Search Results: "shields"

12 September 2023

Jo Shields: Building a NAS

The status quo Back in 2015, I bought an off-the-shelf NAS, a QNAP TS-453mini, to act as my file store and Plex server. I had previously owned a Synology box, and whilst I liked the Synology OS and experience, the hardware was underwhelming. I loaded up the successor QNAP with four 5TB drives in RAID10, and moved all my files over (after some initial DoA drive issues were handled).
QNAP TS-453mini product photoQNAP TS-453mini product photo
That thing has been in service for about 8 years now, and it s been a mixed bag. It was definitely more powerful than the predecessor system, but it was clear that QNAP s OS was not up to the same standard as Synology s perhaps best exemplified by HappyGet 2 , the QNAP webapp for downloading videos from streaming services like YouTube, whose icon is a straight rip-off of StarCraft 2. On its own, meaningless but a bad omen for overall software quality
The logo for QNAP HappyGet 2 and Blizzard's Starcraft 2 side by sideThe logo for QNAP HappyGet 2 and Blizzard s StarCraft 2 side by side
Additionally, the embedded Celeron processor in the NAS turned out to be an issue for some cases. It turns out, when playing back videos with subtitles, most Plex clients do not support subtitles properly instead they rely on the Plex server doing JIT transcoding to bake the subtitles directly into the video stream. I discovered this with some Blu-Ray rips of Game of Thrones some episodes would play back fine on my smart TV, but episodes with subtitled Dothraki speech would play at only 2 or 3 frames per second. The final straw was a ransomware attack, which went through all my data and locked every file below a 60MiB threshold. Practically all my music gone. A substantial collection of downloaded files, all gone. Some of these files had been carried around since my college days digital rarities, or at least digital detritus I felt a real sense of loss at having to replace. This episode was caused by a ransomware targeting specific vulnerabilities in the QNAP OS, not an error on my part. So, I decided to start planning a replacement with:
  • A non-garbage OS, whilst still being a NAS-appliance type offering (not an off-the-shelf Linux server distro)
  • Full remote management capabilities
  • A small form factor comparable to off-the-shelf NAS
  • A powerful modern CPU capable of transcoding high resolution video
  • All flash storage, no spinning rust
At the time, no consumer NAS offered everything (The Asustor FS6712X exists now, but didn t when this project started), so I opted to go for a full DIY rather than an appliance not the first time I ve jumped between appliances and DIY for home storage.

Selecting the core of the system There aren t many companies which will sell you a small motherboard with IPMI. Supermicro is a bust, so is Tyan. But ASRock Rack, the server division of third-tier motherboard vendor ASRock, delivers. Most of their boards aren t actually compliant Mini-ITX size, they re a proprietary Deep Mini-ITX with the regular screw holes, but 40mm of extra length (and a commensurately small list of compatible cases). But, thankfully, they do have a tiny selection of boards without the extra size, and I stumbled onto the X570D4I-2T, a board with an AMD AM4 socket and the mature X570 chipset. This board can use any AMD Ryzen chip (before the latest-gen Ryzen 7000 series); has built in dual 10 gigabit ethernet; IPMI; four (laptop-sized) RAM slots with full ECC support; one M.2 slot for NVMe SSD storage; a PCIe 16x slot (generally for graphics cards, but we live in a world of possibilities); and up to 8 SATA drives OR a couple more NVMe SSDs. It s astonishingly well featured, just a shame it costs about $450 compared to a good consumer-grade Mini ITX AM4 board costing less than half that. I was so impressed with the offering, in fact, that I crowed about it on Mastodon and ended up securing ASRock another sale, with someone else looking into a very similar project to mine around the same timespan. The next question was the CPU. An important feature of a system expected to run 24/7 is low power, and AM4 chips can consume as much as 130W under load, out of the box. At the other end, some models can require as little as 35W under load the OEM-only GE suffix chips, which are readily found for import on eBay. In their PRO variant, they also support ECC (all non-G Ryzen chips support ECC, but only Pro G chips do). The top of the range 8 core Ryzen 7 PRO 5750GE is prohibitively expensive, but the slightly weaker 6 core Ryzen 5 PRO 5650GE was affordable, and one arrived quickly from Hong Kong. Supplemented with a couple of cheap 16 GiB SODIMM sticks of DDR4 PC-3200 direct from Micron for under $50 a piece, that left only cooling as an unsolved problem to get a bootable test system. The official support list for the X570D4I-2T only includes two rackmount coolers, both expensive and hard to source. The reason for such a small list is the non standard cooling layout of the board instead of an AM4 hole pattern with the standard plastic AM4 retaining clips, it has an Intel 115x hole pattern with a non-standard backplate (Intel 115x boards have no backplate, the stock Intel 115x cooler attaches to the holes with push pins). As such every single cooler compatibility list excludes this motherboard. However, the backplate is only secured with a mild glue with minimal pressure and a plastic prying tool it can be removed, giving compatibility with any 115x cooler (which is basically any CPU cooler for more than a decade). I picked an oversized low profile Thermalright AXP120-X67 hoping that its 120mm fan would cool the nearby MOSFETs and X570 chipset too.
Thermalright AXP120-X67, AMD Ryzen 5 PRO 5650GE, ASRock Rack X570D4I-2T, all assembled and running on a flat surface

Testing up to this point Using a spare ATX power supply, I had enough of a system built to explore the IPMI and UEFI instances, and run MemTest86 to validate my progress. The memory test ran without a hitch and confirmed the ECC was working, although it also showed that the memory was only running at 2933 MT/s instead of the rated 3200 MT/s (a limit imposed by the motherboard, as higher speeds are considered overclocking). The IPMI interface isn t the best I ve ever used by a long shot, but it s minimum viable and allowed me to configure the basics and boot from media entirely via a Web browser.
Memtest86 showing test progress, taken from IPMI remote control window
One sad discovery, however, which I ve never seen documented before, on PCIe bifurcation. With PCI Express, you have a number of lanes which are allocated in groups by the motherboard and CPU manufacturer. For Ryzen prior to Ryzen 7000, that s 16 lanes in one slot for the graphics card; 4 lanes in one M.2 connector for an SSD; then 4 lanes connecting the CPU to the chipset, which can offer whatever it likes for peripherals or extra lanes (bottlenecked by that shared 4x link to the CPU, if it comes down to it). It s possible, with motherboard and CPU support, to split PCIe groups up for example an 8x slot could be split into two 4x slots (eg allowing two NVMe drives in an adapter card NVME drives these days all use 4x). However with a Cezanne Ryzen with integrated graphics, the 16x graphics card slot cannot be split into four 4x slots (ie used for for NVMe drives) the most bifurcation it allows is 8x4x4x, which is useless in a NAS.
Screenshot of PCIe 16x slot bifurcation options in UEFI settings, taken from IPMI remote control window
As such, I had to abandon any ideas of an all-NVMe NAS I was considering: the 16x slot split into four 4x, combined with two 4x connectors fed by the X570 chipset, to a total of 6 NVMe drives. 7.6TB U.2 enterprise disks are remarkably affordable (cheaper than consumer SATA 8TB drives), but alas, I was locked out by my 5650GE. Thankfully I found out before spending hundreds on a U.2 hot swap bay. The NVMe setup would be nearly 10x as fast as SATA SSDs, but at least the SATA SSD route would still outperform any spinning rust choice on the market (including the fastest 10K RPM SAS drives)

Containing the core The next step was to pick a case and power supply. A lot of NAS cases require an SFX (rather than ATX) size supply, so I ordered a modular SX500 unit from Silverstone. Even if I ended up with a case requiring ATX, it s easy to turn an SFX power supply into ATX, and the worst result is you have less space taken up in your case, hardly the worst problem to have. That said, on to picking a case. There s only one brand with any cachet making ITX NAS cases, Silverstone. They have three choices in an appropriate size: CS01-HS, CS280, and DS380. The problem is, these cases are all badly designed garbage. Take the CS280 as an example, the case with the most space for a CPU cooler. Here s how close together the hotswap bay (right) and power supply (left) are:
Internal image of Silverstone CS280 NAS build. Image stolen from ServeTheHome
With actual cables connected, the cable clearance problem is even worse:
Internal image of Silverstone CS280 NAS build. Image stolen from ServeTheHome
Remember, this is the best of the three cases for internal layout, the one with the least restriction on CPU cooler height. And it s garbage! Total hot garbage! I decided therefore to completely skip the NAS case market, and instead purchase a 5.25 -to-2.5 hot swap bay adapter from Icy Dock, and put it in an ITX gamer case with a 5.25 bay. This is no longer a served market 5.25 bays are extinct since nobody uses CD/DVD drives anymore. The ones on the market are really new old stock from 2014-2017: The Fractal Design Core 500, Cooler Master Elite 130, and Silverstone SUGO 14. Of the three, the Fractal is the best rated so I opted to get that one however it seems the global supply of new old stock fully dried up in the two weeks between me making a decision and placing an order leaving only the Silverstone case. Icy Dock have a selection of 8-bay 2.5 SATA 5.25 hot swap chassis choices in their ToughArmor MB998 series. I opted for the ToughArmor MB998IP-B, to reduce cable clutter it requires only two SFF-8611-to-SF-8643 cables from the motherboard to serve all eight bays, which should make airflow less of a mess. The X570D4I-2T doesn t have any SATA ports on board, instead it has two SFF-8611 OCuLink ports, each supporting 4 PCI Express lanes OR 4 SATA connectors via a breakout cable. I had hoped to get the ToughArmor MB118VP-B and run six U.2 drives, but as I said, the PCIe bifurcation issue with Ryzen G chips meant I wouldn t be able to run all six bays successfully.
NAS build in Silverstone SUGO 14, mid build, panels removed
Silverstone SUGO 14 from the front, with hot swap bay installed

Actual storage for the storage server My concept for the system always involved a fast boot/cache drive in the motherboard s M.2 slot, non-redundant (just backups of the config if the worst were to happen) and separate storage drives somewhere between 3.8 and 8 TB each (somewhere from $200-$350). As a boot drive, I selected the Intel Optane SSD P1600X 58G, available for under $35 and rated for 228 years between failures (or 11,000 complete drive rewrite cycles). So, on to the big expensive choice: storage drives. I narrowed it down to two contenders: new-old-stock Intel D3-S4510 3.84TB enterprise drives, at about $200, or Samsung 870 QVO 8TB consumer drives, at about $375. I did spend a long time agonizing over the specification differences, the ZFS usage reports, the expected lifetime endurance figures, but in reality, it came down to price $1600 of expensive drives vs $3200 of even more expensive drives. That s 27TB of usable capacity in RAID-Z1, or 23TB in RAID-Z2. For comparison, I m using about 5TB of the old NAS, so that s a LOT of overhead for expansion.
Storage SSD loaded into hot swap sled

