the daily life in the city and out into the far far wilderness: Dead trees on the beach Trees growing on a rock Small panorama of the cove There was a couple, sitting on chairs, just enjoying the view. I felt very much intruding, behaving like I did as a tourist: running in, taking pictures, etc., so I tried at least to be quiet . I then quickly moved on, since I still had some road ahead of me. Soon I entered Neah Bay, and was surprised to see once more blue, and even more blue. I'm a sucker for blue, whether sky blue or sea blue , so I took a few more pictures (watch out for the evil fog in the second one): View towards Neah Bay port Sea view from Neah Bay Well, the town had some event, and there were lots of people, so I just drove on, now on the last stretch towards the cape. The road here was also very interesting, yet another environment - I was driving on Cape Flattery Road, which cuts across the tip of the peninsula (quite narrow here) along the Waatch River and through its flooding plains (at least this is how it looked to me). Then it finally starts going up through the dense forest, until it reaches the parking lot, and from there, one goes on foot towards the cape. It's a very easy and nice walk (not a hike), and the sun was shining very nicely through the trees: Sunny forest Sun shinning down Wooden path But as I reached the peak of the walk, and started descending towards the coast, I was surprised, yet again, by fog: Ugly fog again! I realised that probably this means the cape is fully in fog, so I won't have any chance to enjoy the view. Boy, was I wrong! There are three viewpoints on the cape, and at each one I was just "wow" and "aah" at the view. Even thought it was not a sunny summer view, and there was no blue in sight, the combination between the fog (which was hiding the horizon and even the closer islands), the angry ocean which was throwing wave after wave at the shore, making a loud noise, and the fact that even this seemingly inhospitable area was just teeming with life, was both unexpected and awesome. I took here waay to many pictures, here are just a couple inlined: First view at the cape Birds 'enjoying' the weather Foggy shore I spent around half an hour here, just enjoying the rawness of nature. It was so amazing to see life encroaching on each bit of land, even though it was not what I would consider a nice place. Ah, how we see everything through our own eyes! The walk back was through fog again, and at one point it switched over back to sunny. Driving back on the same road was quite different, knowing what lies at its end. On this side, the road had some parking spots, so I managed to stop and take a picture - even though this area was much less wild, it still has that outdoors flavour, at least for me: Waatch River Back in Neah Bay, I stopped to eat. I had a place in mind from TripAdvisor, and indeed - I was able to get a custom order pizza at "Linda's Woodfired Kitchen". Quite good, and I ate without hurry, looking at the people walking outside, as they were coming back from the fair or event that was taking place. While eating, a somewhat disturbing thought was going through my mind. It was still early, around two to half past two, so if I went straight back to Kirkland I would be early at the hotel. But it was also early enough that I could - in theory at least - still do the "big round-trip". I was still rummaging the thought as I left On the drive back I passed once more near Sekiu, Washington, which is a very small place but the map tells me it even has an airport! Fun, and the view was quite nice (a bit of blue before the sea is swallowed by the fog): Sekiu view After passing Sekiu and Clallam Bay, the 112 curves inland and goes on a bit until you are at the crossroads: to the left the 112 continues, back the same way I came; to the right, it's the 113, going south until it meets the 101. I looked left - remembering the not-so-nice road back, I looked south - where a very appealing, early afternoon sun was beckoning - so I said, let's take the long way home! It's just a short stretch on the 113, and then you're on the 101. The 101 is a very nice road, wide enough, and it goes through very very nice areas. Here, west to south-west of the Olympic Mountains, it's a very different atmosphere from the 112/101 that I drove on in the morning; much warmer colours, a bit different tree types (I think), and more flat. I soon passed through Forks, which is one of the places I looked at when searching for hotels. I did so without any knowledge of the town itself (its wikipedia page is quite drab), so imagine my surprise when a month later I learned from a colleague that this is actually a very important place for vampire-book fans. Oh my, and I didn't even stop! This town also had some event, so I just drove on, enjoying the (mostly empty) road. My next planned waypoint was Ruby Beach, and I was looking forward to relaxing a bit under the warm sun - the drive was excellent, weather perfect, so I was watching the distance countdown on my Garmin. At two miles