Booting up Bringing it all together is the OS. I wanted an appliance NAS OS rather than self-administering a Linux distribution, and after looking into the surrounding ecosystems, decided on TrueNAS Scale (the beta of the 2023 release, based on Debian 12).
TrueNAS Dashboard screenshot in browser window
I set up RAID-Z1, and with zero tuning (other than enabling auto-TRIM), got the following performance numbers:
IOPSBandwidth
4k random writes19.3k75.6 MiB/s
4k random reads36.1k141 MiB/s
Sequential writes 2300 MiB/s
Sequential reads 3800 MiB/s
Results using fio parameters suggested by Huawei
And for comparison, the maximum theoretical numbers quoted by Intel for a single drive:
IOPSBandwidth
4k random writes16k?
4k random reads90k?
Sequential writes 280 MiB/s
Sequential reads 560 MiB/s
Numbers quoted by Intel SSD successors Solidigm.
Finally, the numbers reported on the old NAS with four 7200 RPM hard disks in RAID 10:
IOPSBandwidth
4k random writes4301.7 MiB/s
4k random reads800632 MiB/s
Sequential writes 311 MiB/s
Sequential reads 566 MiB/s
Performance seems pretty OK. There s always going to be an overhead to RAID. I ll settle for the 45x improvement on random writes vs. its predecessor, and 4.5x improvement on random reads. The sequential write numbers are gonna be impacted by the size of the ZFS cache (50% of RAM, so 16 GiB), but the rest should be a reasonable indication of true performance. It took me a little while to fully understand the TrueNAS permissions model, but I finally got Plex configured to access data from the same place as my SMB shares, which have anonymous read-only access or authenticated write access for myself and my wife, working fine via both Linux and Windows. And that s it! I built a NAS. I intend to add some fans and more RAM, but that s the build. Total spent: about $3000, which sounds like an unreasonable amount, but it s actually less than a comparable Synology DiskStation DS1823xs+ which has 4 cores instead of 6, first-generation AMD Zen instead of Zen 3, 8 GiB RAM instead of 32 GiB, no hardware-accelerated video transcoding, etc. And it would have been a whole lot less fun!
The final system, powered up
(Also posted on PCPartPicker)

23 August 2023

Jo Shields: Retirement

Apparently it s nearly four years since I last posted to my blog. Which is, to a degree, the point here. My time, and priorities, have changed over the years. And this lead me to the decision that my available time and priorities in 2023 aren t compatible with being a Debian or Ubuntu developer, and realistically, haven t been for years. As of earlier this month, I quit as a Debian Developer and Ubuntu MOTU. I think a lot of my blogging energy got absorbed by social media over the last decade, but with the collapse of Twitter and Reddit due to mismanagement, I m trying to allocate more time for blog-based things instead. I may write up some of the things I ve achieved at work (.NET 8 is now snapped for release Soon ). I might even blog about work-adjacent controversial topics, like my changed feelings about the entire concept of distribution packages. But there s time for that later. Maybe. I ll keep tagging vaguely FOSS related topics with the Debian and Ubuntu tags, which cause them to be aggregated in the Planet Debian/Ubuntu feeds (RSS, remember that from the before times?!) until an admin on those sites gets annoyed at the off-topic posting of an emeritus dev and deletes them. But that s where we are. Rather than ignore my distro obligations, I ve admitted that I just don t have the energy any more. Let someone less perpetually exhausted than me take over. And if they don t, maybe that s OK too.

30 May 2023

Russ Allbery: Review: The Mimicking of Known Successes

Review: The Mimicking of Known Successes, by Malka Older
Series: Mossa and Pleiti #1
Publisher: Tordotcom
Copyright: 2023
ISBN: 1-250-86051-2
Format: Kindle
Pages: 169
The Mimicking of Known Successes is a science fiction mystery novella, the first of an expected series. (The second novella is scheduled to be published in February of 2024.) Mossa is an Investigator, called in after a man disappears from the eastward platform on the 4 63' line. It's an isolated platform, five hours away from Mossa's base, and home to only four residential buildings and a pub. The most likely explanation is that the man jumped, but his behavior before he disappeared doesn't seem consistent with that theory. He was bragging about being from Valdegeld University, talking to anyone who would listen about the important work he was doing not typically the behavior of someone who is suicidal. Valdegeld is the obvious next stop in the investigation. Pleiti is a Classics scholar at Valdegeld. She is also Mossa's ex-girlfriend, making her both an obvious and a fraught person to ask for investigative help. Mossa is the last person she expected to be waiting for her on the railcar platform when she returns from a trip to visit her parents. The Mimicking of Known Successes is mostly a mystery, following Mossa's attempts to untangle the story of what happened to the disappeared man, but as you might have guessed there's a substantial sapphic romance subplot. It's also at least adjacent to Sherlock Holmes: Mossa is brilliant, observant, somewhat monomaniacal, and very bad at human relationships. All of this story except for the prologue is told from Pleiti's perspective as she plays a bit of a Watson role, finding Mossa unreadable, attractive, frustrating, and charming in turn. Following more recent Holmes adaptations, Mossa is portrayed as probably neurodivergent, although the story doesn't attach any specific labels. I have no strong opinions about this novella. It was fine? There's a mystery with a few twists, there's a sapphic romance of the second chance variety, there's a bit of action and a bit of hurt/comfort after the action, and it all felt comfortably entertaining but kind of predictable. Susan Stepney has a "passes the time" review rating, and while that may be a bit harsh, that's about where I ended up. The most interesting part of the story is the science fiction setting. We're some indefinite period into the future. Humans have completely messed up Earth to the point of making it uninhabitable. We then took a shot at terraforming Mars and messed that planet up to the point of uninhabitability as well. Now, what's left of humanity (maybe not all of it the story isn't clear) lives on platforms connected by rail lines high in the atmosphere of Jupiter. (Everyone in the story calls Jupiter "Giant" for reasons that I didn't follow, given that they didn't rename any of its moons.) Pleiti's position as a Classics scholar means that she studies Earth and its now-lost ecosystems, whereas the Modern faculty focus on their new platform life. This background does become relevant to the mystery, although exactly how is not clear at the start. I wouldn't call this a very realistic setting. One has to accept that people are living on platforms attached to artificial rings around the solar system's largest planet and walk around in shirt sleeves and only minor technological support due to "atmoshields" of some unspecified capability, and where the native atmosphere plays the role of London fog. Everything feels vaguely Edwardian, including to the occasional human porter and message runner, which matches the story concept but seems unlikely as a plausible future culture. I also disbelieve in humanity's ability to do anything to Earth that would make it less inhabitable than the clouds of Jupiter. That said, the setting is a lot of fun, which is probably more important. It's fun to try to visualize, and it has that slightly off-balance, occasionally surprising feel of science fiction settings where everyone is recognizably human but the things they consider routine and unremarkable are unexpected by the reader. This novella also has a great title. The Mimicking of Known Successes is simultaneously a reference a specific plot point from late in the story, a nod to the shape of the romance, and an acknowledgment of the Holmes pastiche, and all of those references work even better once you know what the plot point is. That was nicely done. This was not very memorable apart from the setting, but it was pleasant enough. I can't say that I'm inspired to pre-order the next novella in this series, but I also wouldn't object to reading it. If you're in the mood for gender-swapped Holmes in an exotic setting, you could do worse. Followed by The Imposition of Unnecessary Obstacles. Rating: 6 out of 10

11 April 2021

Vishal Gupta: Sikkim 101 for Backpackers

Host to Kanchenjunga, the world s third-highest mountain peak and the endangered Red Panda, Sikkim is a state in northeastern India. Nestled between Nepal, Tibet (China), Bhutan and West Bengal (India), the state offers a smorgasbord of cultures and cuisines. That said, it s hardly surprising that the old spice route meanders through western Sikkim, connecting Lhasa with the ports of Bengal. Although the latter could also be attributed to cardamom (kali elaichi), a perennial herb native to Sikkim, which the state is the second-largest producer of, globally. Lastly, having been to and lived in India, all my life, I can confidently say Sikkim is one of the cleanest & safest regions in India, making it ideal for first-time backpackers.

Brief History
  • 17th century: The Kingdom of Sikkim is founded by the Namgyal dynasty and ruled by Buddhist priest-kings known as the Chogyal.
  • 1890: Sikkim becomes a princely state of British India.
  • 1947: Sikkim continues its protectorate status with the Union of India, post-Indian-independence.
  • 1973: Anti-royalist riots take place in front of the Chogyal's palace, by Nepalis seeking greater representation.
  • 1975: Referendum leads to the deposition of the monarchy and Sikkim joins India as its 22nd state.
Languages
  • Official: English, Nepali, Sikkimese/Bhotia and Lepcha
  • Though Hindi and Nepali share the same script (Devanagari), they are not mutually intelligible. Yet, most people in Sikkim can understand and speak Hindi.
Ethnicity
  • Nepalis: Migrated in large numbers (from Nepal) and soon became the dominant community
  • Bhutias: People of Tibetan origin. Major inhabitants in Northern Sikkim.
  • Lepchas: Original inhabitants of Sikkim

Food
  • Tibetan/Nepali dishes (mostly consumed during winter)
    • Thukpa: Noodle soup, rich in spices and vegetables. Usually contains some form of meat. Common variations: Thenthuk and Gyathuk
    • Momos: Steamed or fried dumplings, usually with a meat filling.
    • Saadheko: Spicy marinated chicken salad.
    • Gundruk Soup: A soup made from Gundruk, a fermented leafy green vegetable.
    • Sinki : A fermented radish tap-root product, traditionally consumed as a base for soup and as a pickle. Eerily similar to Kimchi.
  • While pork and beef are pretty common, finding vegetarian dishes is equally easy.
  • Staple: Dal-Bhat with Subzi. Rice is a lot more common than wheat (rice) possibly due to greater carb content and proximity to West Bengal, India s largest producer of Rice.
  • Good places to eat in Gangtok
    • Hamro Bhansa Ghar, Nimtho (Nepali)
    • Taste of Tibet
    • Dragon Wok (Chinese & Japanese)

Buddhism in Sikkim
  • Bayul Demojong (Sikkim), is the most sacred Land in the Himalayas as per the belief of the Northern Buddhists and various religious texts.
  • Sikkim was blessed by Guru Padmasambhava, the great Buddhist saint who visited Sikkim in the 8th century and consecrated the land.
  • However, Buddhism is said to have reached Sikkim only in the 17th century with the arrival of three Tibetan monks viz. Rigdzin Goedki Demthruchen, Mon Kathok Sonam Gyaltshen & Rigdzin Legden Je at Yuksom. Together, they established a Buddhist monastery.
  • In 1642 they crowned Phuntsog Namgyal as the first monarch of Sikkim and gave him the title of Chogyal, or Dharma Raja.
  • The faith became popular through its royal patronage and soon many villages had their own monastery.
  • Today Sikkim has over 200 monasteries.

Major monasteries
  • Rumtek Monastery, 20Km from Gangtok
  • Lingdum/Ranka Monastery, 17Km from Gangtok
  • Phodong Monastery, 28Km from Gangtok
  • Ralang Monastery, 10Km from Ravangla
  • Tsuklakhang Monastery, Royal Palace, Gangtok
  • Enchey Monastery, Gangtok
  • Tashiding Monastery, 35Km from Ravangla


Reaching Sikkim
  • Gangtok, being the capital, is easiest to reach amongst other regions, by public transport and shared cabs.
  • By Air:
    • Pakyong (PYG) :
      • Nearest airport from Gangtok (about 1 hour away)
      • Tabletop airport
      • Reserved cabs cost around INR 1200.
      • As of Apr 2021, the only flights to PYG are from IGI (Delhi) and CCU (Kolkata).
    • Bagdogra (IXB) :
      • About 20 minutes from Siliguri and 4 hours from Gangtok.
      • Larger airport with flights to most major Indian cities.
      • Reserved cabs cost about INR 3000. Shared cabs cost about INR 350.
  • By Train:
    • New Jalpaiguri (NJP) :
      • About 20 minutes from Siliguri and 4 hours from Gangtok.
      • Reserved cabs cost about INR 3000. Shared cabs from INR 350.
  • By Road:
    • NH10 connects Siliguri to Gangtok
    • If you can t find buses plying to Gangtok directly, reach Siliguri and then take a cab to Gangtok.
  • Sikkim Nationalised Transport Div. also runs hourly buses between Siliguri and Gangtok and daily buses on other common routes. They re cheaper than shared cabs.
  • Wizzride also operates shared cabs between Siliguri/Bagdogra/NJP, Gangtok and Darjeeling. They cost about the same as shared cabs but pack in half as many people in luxury cars (Innova, Xylo, etc.) and are hence more comfortable.

Gangtok
  • Time needed: 1D/1N
  • Places to visit:
    • Hanuman Tok
    • Ganesh Tok
    • Tashi View Point [6,800ft]
    • MG Marg
    • Sikkim Zoo
    • Gangtok Ropeway
    • Enchey Monastery
    • Tsuklakhang Palace & Monastery
  • Hostels: Tagalong Backpackers (would strongly recommend), Zostel Gangtok
  • Places to chill: Travel Cafe, Caf Live & Loud and Gangtok Groove
  • Places to shop: Lal Market and MG Marg

Getting Around
  • Taxis operate on a reserved or shared basis. In case of the latter, you can pool with other commuters your taxis will pick up and drop en-route.
  • Naturally shared taxis only operate on popular routes. The easiest way to get around Gangtok is to catch a shared cab from MG Marg.
  • Reserved taxis for Gangtok sightseeing cost around INR 1000-1500, depending upon the spots you d like to see
  • Key taxi/bus stands :
    • Deorali stand: For Darjeeling, Siliguri, Kalimpong
    • Vajra stand: For North & East Sikkim (Tsomgo Lake & Nathula)
    • Rumtek taxi: For Ravangla, Pelling, Namchi, Geyzing, Jorethang and Singtam.
Exploring Gangtok on an MTB

North Sikkim
  • The easiest & most economical way to explore North Sikkim is the 3D/2N package offered by shared-cab drivers.
  • This includes food, permits, cab rides and accommodation (1N in Lachen and 1N in Lachung)
  • The accommodation on both nights are at homestays with bare necessities, so keep your hopes low.
  • In the spirit of sustainable tourism, you ll be asked to discard single-use plastic bottles, so please carry a bottle that you can refill along the way.
  • Zero Point and Gurdongmer Lake are snow-capped throughout the year
3D/2N Shared-cab Package Itinerary
  • Day 1
    • Gangtok (10am) - Chungthang - Lachung (stay)
  • Day 2
    • Pre-lunch : Lachung (6am) - Yumthang Valley [12,139ft] - Zero Point - Lachung [15,300ft]
    • Post-lunch : Lachung - Chungthang - Lachen (stay)
  • Day 3
    • Pre-lunch : Lachen (5am) - Kala Patthar - Gurdongmer Lake [16,910ft] - Lachen
    • Post-lunch : Lachen - Chungthang - Gangtok (7pm)
  • This itinerary is idealistic and depends on the level of snowfall.
  • Some drivers might switch up Day 2 and 3 itineraries by visiting Lachen and then Lachung, depending upon the weather.
  • Areas beyond Lachen & Lachung are heavily militarized since the Indo-China border is only a few miles away.

East Sikkim

Zuluk and Silk Route
  • Time needed: 2D/1N
  • Zuluk [9,400ft] is a small hamlet with an excellent view of the eastern Himalayan range including the Kanchenjunga.
  • Was once a transit point to the historic Silk Route from Tibet (Lhasa) to India (West Bengal).
  • The drive from Gangtok to Zuluk takes at least four hours. Hence, it makes sense to spend the night at a homestay and space out your trip to Zuluk

Tsomgo Lake and Nathula
  • Time Needed : 1D
  • A Protected Area Permit is required to visit these places, due to their proximity to the Chinese border
  • Tsomgo/Chhangu Lake [12,313ft]
    • Glacial lake, 40 km from Gangtok.
    • Remains frozen during the winter season.
    • You can also ride on the back of a Yak for INR 300
  • Baba Mandir
    • An old temple dedicated to Baba Harbhajan Singh, a Sepoy in the 23rd Regiment, who died in 1962 near the Nathu La during Indo China war.
  • Nathula Pass [14,450ft]
    • Located on the Indo-Tibetan border crossing of the Old Silk Route, it is one of the three open trading posts between India and China.
    • Plays a key role in the Sino-Indian Trade and also serves as an official Border Personnel Meeting(BPM) Point.
    • May get cordoned off by the Indian Army in event of heavy snowfall or for other security reasons.


West Sikkim
  • Time needed: 3N/1N
  • Hostels at Pelling : Mochilerro Ostillo

Itinerary

Day 1: Gangtok - Ravangla - Pelling
  • Leave Gangtok early, for Ravangla through the Temi Tea Estate route.
  • Spend some time at the tea garden and then visit Buddha Park at Ravangla
  • Head to Pelling from Ravangla

Day 2: Pelling sightseeing
  • Hire a cab and visit Skywalk, Pemayangtse Monastery, Rabdentse Ruins, Kecheopalri Lake, Kanchenjunga Falls.

Day 3: Pelling - Gangtok/Siliguri
  • Wake up early to catch a glimpse of Kanchenjunga at the Pelling Helipad around sunrise
  • Head back to Gangtok on a shared-cab
  • You could take a bus/taxi back to Siliguri if Pelling is your last stop.

Darjeeling
  • In my opinion, Darjeeling is lovely for a two-day detour on your way back to Bagdogra/Siliguri and not any longer (unless you re a Bengali couple on a honeymoon)
  • Once a part of Sikkim, Darjeeling was ceded to the East India Company after a series of wars, with Sikkim briefly receiving a grant from EIC for gifting Darjeeling to the latter
  • Post-independence, Darjeeling was merged with the state of West Bengal.

Itinerary

Day 1 :
  • Take a cab from Gangtok to Darjeeling (shared-cabs cost INR 300 per seat)
  • Reach Darjeeling by noon and check in to your Hostel. I stayed at Hideout.
  • Spend the evening visiting either a monastery (or the Batasia Loop), Nehru Road and Mall Road.
  • Grab dinner at Glenary whilst listening to live music.

Day 2:
  • Wake up early to catch the sunrise and a glimpse of Kanchenjunga at Tiger Hill. Since Tiger Hill is 10km from Darjeeling and requires a permit, book your taxi in advance.
  • Alternatively, if you don t want to get up at 4am or shell out INR1500 on the cab to Tiger Hill, walk to the Kanchenjunga View Point down Mall Road
  • Next, queue up outside Keventers for breakfast with a view in a century-old cafe
  • Get a cab at Gandhi Road and visit a tea garden (Happy Valley is the closest) and the Ropeway. I was lucky to meet 6 other backpackers at my hostel and we ended up pooling the cab at INR 200 per person, with INR 1400 being on the expensive side, but you could bargain.
  • Get lunch, buy some tea at Golden Tips, pack your bags and hop on a shared-cab back to Siliguri. It took us about 4hrs to reach Siliguri, with an hour to spare before my train.
  • If you ve still got time on your hands, then check out the Peace Pagoda and the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway (Toy Train). At INR 1500, I found the latter to be too expensive and skipped it.


Tips and hacks
  • Download offline maps, especially when you re exploring Northern Sikkim.
  • Food and booze are the cheapest in Gangtok. Stash up before heading to other regions.
  • Keep your Aadhar/Passport handy since you need permits to travel to North & East Sikkim.
  • In rural areas and some cafes, you may get to try Rhododendron Wine, made from Rhododendron arboreum a.k.a Gurans. Its production is a little hush-hush since the flower is considered holy and is also the National Flower of Nepal.
  • If you don t want to invest in a new jacket, boots or a pair of gloves, you can always rent them at nominal rates from your hotel or little stores around tourist sites.
  • Check the weather of a region before heading there. Low visibility and precipitation can quite literally dampen your experience.
  • Keep your itinerary flexible to accommodate for rest and impromptu plans.
  • Shops and restaurants close by 8pm in Sikkim and Darjeeling. Plan for the same.

Carry
  • a couple of extra pairs of socks (woollen, if possible)
  • a pair of slippers to wear indoors
  • a reusable water bottle
  • an umbrella
  • a power bank
  • a couple of tablets of Diamox. Helps deal with altitude sickness
  • extra clothes and wet bags since you may not get a chance to wash/dry your clothes
  • a few passport size photographs

Shared-cab hacks
  • Intercity rides can be exhausting. If you can afford it, pay for an additional seat.
  • Call shotgun on the drives beyond Lachen and Lachung. The views are breathtaking.
  • Return cabs tend to be cheaper (WB cabs travelling from SK and vice-versa)

Cost
  • My median daily expenditure (back when I went to Sikkim in early March 2021) was INR 1350.
  • This includes stay (bunk bed), food, wine and transit (shared cabs)
  • In my defence, I splurged on food, wine and extra seats in shared cabs, but if you re on a budget, you could easily get by on INR 1 - 1.2k per day.
  • For a 9-day trip, I ended up shelling out nearly INR 15k, including 2AC trains to & from Kolkata
  • Note : Summer (March to May) and Autumn (October to December) are peak seasons, and thereby more expensive to travel around.