out, the "Near waypoint Ruby Beach" message appeared, and two seconds later the sun went out. What the I was hoping this is something temporary, but as I slowly drove the remaining mile I couldn't believe my eyes that I was, yet again, finding myself in the fog I park the car, thinking that asking for a refund would at least allow me to feel better - but it was I who planned the trip! So I resigned myself, thinking that possibly this beach is another special location that is always in the fog. However, getting near the beach it was clear that it was not so - some people were still in their bathing suits, just getting dressed, so it seems I was just unlucky with regards to timing. However, I the beach itself was nice, even in the fog (I later saw online sunny pictures, and it is quite beautiful), the the lush trees reach almost to the shore, and the way the rocks are sitting on the beach: A lonely dinghy Driftwood  and human construction People on the beach Since the weather was not that nice, I took a few more pictures, then headed back and started driving again. I was soo happy that the weather didn't clear at the 2 mile mark (it was not just Ruby Beach!), but alas - it cleared as soon as the 101 turns left and leaves the shore, as it crosses the Queets river. Driving towards my next planned stop was again a nice drive in the afternoon sun, so I think it simply was not a sunny day on the Pacific shore. Maybe seas and oceans have something to do with fog and clouds ! In Switzerland, I'm very happy when I see fog, since it's a somewhat rare event (and seeing mountains disappearing in the fog is nice, since it gives the impression of a wider space). After this day, I was a bit fed up with fog for a while Along the 101 one reaches Lake Quinault, which seemed pretty nice on the map, and driving a bit along the lake - a local symbol, the "World's largest spruce tree". I don't know what a spruce tree is, but I like trees, so I was planning to go there, weather allowing. And the weather did cooperate, except that the tree was not so imposing as I thought! In any case, I was glad to stretch my legs a bit: Path to largest spruce tree Largest spruce tree, far view Largest spruce tree, closer view Very short path back to the road However, the most interesting thing here in Quinault was not this tree, but rather - the quiet little town and the view on the lake, in the late afternoon sun: Quinault Quinault Lake view The entire town was very very quiet, and the sun shining down on the lake gave an even stronger sense of tranquillity. No wind, not many noises that tell of human presence, just a few, and an overall sense of peace. It was quite the opposite of the Cape Flattery and a very nice way to end the trip. Well, almost end - I still had a bit of driving ahead. Starting from Quinault, driving back and entering the 101, driving down to Aberdeen: Afternoon ride then turning east towards Olympia, and back onto the highways. As to Aberdeen and Olympia, I just drove through, so I couldn't make any impression of them. The old harbour and the rusted things in Aberdeen were a bit interesting, but the day was late so I didn't stop. And since the day shouldn't end without any surprises, during the last profile change between walking and driving in Quinault, my GPS decided to reset its active maps list and I ended up with all maps activated. This usually is not a problem, at least if you follow a pre-calculated route, but I did trigger recalculation as I restarted my driving, so the Montana was trying to decide on which map to route me - between the Garmin North America map and the Open StreeMap one, the result was that it never understood which road I was on. It always said "Drive to I5", even though I was on I5. Anyway, thanks to road signs, and no thanks to "just this evening ramp closures", I was able to arrive safely at my hotel. Overall, a very successful, if long trip: around 725 kilometres, 10h:30m moving, 13h:30m total: Track picture There were many individual good parts, but the overall think about this road trip was that I was able to experience lots of different environments of the peninsula on the same day, and that overall it's a very very nice area. The downside was that I was in a rush, without being able to actually stop and enjoy the locations I visited. And there's still so much to see! A two nights trip sound just about right, with some long hikes in the rain forest, and afternoons spent on a lake somewhere. Another not so optimal part was that I only had my "travel" camera (a Nikon 1 series camera, with a small sensor), which was a bit overwhelmed here and there by the situation. It was fortunate that the light was more or less good, but looking back at the pictures, how I wish that I had my "serious" DSLR So, that means I have two reasons to go back! Not too soon though, since Mount Rainier is also a good location to visit . If the pictures didn't bore you yet, the entire gallery is on my smugmug site. In any case, thanks for reading!

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