Souvenirs and things you should buy

Buddhist souvenirs :
  • Colourful Prayer Flags (great for tying on bikes or behind car windshields)
  • Miniature Prayer/Mani Wheels
  • Lucky Charms, Pendants and Key Chains
  • Cham Dance masks and robes
  • Singing Bowls
  • Common symbols: Om mani padme hum, Ashtamangala, Zodiac signs

Handicrafts & Handlooms
  • Tibetan Yak Wool shawls, scarfs and carpets
  • Sikkimese Ceramic cups
  • Thangka Paintings

Edibles
  • Darjeeling Tea (usually brewed and not boiled)
  • Wine (Arucha Peach & Rhododendron)
  • Dalle Khursani (Chilli) Paste and Pickle

Header Icon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com is licensed by CC 3.0 BY

28 March 2020

Fran ois Marier: How to get a direct WebRTC connections between two computers

WebRTC is a standard real-time communication protocol built directly into modern web browsers. It enables the creation of video conferencing services which do not require participants to download additional software. Many services make use of it and it almost always works out of the box. The reason it just works is that it uses a protocol called ICE to establish a connection regardless of the network environment. What that means however is that in some cases, your video/audio connection will need to be relayed (using end-to-end encryption) to the other person via third-party TURN server. In addition to adding extra network latency to your call that relay server might overloaded at some point and drop or delay packets coming through. Here's how to tell whether or not your WebRTC calls are being relayed, and how to ensure you get a direct connection to the other host.

Testing basic WebRTC functionality Before you place a real call, I suggest using the official test page which will test your camera, microphone and network connectivity. Note that this test page makes use of a Google TURN server which is locked to particular HTTP referrers and so you'll need to disable privacy features that might interfere with this:
  • Brave: Disable Shields entirely for that page (Simple view) or allow all cookies for that page (Advanced view).
  • Firefox: Ensure that http.network.referer.spoofSource is set to false in about:config, which it is by default.
  • uMatrix: The "Spoof Referer header" option needs to be turned off for that site.

Checking the type of peer connection you have Once you know that WebRTC is working in your browser, it's time to establish a connection and look at the network configuration that the two peers agreed on. My favorite service at the moment is Whereby (formerly Appear.in), so I'm going to use that to connect from two different computers:
  • canada is a laptop behind a regular home router without any port forwarding.
  • siberia is a desktop computer in a remote location that is also behind a home router, but in this case its internal IP address (192.168.1.2) is set as the DMZ host.

Chromium For all Chromium-based browsers, such as Brave, Chrome, Edge, Opera and Vivaldi, the debugging page you'll need to open is called chrome://webrtc-internals. Look for RTCIceCandidatePair lines and expand them one at a time until you find the one which says:
  • state: succeeded (or state: in-progress)
  • nominated: true
  • writable: true
Then from the name of that pair (N6cxxnrr_OEpeash in the above example) find the two matching RTCIceCandidate lines (one local-candidate and one remote-candidate) and expand them. In the case of a direct connection, I saw the following on the remote-candidate:
  • ip shows the external IP address of siberia
  • port shows a random number between 1024 and 65535
  • candidateType: srflx
and the following on local-candidate:
  • ip shows the external IP address of canada
  • port shows a random number between 1024 and 65535
  • candidateType: prflx
These candidate types indicate that a STUN server was used to determine the public-facing IP address and port for each computer, but the actual connection between the peers is direct. On the other hand, for a relayed/proxied connection, I saw the following on the remote-candidate side:
  • ip shows an IP address belonging to the TURN server
  • candidateType: relay
and the same information as before on the local-candidate.

Firefox If you are using Firefox, the debugging page you want to look at is about:webrtc. Expand the top entry under "Session Statistics" and look for the line (should be the first one) which says the following in green:
  • ICE State: succeeded
  • Nominated: true
  • Selected: true
then look in the "Local Candidate" and "Remote Candidate" sections to find the candidate type in brackets.

Firewall ports to open to avoid using a relay In order to get a direct connection to the other WebRTC peer, one of the two computers (in my case, siberia) needs to open all inbound UDP ports since there doesn't appear to be a way to restrict Chromium or Firefox to a smaller port range for incoming WebRTC connections. This isn't great and so I decided to tighten that up in two ways by:
  • restricting incoming UDP traffic to the IP range of siberia's ISP, and
  • explicitly denying incoming to the UDP ports I know are open on siberia.
To get the IP range, start with the external IP address of the machine (I'll use the IP address of my blog in this example: 66.228.46.55) and pass it to the whois command:
$ whois 66.228.46.55   grep CIDR
CIDR:           66.228.32.0/19
To get the list of open UDP ports on siberia, I sshed into it and ran nmap:
$ sudo nmap -sU localhost
Starting Nmap 7.60 ( https://nmap.org ) at 2020-03-28 15:55 PDT
Nmap scan report for localhost (127.0.0.1)
Host is up (0.000015s latency).
Not shown: 994 closed ports
PORT      STATE         SERVICE
631/udp   open filtered ipp
5060/udp  open filtered sip
5353/udp  open          zeroconf
Nmap done: 1 IP address (1 host up) scanned in 190.25 seconds
I ended up with the following in my /etc/network/iptables.up.rules (ports below 1024 are denied by the default rule and don't need to be included here):
# Deny all known-open high UDP ports before enabling WebRTC for canada
-A INPUT -p udp --dport 5060 -j DROP
-A INPUT -p udp --dport 5353 -j DROP
-A INPUT -s 66.228.32.0/19 -p udp --dport 1024:65535 -j ACCEPT

2 November 2017

Antoine Beaupr : October 2017 report: LTS, feed2exec beta, pandoc filters, git mediawiki

Debian Long Term Support (LTS) This is my monthly Debian LTS report. This time I worked on the famous KRACK attack, git-annex, golang and the continuous stream of GraphicsMagick security issues.

WPA & KRACK update I spent most of my time this month on the Linux WPA code, to backport it to the old (~2012) wpa_supplicant release. I first published a patchset based on the patches shipped after the embargo for the oldstable/jessie release. After feedback from the list, I also built packages for i386 and ARM. I have also reviewed the WPA protocol to make sure I understood the implications of the changes required to backport the patches. For example, I removed the patches touching the WNM sleep mode code as that was introduced only in the 2.0 release. Chunks of code regarding state tracking were also not backported as they are part of the state tracking code introduced later, in 3ff3323. Finally, I still have concerns about the nonce setup in patch #5. In the last chunk, you'll notice peer->tk is reset, to_set to negotiate a new TK. The other approach I considered was to backport 1380fcbd9f ("TDLS: Do not modify RNonce for an TPK M1 frame with same INonce") but I figured I would play it safe and not introduce further variations. I should note that I share Matthew Green's observations regarding the opacity of the protocol. Normally, network protocols are freely available and security researchers like me can easily review them. In this case, I would have needed to read the opaque 802.11i-2004 pdf which is behind a TOS wall at the IEEE. I ended up reading up on the IEEE_802.11i-2004 Wikipedia article which gives a simpler view of the protocol. But it's a real problem to see such critical protocols developed behind closed doors like this. At Guido's suggestion, I sent the final patch upstream explaining the concerns I had with the patch. I have not, at the time of writing, received any response from upstream about this, unfortunately. I uploaded the fixed packages as DLA 1150-1 on October 31st.

Git-annex The next big chunk on my list was completing the work on git-annex (CVE-2017-12976) that I started in August. It turns out doing the backport was simpler than I expected, even with my rusty experience with Haskell. Type-checking really helps in doing the right thing, especially considering how Joey Hess implemented the fix: by introducing a new type. So I backported the patch from upstream and notified the security team that the jessie and stretch updates would be similarly easy. I shipped the backport to LTS as DLA-1144-1. I also shared the updated packages for jessie (which required a similar backport) and stretch (which didn't) and those Sebastien Delafond published those as DSA 4010-1.

Graphicsmagick Up next was yet another security vulnerability in the Graphicsmagick stack. This involved the usual deep dive into intricate and sometimes just unreasonable C code to try and fit a round tree in a square sinkhole. I'm always unsure about those patches, but the test suite passes, smoke tests show the vulnerability as fixed, and that's pretty much as good as it gets. The announcement (DLA 1154-1) turned out to be a little special because I had previously noticed that the penultimate announcement (DLA 1130-1) was never sent out. So I made a merged announcement to cover both instead of re-sending the original 3 weeks late, which may have been confusing for our users.

Triage & misc We always do a bit of triage even when not on frontdesk duty, so I: I also did smaller bits of work on: The latter reminded me of the concerns I have about the long-term maintainability of the golang ecosystem: because everything is statically linked, an update to a core library (say the SMTP library as in CVE-2017-15042, thankfully not affecting LTS) requires a full rebuild of all packages including the library in all distributions. So what would be a simple update in a shared library system could mean an explosion of work on statically linked infrastructures. This is a lot of work which can definitely be error-prone: as I've seen in other updates, some packages (for example the Ruby interpreter) just bit-rot on their own and eventually fail to build from source. We would also have to investigate all packages to see which one include the library, something which we are not well equipped for at this point. Wheezy was the first release shipping golang packages but at least it's shipping only one... Stretch has shipped with two golang versions (1.7 and 1.8) which will make maintenance ever harder in the long term.
We build our computers the way we build our cities--over time, without a plan, on top of ruins. - Ellen Ullman

Other free software work This month again, I was busy doing some serious yak shaving operations all over the internet, on top of publishing two of my largest LWN articles to date (2017-10-16-strategies-offline-pgp-key-storage and 2017-10-26-comparison-cryptographic-keycards).

feed2exec beta Since I announced this new project last month I have released it as a beta and it entered Debian. I have also wrote useful plugins like the wayback plugin that saves pages on the Wayback machine for eternal archival. The archive plugin can also similarly save pages to the local filesystem. I also added bash completion, expanded unit tests and documentation, fixed default file paths and a bunch of bugs, and refactored the code. Finally, I also started using two external Python libraries instead of rolling my own code: the pyxdg and requests-file libraries, the latter which I packaged in Debian (and fixed a bug in their test suite). The program is working pretty well for me. The only thing I feel is really missing now is a retry/fail mechanism. Right now, it's a little brittle: any network hiccup will yield an error email, which are readable to me but could be confusing to a new user. Strangely enough, I am particularly having trouble with (local!) DNS resolution that I need to look into, but that is probably unrelated with the software itself. Thankfully, the user can disable those with --loglevel=ERROR to silence WARNINGs. Furthermore, some plugins still have some rough edges. For example, The Transmission integration would probably work better as a distinct plugin instead of a simple exec call, because when it adds new torrents, the output is totally cryptic. That plugin could also leverage more feed parameters to save different files in different locations depending on the feed titles, something would be hard to do safely with the exec plugin now. I am keeping a steady flow of releases. I wish there was a way to see how effective I am at reaching out with this project, but unfortunately GitLab doesn't provide usage statistics... And I have received only a few comments on IRC about the project, so maybe I need to reach out more like it says in the fine manual. Always feels strange to have to promote your project like it's some new bubbly soap... Next steps for the project is a final review of the API and release production-ready 1.0.0. I am also thinking of making a small screencast to show the basic capabilities of the software, maybe with asciinema's upcoming audio support?

Pandoc filters As I mentioned earlier, I dove again in Haskell programming when working on the git-annex security update. But I also have a small Haskell program of my own - a Pandoc filter that I use to convert the HTML articles I publish on LWN.net into a Ikiwiki-compatible markdown version. It turns out the script was still missing a bunch of stuff: image sizes, proper table formatting, etc. I also worked hard on automating more bits of the publishing workflow by extracting the time from the article which allowed me to simply extract the full article into an almost final copy just by specifying the article ID. The only thing left is to add tags, and the article is complete. In the process, I learned about new weird Haskell constructs. Take this code, for example:
-- remove needless blockquote wrapper around some tables
--
-- haskell newbie tips:
--
-- @ is the "at-pattern", allows us to define both a name for the
-- construct and inspect the contents as once
--
--   is the "empty record pattern": it basically means "match the
-- arguments but ignore the args"
cleanBlock (BlockQuote t@[Table  ]) = t
Here the idea is to remove <blockquote> elements needlessly wrapping a <table>. I can't specify the Table type on its own, because then I couldn't address the table as a whole, only its parts. I could reconstruct the whole table bits by bits, but it wasn't as clean. The other pattern was how to, at last, address multiple string elements, which was difficult because Pandoc treats spaces specially:
cleanBlock (Plain (Strong (Str "Notifications":Space:Str "for":Space:Str "all":Space:Str "responses":_):_)) = []
The last bit that drove me crazy was the date parsing:
-- the "GAByline" div has a date, use it to generate the ikiwiki dates
--
-- this is distinct from cleanBlock because we do not want to have to
-- deal with time there: it is only here we need it, and we need to
-- pass it in here because we do not want to mess with IO (time is I/O
-- in haskell) all across the function hierarchy
cleanDates :: ZonedTime -> Block -> [Block]
-- this mouthful is just the way the data comes in from
-- LWN/Pandoc. there could be a cleaner way to represent this,
-- possibly with a record, but this is complicated and obscure enough.
cleanDates time (Div (_, [cls], _)
                 [Para [Str month, Space, Str day, Space, Str year], Para _])
    cls == "GAByline" = ikiwikiRawInline (ikiwikiMetaField "date"
                                           (iso8601Format (parseTimeOrError True defaultTimeLocale "%Y-%B-%e,"
                                                           (year ++ "-" ++ month ++ "-" ++ day) :: ZonedTime)))
                        ++ ikiwikiRawInline (ikiwikiMetaField "updated"
                                             (iso8601Format time))
                        ++ [Para []]
-- other elements just pass through
cleanDates time x = [x]
Now that seems just dirty, but it was even worse before. One thing I find difficult in adapting to coding in Haskell is that you need to take the habit of writing smaller functions. The language is really not well adapted to long discourse: it's more about getting small things connected together. Other languages (e.g. Python) discourage this because there's some overhead in calling functions (10 nanoseconds in my tests, but still), whereas functions are a fundamental and important construction in Haskell that are much more heavily optimized. So I constantly need to remind myself to split things up early, otherwise I can't do anything in Haskell. Other languages are more lenient, which does mean my code can be more dirty, but I feel get things done faster then. The oddity of Haskell makes frustrating to work with. It's like doing construction work but you're not allowed to get the floor dirty. When I build stuff, I don't mind things being dirty: I can cleanup afterwards. This is especially critical when you don't actually know how to make things clean in the first place, as Haskell will simply not let you do that at all. And obviously, I fought with Monads, or, more specifically, "I/O" or IO in this case. Turns out that getting the current time is IO in Haskell: indeed, it's not a "pure" function that will always return the same thing. But this means that I would have had to change the signature of all the functions that touched time to include IO. I eventually moved the time initialization up into main so that I had only one IO function and moved that timestamp downwards as simple argument. That way I could keep the rest of the code clean, which seems to be an acceptable pattern. I would of course be happy to get feedback from my Haskell readers (if any) to see how to improve that code. I am always eager to learn.

Git remote MediaWiki Few people know that there is a MediaWiki remote for Git which allow you to mirror a MediaWiki site as a Git repository. As a disaster recovery mechanism, I have been keeping such a historical backup of the Amateur radio wiki for a while now. This originally started as a homegrown Python script to also convert the contents in Markdown. My theory then was to see if we could switch from Mediawiki to Ikiwiki, but it took so long to implement that I never completed the work. When someone had the weird idea of renaming a page to some impossible long name on the wiki, my script broke. I tried to look at fixing it and then remember I also had a mirror running using the Git remote. It turns out it also broke on the same issue and that got me looking in the remote again. I got lost in a zillion issues, including fixing that specific issue, but I especially looked at the possibility of fetching all namespaces because I realized that the remote fetches only a part of the wiki by default. And that drove me to submit namespace support as a patch to the git mailing list. Finally, the discussion came back to how to actually maintain that contrib: in git core or outside? Finally, it looks like I'll be doing some maintenance that project outside of git, as I was granted access to the GitHub organisation...

Galore Yak Shaving Then there's the usual hodgepodge of fixes and random things I did over the month.
There is no [web extension] only XUL! - Inside joke

29 October 2017

Russ Allbery: Review: Why We Sleep

Review: Why We Sleep, by Matthew Walker
Publisher: Scribner
Copyright: October 2017
ISBN: 1-5011-4433-2
Format: Kindle
Pages: 341
The world is full of theories, and corresponding books, about things that will make you healthier or prevent disease. Nearly all of them are scams, either intentional or created through the placebo effect and the human tendency to see patterns that don't exist. The rare ones that aren't have a certain pattern: they're grounded in our best understanding of biology, align with what our body wants to do anyway, have been thoroughly studied using proper testing methodology, and don't make money for powerful corporations. I'm fairly sure this is one of those rare ones that isn't a scam. And, if so, it's rather important and worth your attention. Matthew Walker is a professor of neuroscience and biology at the University of California at Berkeley, where he's the founder of the Center for Human Sleep Science. He's not a doctor; he started medical training, but (as he says in the book) found himself more attracted to questions than answers. He's a professional academic researcher who has been studying sleep for decades. This book is a combination of summary of the current state of knowledge of academic sleep research and a plea: get more sleep, because we're literally killing ourselves with the lack of it. Walker opens the book with a discussion of the mechanisms of sleep: how we biologically fall asleep and why, how this has changed over time, and how it changes with age. Along with that, he defines sleep: the REM and NREM sleep cycle that you may have already heard of, how it manifests itself in most people, and where dreams fit in. The second part then discusses what happens when you sleep, with a focus on what goes wrong when you don't. (Spoiler: A lot. Study after study, all cited and footnoted, has found connections between sleep and just about every aspect of mental and physical health.) The third part does the same for dreams, fitting them into the picture along with a scientific discussion of just what's going on during dreams. The fourth and final part tackles the problem: why don't we get enough sleep, and what can we do about it? I will warn in advance that this book will make you paranoid about your sleeping patterns. Walker has the missionary zeal of an academic who has sunk his teeth into something really important that society needs to take into account and will try to drown you in data, analysis, analogies, and sheer earnestness until you will believe him. He wants you to get at least seven, and preferably eight, hours of sleep a night. Every night, with as little variation as you can manage. Everyone, even if you think you're someone who doesn't need as much sleep (you're probably not). There's a ton of science here, a great popularization of a whole field of research, but this is also a book that's trying to get you to do something. Normally, that sort of book raises my shields. I'm not much of a believer in any book of the general genre of "most people are doing this basic part of life wrong, and should do it my way instead." But the hallmarks of good science are here: very widespread medical consensus, no corporate interest or obvious path to profit, and lots of studies (footnoted here, with some discussions of methodology although not the statistical details, which will require looking up the underlying studies and careful caveats where studies indicate correlation but may not find causes). And Walker makes the very telling point early in the book that nearly every form of life on the planet sleeps in one way or another (defined as a daily recurring period of time during which it doesn't respond to outside stimulus), which is a strong indicator of universal necessity. Given the vulnerability and loss of useful hours that come with sleep, one would expect some species to find an evolutionary path away from it if it were dispensable. But except for extremely short-lived species, we've never found a living creature that didn't sleep. Walker's argument for duration is also backed up by repeated studies on human capability before and after various quantities of sleep, and on studies of the sleep phases in various parts of the night. Study after study used six hours as the cutoff point and showed substantial deterioration in physical and mental capabilities even after only one night of short sleeping. (Reducing sleep to four hours is nearly catastrophic.) And, more worrisomely, that degradation is still measurable after "catching up" on sleep on subsequent nights. Sleeping in on weekends doesn't appear to fully compensate for the damage done by short-sleeping during the week. When Walker gets into the biological reasons for sleep, one starts to understand why it's so important. I think the part I found the most fascinating was the detailed analysis of what the brain is doing while you sleep. It's not inactive at all, even outside of REM sleep. Walker and other sleep researchers have done intriguing experiments showing how different parts of the sleep cycle transfer memories from short to long term storage, transfer physical skills into subconscious parts of the brain, discard short term memories that the conscious brain has tagged as being unwanted, and free up space for new knowledge acquisition. REM sleep appears to attempt to connect otherwise unrelated memories and bits of knowledge, inverting how association normally works in the brain, thus providing some concrete explanation for sleep's role in creativity. And (this research is fairly new), deep NREM sleep causes temporary physical changes in the brain that appear to be involved in flushing metabolic waste products away, including the plaque involved in Alzheimer's. The last part of the book is probably the most concretely useful: what can one practically do to get more sleep? There is quite a lot that's proven effective, but Walker starts with something else: sleeping pills. Here, you can almost see the lines drawn by a lawyer around what Walker should say. He stresses that he's not a medical doctor while laying out study after study that all point in the same direction: sleeping pills are a highly dangerous medical fraud that will shorten your lifespan for negligible benefit in helping you fall asleep, while limiting your brain's ability to enter true sleep. They're sedation, sedation is not sleep, and the four billion dollar sleeping pill market is literally making everything worse. The good news is there is an effective treatment for insomnia that works for many people; the better news is that it's completely free (although Walker does suggest some degree of medical supervision for serious insomnia so that some parts of it can be tailored to you). He walks through CBT-I (cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia), which is now the medically recommended primary treatment for insomnia, and takes apart the pieces to show how they line up with the results of sleep research studies. Alongside that are recommendations for improving sleep for people who don't have clinical insomnia but who aren't regularly getting the recommended amount of sleep. There are a lot of interesting bits here (and he of course talks about blue LED light and its relationship to melatonin cycles), but I think the most interesting for me was that you have to lower your core body temperature by a couple of degrees (Fahrenheit) to enter sleep. The temperature of your sleeping environment is therefore doubly important: temperature changes are one of the signals your body uses to regulate circadian rhythms (cold being a signal of night), and a colder sleeping area helps you lower your core body temperature so that you can fall asleep. (The average person does best with a sleeping room temperature of 65F, 18C.) There's even more in here: I haven't touched on Walker's attack on the US tendency to push high school start times earlier and earlier in the day (particularly devastating for teenagers, whose circadian rhythms move two hours later in the day than adults before slowly returning to an adult cycle). Or the serious problems of waking to an alarm clock, and the important benefits of the sleep that comes at the end of a full night's cycle. Or the benefits of dreams in dealing with trauma and some theories for how PTSD may interfere with that process. Or the effect of sleep on the immune system. Walker's writing style throughout Why We Sleep is engaging and clear, although sometimes too earnest. He really wants the reader to believe him and to get more sleep, and sometimes that leaks around the edges. One can also see the effort he's putting into not reading too much into research studies, but if there's a flaw in the science here, it's that I think Walker takes a few tentative conclusions a bit too far. (I'm sure these studies have the standard research problem of being frequently done on readily-available grad students rather than representative samples of the population, although the universality of sleep works in science's favor here.) Some of the recitations of research studies can get rather dry, and I once again discovered how boring I find most discussion of dreams, but for a first book written by an academic, this is quite readable. This is one of those books that I want everyone to read mostly so that they can get the information in it, not as much for the enjoyment of reading the book itself. I've been paying closer attention to my own sleep patterns for the last few years, and my personal experience lines up neatly with the book in both techniques to get better sleep and the benefits of that sleep. I'd already reached the point where I was cringing when people talk about regularly going on four or five hours of sleep; this is an entire book full of researched reasons to not do that. (Walker points out that both Reagan and Thatcher, who bragged about not requiring much sleep, developed Alzheimer's, and calls out Trump for making the same brag.) The whole book may not be of interest to everyone, but I think everyone should at least understand why the World Heath Organization recommends eight hours a night and labels shift work a probable carcinogen. And, as Walker points out, we should be teaching some of this stuff in school health classes alongside nutrition and sex education. Alas, Walker can't provide much advice on what I think is the largest robber of sleep: the constant time pressure of modern life, in which an uninterrupted nine hour sleep opportunity feels like an unaffordable luxury. Rating: 9 out of 10

24 March 2017

Jo Shields: Mono repository changes, beginning Mono vNext

Up to now, Linux packages on mono-project.com have come in two flavours RPM built for CentOS 7 (and RHEL 7), and .deb built for Debian 7. Universal packages that work on the named distributions, and anything newer. Except that s not entirely true. Firstly, there have been compatibility repositories users need to add, to deal with ABI changes in libtiff, libjpeg, and Apache, since Debian 7. Then there s the packages for ARM64 and PPC64el neither of those architectures is available in Debian 7, so they re published in the 7 repo but actually built on 8. A large reason for this is difficulty in our package publishing pipeline apt only allows one version-architecture mix in the repository at once, so I can t have, say, 4.8.0.520-0xamarin1 built on AMD64 on both Debian 7 and Ubuntu 16.04. We ve been working hard on a new package build/publish pipeline, which can properly support multiple distributions, based on Jenkins Pipeline. This new packaging system also resolves longstanding issues such as can t really build anything except Mono and Architecture: All packages still get built on Jo s laptop, with no public build logs So, here s the old build matrix:
Distribution Architectures
Debian 7 ARM hard float, ARM soft float, ARM64 (actually Debian 8), AMD64, i386, PPC64el (actually Debian 8)
CentOS 7 AMD64
And here s the new one:
Distribution Architectures
Debian 7 ARM hard float (v7), ARM soft float, AMD64, i386
Debian 8 ARM hard float (v7), ARM soft float, ARM64, AMD64, i386, PPC64el
Raspbian 8 ARM hard float (v6)
Ubuntu 14.04 ARM hard float (v7), ARM64, AMD64, i386, PPC64el
Ubuntu 16.04 ARM hard float (v7), ARM64, AMD64, i386, PPC64el
CentOS 6 AMD64, i386
CentOS 7 AMD64
The compatibility repositories will no longer be needed on recent Ubuntu or Debian just use the right repository for your system. If your distribution isn t listed sorry, but we need to draw a line somewhere on support, and the distributions listed here are based on heavy analysis of our web server logs and bug requests. You ll want to change your package manager repositories to reflect your system more accurately, once Mono vNext is published. We re debating some kind of automated handling of this, but I m loathe to touch users sources.list without their knowledge. CentOS builds are going to be late I ve been doing all my prototyping against the Debian builds, as I have better command of the tooling. Hopefully no worse than a week or two. edit I guess Ubuntu 12.04 is coming back too, despite being EOL, for TravisCI support.

4 December 2016

Jo Shields: A quick introduction to Flatpak

Releasing ISV applications on Linux is often hard. The ABI of all the libraries you need changes seemingly weekly. Hence you have the option of bundling the world, or building a thousand releases to cover a thousand distribution versions. As a case in point, when MonoDevelop started bundling a C Git library instead of using a C# git implementation, it gained dependencies on all sorts of fairly weak ABI libraries whose exact ABI mix was not consistent across any given pair of distro releases. This broke our policy of releasing works on anything .deb and .rpm packages. As a result, I pretty much gave up on packaging MonoDevelop upstream with version 5.10. Around the 6.1 release window, I decided to take re-evaluate question. I took a closer look at some of the fancy-pants new distribution methods that get a lot of coverage in the Linux press: Snap, AppImage, and Flatpak. I started with AppImage. It s very good and appealing for its specialist areas (no external requirements for end users), but it s kinda useless at solving some of our big areas (the ABI-vs-bundling problem, updating in general). Next, I looked at Flatpak (once xdg-app). I liked the concept a whole lot. There s a simple 3-tier dependency hierarchy: Applications, Runtimes, and Extensions. An application depends on exactly one runtime. Runtimes are root-level images with no dependencies of their own. Extensions are optional add-ons for applications. Anything not provided in your target runtime, you bundle. And an integrated updates mechanism allows for multiple branches and multiple releases parallel-installed (e.g. alpha & stable, easily switched). There s also security-related sandboxing features, but my main concerns on a first examination were with the dependency and distribution questions. That said, some users might be happier running Microsoft software on their Linux desktop if that software is locked up inside a sandbox, so I ve decided to embrace that functionality rather than seek to avoid it. I basically stopped looking at this point (sorry Snap!). Flatpak provided me with all the functionality I wanted, with an extremely helpful and responsive upstream. I got to work on trying to package up MonoDevelop. Flatpak (optionally!) uses a JSON manifest for building stuff. Because Mono is still largely stuck in a Gtk+2 world, I opted for the simplest runtime, org.freedesktop.Runtime, and bundled stuff like Gtk+ into the application itself. Some gentle patching here & there resulted in this repository. Every time I came up with an exciting new edge case, upstream would suggest a workaround within hours or failing that, added new features to Flatpak just to support my needs (e.g. allowing /dev/kvm to optionally pass through the sandbox). The end result is, as of the upcoming 0.8.0 release of Flatpak, from a clean install of the flatpak package to having a working MonoDevelop is a single command: flatpak install --user --from https://download.mono-project.com/repo/monodevelop.flatpakref For the current 0.6.x versions of Flatpak, the user also needs to flatpak remote-add --user --from gnome https://sdk.gnome.org/gnome.flatpakrepo first this step will be automated in 0.8.0. This will download org.freedesktop.Runtime, then com.xamarin.MonoDevelop; export icons n stuff into your user environment so you can just click to start. There s some lingering experience issues due the sandbox which are on my radar. Run on external console doesn t work, for example, or open containing folder . There are people working on that (a missing DBus# feature to allow breaking out of the sandbox). But overall, I m pretty happy. I won t be entirely satisfied until I have something approximating feature equivalence to the old .debs. I don t think that will ever quite be there, since there s just no rational way to allow arbitrary /usr stuff into the sandbox, but it should provide a decent basis for a QA-able, supportable Linux MonoDevelop. And we can use this work as a starting point for any further fancy features on Linux. Gtk# app development in Flatpak MonoDevelop Editing MonoDevelop in MonoDevelop. *Inception noise*

20 December 2015

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 34 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the reproducible builds effort between December 13th to December 19th: Infrastructure Niels Thykier started implementing support for .buildinfo files in dak. A very preliminary commit was made by Ansgar Burchardt to prevent .buildinfo files from being removed from the upload queue. Toolchain fixes Mattia Rizzolo rebased our experimental debhelper with the changes from the latest upload. New fixes have been merged by OCaml upstream. Packages fixed The following 39 packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: apache-mime4j, avahi-sharp, blam, bless, cecil-flowanalysis, cecil, coco-cs, cowbell, cppformat, dbus-sharp-glib, dbus-sharp, gdcm, gnome-keyring-sharp, gudev-sharp-1.0, jackson-annotations, jackson-core, jboss-classfilewriter, jboss-jdeparser2, jetty8, json-spirit, lat, leveldb-sharp, libdecentxml-java, libjavaewah-java, libkarma, mono.reflection, monobristol, nuget, pinta, snakeyaml, taglib-sharp, tangerine, themonospot, tomboy-latex, widemargin, wordpress, xsddiagram, xsp, zeitgeist-sharp. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet: reproducible.debian.net Packages in experimental are now tested on armhf. (h01ger) Arch Linux packages in the multilib and community repositories (4,000 more source packages) are also being tested. All of these test results are better analyzed and nicely displayed together with each package. (h01ger) For Fedora, build jobs can now run in parallel. Two are currently running, now testing reproducibility of 785 source packages from Fedora 23. mock/1.2.3-1.1 has been uploaded to experimental to better build RPMs. (h01ger) Work has started on having automatic build node pools to maximize use of armhf build nodes. (Vagrant Cascadian) diffoscope development Version 43 has been released on December 15th. It has been dubbed as epic! as it contains many contributions that were written around the summit in Athens. Baptiste Daroussin found that running diffoscope on some Tar archives could overwrite arbitrary files. This has been fixed by using libarchive instead of Python internal Tar library and adding a sanity check for destination paths. In any cases, until proper sandboxing is implemented, don't run diffosope on unstrusted inputs outside an isolated, throw-away system. Mike Hommey identified that the CBFS comparator would needlessly waste time scanning big files. It will now not consider any files bigger than 24 MiB 8 MiB more than the largest ROM created by coreboot at this time. An encoding issue related to Zip files has also been fixed. (Lunar) New comparators have been added: Android dex files (Reiner Herrmann), filesystem images using libguestfs (Reiner Herrmann), icons and JPEG images using libcaca (Chris Lamb), and OS X binaries (Clemens Lang). The comparator for Free Pascal Compilation Unit will now only be used when the unit version matches the compiler one. (Levente Polyak) A new multi-file HTML output with on-demand loading of long diffs is available through the --html-dir option. On-demand loading requires jQuery which path can be specified through the --jquery option. The diffs can also be simply browsed for non-JavaScript users or when jQuery is not available. (Joachim Breitner) Example of on-demand loading in diffosope Portability toward other systems has been improved: old versions of GNU diff are now supported (Mike McQuaid), suggestion of the appropriate locale is now the more generic en_US.UTF-8 (Ed Maste), the --list-tools option can now support multiple systems (Mattia Rizzolo, Levente Polyak, Lunar). Many internal changes and code clean-ups have been made, paving the way for parallel processing. (Lunar) Version 44 was released on December 18th fixing an issue affecting .deb lacking a md5sums file introduced in a previous refactoring (Lunar). Support has been added for Mozilla optimized Zip files. (Mike Hommey). The HTML output has been optimized in size (Mike Hommey, Esa Peuha, Lunar), speed (Lunar), and will now properly number lines (Mike Hommey). A message will always be displayed when lines are ignored at the end of a diff (Lunar). For portability and consistency, Python os.walk() function is now used instead of find to perform directory listing. (Lunar) Documentation update Package reviews 143 reviews have been removed, 69 added and 22 updated in the previous week. Chris Lamb reported 12 new FTBFS issues. News issues identified this week: random_order_in_init_py_generated_by_python-genpy, timestamps_in_copyright_added_by_perl_dist_zilla, random_contents_in_dat_files_generated_by_chasen-dictutils_makemat, timestamps_in_documentation_generated_by_pandoc. Chris West did some improvements on the scripts used to manage notes in the misc repository. Misc. Accounts of the reproducible builds summit in Athens were written by Thomas Klausner from NetBSD and Hans-Christoph Steiner from The Guardian Project. Some openSUSE developers are working on a hackweek on reproducible builds which was discussed on the opensuse-packaging mailing-list.

2 June 2015

Jo Shields: mono-project.com Linux packages, June 2015 edition

The latest stable release of Mono has happened, the first bugfix update to our 4.0 branch. Here are the release highlights, and some other goodies. Stable Packages This release covers Mono 4.0.1, and MonoDevelop 5.9. As promised last time, this includes builds for RPM-based x64 systems (CentOS 7 minimum), Debian-based x64, i386, ARMv5 Soft Float, and ARMv7 Hard Float systems (Debian 7/Ubuntu 12.04 minimum). Version numbering From now on, we re going to be clearer with our version numbering scheme. Historically, we ve shipped, say, 4.0.0 to the public internally, there have been a lot of builds on this target branch, all of which get an internal revision number. 4.0.0 as-shipped was in fact 4.0.0.143 internally that was the first 4.0.0 branch release approved of for stable release. This release is the first service release on the 4.0.0 branch, numbered 4.0.1.44 it ll be officially referred to as 4.0.1 in some places, but isn t the same as 4.0.1.0, which already released on Linux/Windows a while back, to include an emergency bugfix for those platforms. That was sorta a screwup really. Using the 4-part version removes the ambiguity, rather than having 44 different 4.0.1 s in existence. And we ll aim to be clearer in future about what is alpha, what is beta, and what is final (and what is a random emergency snapshot). Alpha Linux packages Want to see things earlier? We ve now got the structure in place to provide Linux packages (and source releases) to mirror what we do on Mac. When we upload a prospective package to our Mac customers, we will automatically trigger builds for Linux too. See http://www.mono-project.com/download/alpha/ Beta Linux packages See above. s/alpha/beta/. Weekly git Master snapshots We already have packages in place for every git commit, which parallel-install Mono into /opt. This is different. Weekly (or, right now, when I manually run the requisite Jenkins job), the latest Mac build of Mono git master from our internal CI system will be copied to a public location just for you, a source tarball generated, and packages built. See here for info on making use of that.
directhex@marceline:~$ mono --version
Mono JIT compiler version 4.3.0 (Nightly 4.3.0.21/88d2b9d Thu May 28 10:54:32 UTC 2015)

5 May 2015

Miriam Ruiz: SuperTuxKart 0.9: The other side of the story

I approached the SuperTuxKart community fearing some backslash due to last week s discussion about their release 0.9, to find instead a nice, friendly and welcoming community. I have already had some very nice talks with them since then, and they have patiently explained to me the sequence of events that led to the situation that I mentioned and that, for the sake of fairness, I consider that I have to share here too. You can read the log of the first conversation I had with them (the log has been edited and cleared up for clarity and readability). I seriously recommend reading it, it s a honest friendly conversation, and it s first hand. For those who don t already know the game:

All this story seems to start with the complain of a 6 yo girl, close relative of one of the developers and STK user, who explained that she always felt that Mario Kart was better because there was a princess in it. I m not particularly happy with princesses as role models for girls, but one thing I have always said is that we have to listen to kids and take their opinions into accounts, and I know that if I had such a request from one of the kids closer to me, I probably would have fulfilled it too. In any case, Free Software projects based on volunteer work are essentially a do-ocracy and it is assumed that whoever does the work, gets to decide about it.

So that is how Princess Sara was added to the game. While developing it, I was assured that they took extra care that her proportions were somehow realistic, and not as distorted as we re used to see in Barbie or many Disney films. Sara is inspired on an OpenGameArt s wizard and is not supposed to be a weak damsel in distress, but in fact a powerful character in the world s universe.

Sara is not the only female character playable. There are a few others: Suzanne (a monkey, Blender s mascot), Xue (XFCE s mouse) and Amanda (a panda, the mascot of windows maker). Sara happens to be the only human character playable, male or female. While it has been argued that by adding that character, a player might have the impression that the rest of the characters would be male by default, I have been told that the intention is exactly the opposite,and that the fact that the only human playable character in the game is female should make it more attractive to girls. To some, at least. Here are some images of Sara:

So the fact is that they have invested a lot of time in developing Sara s model. I m not an artist myself, so I don t know first hand how much time and effort it takes to make such a model, but in any case it seems that quite a lot. When they designed the beach track Gran Paradiso, they wanted to add people to the beach. That track is, in fact, inspired on a real existing place: Princess Juliana Airport. Time was over and they wanted to publish a version with what they already had, so they used Sara s model in a bikini on the beach, with the intention of adding more people, male and female, later. The overall view of the beach would be:

This is how that track shows when the players are driving in it:

Now, about the poster of version 0.9, it is supposed to be inspired in the previous poster of version 0.8.1, only this time inspired in Carnival (which is, in fact, a celebration in which sexualization of both genders is a core part). I know that there are accusations of cultural apropriation, but I couldn t know, as my white privilege probably shields me from seeing that. Up to now, no one has said anything about that, only Gunnar explaining his point of view as a non-native mexican: While the poster does not strike as the most cautious possible, I do not see it as culturally offensive. It does not attempt to set a scene portraiting what were the cultures really like; the portrait it paints is similar to so many fantasy recreations . In my opinion, even when the model is done in good taste, with no superbig breasts and no unrealistic waist, it s still depicting a girl without much clothes as the main element of the scene, with an attire, a posture and an attitude that clearly resembles carnival and, thus, inevitably conveys a message of sexualization. Even though I can t deny that it s a cute poster, it s one I wouldn t be happy to see for example in a school, if someone wanted to promote the game there. The author of the poster, anyway, tells me that he had a totally different intention when doing it, and he wanted to depict a powerful princess, in the center of SuperTuxKart s universe, celebrating the new engine.

About the panties showing every now and then, I ve been told that it s something so hard to see that in fact you would really have to open the model itself to view them. I m not saying that I like them though, I think it would have been better if Sara would have had short pants under the skirt, if she was going to drive the snowmobile with a dress, but I m not sure if that s something important enough to condemn the game. The original girl mentioned at the beginning of this post seems to have found the animation funny, started laughing, and said that Sara is very silly, and that was all. It s probably something more silly than naughty, I guess. Even though, as I said, it s something I don t like too much. I don t have to agree with STK developers in everything. I guess.

There s one thing I would like to highlight about my conversations with the developers of SuperTuxKart, though. I like them. They seem to be as concerned about the wellbeing of kids as I am, they have their own ethic norms of what s acceptable and what s not, and they want to do something to be proud of. Sometimes, many of these conflicts arise from a lack of trust. When I first saw the screenshots with the girl in bikini and the panties showing, I was honestly concerned about the direction the project was taking. After having talked with the developers, I am more calmed about it, because they seem to have their heart in the right place, they care, they are motivated and they work hard. I don t know if a princess would be my first choice for a main female character, but at least their intention seems to be to give some girls a sensible role model in the game with who they can identify.

21 January 2015

Jo Shields: mono-project.com Linux packages, January 2015 edition

The latest version of Mono has released (actually, it happened a week ago, but it took me a while to get all sorts of exciting new features bug-checked and shipshape). Stable packages This release covers Mono 3.12, and MonoDevelop 5.7. These are built for all the same targets as last time, with a few caveats (MonoDevelop does not include F# or ASP.NET MVC 4 support). ARM packages will be added in a few weeks time, when I get the new ARM build farm working at Xamarin s Boston office. Ahead-of-time support This probably seems silly since upstream Mono has included it for years, but Mono on Debian has never shipped with AOT d mscorlib.dll or mcs.exe, for awkward package-management reasons. Mono 3.12 fixes this, and will AOT these assemblies optimized for your computer on installation. If you can suggest any other assemblies to add to the list, we now support a simple manifest structure so any assembly can be arbitrarily AOT d on installation. Goodbye Mozroots! I am very pleased to announce that as of this release, Mono users on Linux no longer need to run mozroots to get SSL working. A new command, cert-sync , has been added to this release, which synchronizes the Mono SSL certificate store against your OS certificate store and this tool has been integrated into the packaging system for all mono-project.com packages, so it is automatically used. Just make sure the ca-certificates-mono package is installed on Debian/Ubuntu (it s always bundled on RPM-based) to take advantage! It should be installed on fresh installs by default. If you want to invoke the tool manually (e.g. you installed via make install, not packages) use
cert-sync /path/to/ca-bundle.crt
On Debian systems, that s
cert-sync /etc/ssl/certs/ca-certificates.crt
and on Red Hat derivatives it s
cert-sync /etc/pki/tls/certs/ca-bundle.crt
Your distribution might use a different path, if it s not derived from one of those. Windows installer back from the dead Thanks to help from Alex Koeplinger, I ve brought the Windows installer back from the dead. The last release on the website was for 3.2.3 (it s actually not this version at all it s complicated ), so now the Windows installer has parity with the Linux and OSX versions. The Windows installer (should!) bundles everything the Mac version does F#, PCL facades, IronWhatever, etc, along with Boehm and SGen builds of the Mono runtime done with Visual Studio 2013. An EXPERIMENTAL OH MY GOD DON T USE THIS IN PRODUCTION 64-bit installer is in the works, when I have the time to try and make a 64-build of Gtk#.

15 January 2015

Michal &#268;iha&#345;: Weblate UI polishing

After releasing Weblate 2.0 with Bootstrap based UI, there was still lot of things to improve. Weblate 2.1 brought more consistency in using buttons with colors and icons. Weblate 2.2 will bring some improvements in other graphics elements. One of thing which was for quite long in our issue tracker is to provide own renderer for SVG status badge. So far Weblate has offered either PNG badge or external SVG rendered by shields.io. Relying on external service was not good in a long term and also caused requests to third party server on many pages, what could be considered bad privacy wise. Since this week, Weblate can render SVG badge on it's own and they are also matching current style used by other services (eg. Travis CI): Translation status One last thing which really did not fit into new UI were activity charts. In past they were rendered as PNG on server side, but for upcoming releases we have switched to use Chartist javascript library and render them as SVG on client side. This way we can nicely style them to fit into page, they scale properly and also reduce server load. You can see them in action on Hosted Weblate server: Weblate activity chart

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15 November 2014

Jo Shields: mono-project.com Linux packages an update

It s been pointed out to me that many people aren t aware of the current status of Linux packages on mono-project.com, so I m here s a summary: Stable packages Mono 3.10.0, MonoDevelop 5.5.0.227, NuGet 2.8.1 and F# 3.1.1.26 packages are available. Plus related bits. MonoDevelop on Linux does not currently include the F# addin (there are a lot of pieces to get in place for this to work). These are built for x86-64 CentOS 7, and should be compatible with RHEL 7, openSUSE 12.3, and derivatives. I haven t set up a SUSE 1-click install file yet, but I ll do it next week if someone reminds me. They are also built for Debian 7 on i386, x86-64, and IBM zSeries processors. The same packages ought to work on Ubuntu 12.04 and above, and any derivatives of Debian or Ubuntu. Due to ABI changes, you need to add a second compatibility extension repository for Ubuntu 12.04 or 12.10 to get anything to work, and a different compatibility extension repository for Debian derivatives with Apache 2.4 if you want the mod-mono ASP.NET Apache module (Debian 8+, Ubuntu 13.10+, and derivatives, will need this).
MonoDevelop 5.5 on Ubuntu 14.04

MonoDevelop 5.5 on Ubuntu 14.04

In general, see the install guide to get these going. Docker You may have seen Microsoft recently posting a guide to using ASP.NET 5 on Docker. Close inspection would show that this Docker image is based on our shiny new Xamarin Mono docker image, which is based on Debian 7.The full details are on Docker Hub, but the short version is docker pull mono:latest gets you an image with the very latest Mono.
directhex@desire:~$ docker pull mono:latest
Pulling repository mono
9da8fc8d2ff5: Download complete 
511136ea3c5a: Download complete 
f10807909bc5: Download complete 
f6fab3b798be: Download complete 
3c43ebb7883b: Download complete 
7a1f8e485667: Download complete 
a342319da8ea: Download complete 
3774d7ea06a6: Download complete 
directhex@desire:~$ docker run -i -t mono:latest mono --version 
Mono JIT compiler version 3.10.0 (tarball Wed Nov  5 12:50:04 UTC 2014)
Copyright (C) 2002-2014 Novell, Inc, Xamarin Inc and Contributors. www.mono-project.com
	TLS:           __thread
	SIGSEGV:       altstack
	Notifications: epoll
	Architecture:  amd64
	Disabled:      none
	Misc:          softdebug 
	LLVM:          supported, not enabled.
	GC:            sgen
The Dockerfiles are on GitHub.

4 October 2014

Jo Shields: The unstoppable march of mobile technology

It s been more than 2 years since my last post about my smartphone. In the time after that post I upgraded my much loved Windows Phone 7 device to Windows Phone 8 (which I got rid of within months, for sucking), briefly used Firefox OS, then eventually used a Nexus 4 for at least a year. After years of terrible service provision and pricing, I decided I would not stay with my network Orange a moment longer and in getting a new contract, I would get a new phone too. So on Friday, I signed up to a new 15 per month contract with Three, including 200 minutes, unlimited data, and 25GB of data roaming in the USA and other countries (a saving of 200,000 per month versus Orange). Giffgaff is similarly competitive for data, but not roaming. No other network in the UK is competitive. For the phone, I had a shortlist of three: Apple iPhone 6, Sony Xperia Z3 Compact, and Samsung Galaxy Alpha. These are all small phones by 2014 standards, with a screen about the same size as the Nexus 4. I didn t consider any Windows Phone devices because they still haven t shipped a functional music player app on Windows Phone 8. Other more fringe OSes weren t considered, as I insist on trying out a real device in person before purchase, and no other comparable devices are testable on the high street. iPhone 6 This was the weakest offering, for me. 120 more than the Samsung, and almost 200 more than the Sony, a much lower hardware specification, physically larger, less attractive, and worst of all mandatory use of iTunes for Windows for music syncing.
iPhone6_PF_SpGry_iPhone6_PB_SpGry_iPhone6_PSL_SpGry_Homescreen-PRINT

Apple iPhone 6, press shot from apple.com, all rights reserved

The only real selling point for me would be for access to iPhone apps. And, I guess, decreased chance of mockery by co-workers. Galaxy Alpha Now on to the real choices. I ve long felt that Samsung s phones are ugly plasticy tat the Galaxy S5 is popular, well-marketed, but looks and feels cheap compared to HTC s unibody aluminium One. They ve also committed the cardinal sin of gimping the specifications of their mini (normal-sized) phones, compared to the normal (gargantuan) versions. The newly released S5 Mini is about the same spec as early 2012 s S3, the S4 Mini was mostly an S2 internally, and so on. However, whilst HTC have continued along these lines, Samsung have finally released a proper phone under 5 , in the Alpha.
Samsung Galaxy Alpha press shot from samsungmobile.com, all rights reserved

Samsung Galaxy Alpha press shot from samsungmobile.com, all rights reserved

The Alpha combines a 4.7 AMOLED screen, a plastic back, metal edges, 8-core big.LITTLE processor, and 2GB RAM. It is a PRETTY device the screen really dazzles (as is the nature of OLED). It feels like a mix of design cues from an iPhone and Samsung s own, keeping the angular feel of iPhone 4->5S rather than the curved edges on the iPhone 6. The Galaxy Alpha was one of the two devices I seriously considered. Xperia Z3 Compact The other Android device I considered was the Compact version of Sony s new Xperia Z3. Unlike other Android vendors, Sony decided that mini shouldn t mean low end when they released the Z1 compact earlier this year. The Z3 follows suit, where the same CPU and storage are found on both the big and little versions.
Sony Xperia Z3 Compact press shot from Sony Xperia Picasa album. CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Sony Xperia Z3 Compact press shot from Sony Xperia Picasa album. CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

The Z3C has a similar construction to the Nexus 4, with glass front and back, and plastic rim. The specification is similar to the Galaxy Alpha (with a quadcore 2.5GHz Qualcomm processor about 15% faster than the big.LITTLE Exynos in the Galaxy Alpha). It differs in a few places LCD rather than AMOLED (bad); a non-removable (bad) 2600 mAh battery (good) compared to the removable 1860 mAh in the Samsung; waterproofing (good); A less hateful Android shell (Xperia on Android vs Samsung Touchwiz). For those considering a Nexus-4-replacement class device (yes, rjek, that means you), both the Samsung and the Sony are worth a look. They both have good points and bad points. In the end, both need to be tested to form a proper opinion. But for me, the chunky battery and tasteful green were enough to swing it for the Sony. So let s see where I stand in a few months time. Every phone I ve owned, I ve ended up hating it for one reason or another. My usual measure for whether a phone is good or not is how long it takes me to hit the I can t use this limit. The Nokia N900 took me about 30 minutes, the Lumia 800 lasted months. How will the Z3 Compact do? Time will tell.

1 September 2014

Jo Shields: Xamarin Apt and Yum repos now open for testing

Howdy y all Two of the main things I ve been working on since I started at Xamarin are making it easier for people to try out the latest bleeding-edge Mono, and making it easier for people on older distributions to upgrade Mono without upgrading their entire OS. Public Jenkins packages Every time anyone commits to Mono git master or MonoDevelop git master, our public Jenkins will try and turn those into packages, and add them to repositories. There s a garbage collection policy currently the 20 most recent builds are always kept, then the first build of the month for everything older than 20 builds. Because we re talking potentially broken packages here, I wrote a simple environment mangling script called mono-snapshot. When you install a Jenkins package, mono-snapshot will also be installed and configured. This allows you to have multiple Mono versions installed at once, for easy bug bisecting.
directhex@marceline:~$ mono --version
Mono JIT compiler version 3.6.0 (tarball Wed Aug 20 13:05:36 UTC 2014)
directhex@marceline:~$ . mono-snapshot mono
[mono-20140828234844]directhex@marceline:~$ mono --version
Mono JIT compiler version 3.8.1 (tarball Fri Aug 29 07:11:20 UTC 2014)
The instructions for setting up the Jenkins packages are on the new Mono web site, specifically here. The packages are built on CentOS 7 x64, Debian 7 x64, and Debian 7 i386 they should work on most newer distributions or derivatives. Stable release packages This has taken a bit longer to get working. The aim is to offer packages in our Apt/Yum repositories for every Mono release, in a timely fashion, more or less around the same time as the Mac installers are released. Info for setting this up is, again, on the new website. Like the Jenkins packages, they are designed as far as I am able to cleanly integrate with different versions of major popular distributions though there are a few instances of ABI breakage in there which I have opted to fix using one evil method rather than another evil method. Please note that these are still at preview or beta quality, and shouldn t be considered usable in major production environments until I get a bit more user feedback. The RPM packages especially are super new, and I haven t tested them exhaustively at this point I d welcome feedback. I hope to remove the testing!!! warning labels from these packages soon, but that relies on user feedback to my xamarin.com account preferably (jo.shields@)

19 July 2014

Jo Shields: Transition tracker

Friday was my last day at Collabora, the awesome Open Source consultancy in Cambridge. I d been there more than three years, and it was time for a change. As luck would have it, that change came in the form of a job offer 3 months ago from my long-time friend in Open Source, Miguel de Icaza. Monday morning, I fly out to Xamarin s main office in Boston, for just over a week of induction and face time with my new co workers, as I take on the title of Release Engineer. My job is to make sure Mono on Linux is a first-class citizen, rather than the best-effort it s been since Xamarin was formed from the ashes of the Attachmate/Novell deal. I m thrilled to work full-time on what I do already as community work including making Mono great on Debian/Ubuntu and hope to form new links with the packer communities in other major distributions. And I m delighted that Xamarin has chosen to put its money where its mouth is and fund continued Open Source development surrounding Mono. If you re in the Boston area next week or the week after, ping me via the usual methods! IMG_20140719_203043

6 May 2014

Michal &#268;iha&#345;: Weblate 1.9

Weblate 1.9 has been released today. It comes with lot of improvements and bug fixes and with experimental Zen mode for editing translations. Full list of changes for 1.9: You can find more information about Weblate on http://weblate.org, the code is hosted on Github. If you are curious how it looks, you can try it out on demo server. You can login there with demo account using demo password or register your own user. Ready to run appliances will be soon available in SUSE Studio Gallery. Weblate is also being used https://l10n.cihar.com/ as official translating service for phpMyAdmin, Gammu, Weblate itself and others. If you are free software project which would like to use Weblate, I'm happy to help you with set up or even host Weblate for you. Further development of Weblate would not be possible without people providing donations, thanks to everybody who have helped so far!

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21 March 2014

Jo Shields: Stephenson s Rocket the new name for Ye Olde SteamOSe

I ve made a new release of my curiously popular SteamOS derivative, and given it a new name: Stephenson s Rocket. Stephenson's Rocket You can download the new release from here. Release highlights:

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