Search Results: "reichel"

12 May 2020

Evgeni Golov: Building a Shelly 2.5 USB to TTL adapter cable

When you want to flash your Shelly 2.5 with anything but the original firmware for the first time, you'll need to attach it to your computer. Later flashes can happen over the air (at least with ESPHome or Tasmota), but the first one cannot. In theory, this is not a problem as the Shelly has a quite exposed and well documented interface: Shelly 2.5 pinout However, on closer inspection you'll notice that your normal jumper wires don't fit as the Shelly has a connector with 1.27mm (0.05in) pitch and 1mm diameter holes. Now, there are various tutorials on the Internet how to build a compatible connector using Ethernet cables and hot glue or with female header socket legs, and you can even buy cables on Amazon for 18 ! But 18 sounded like a lot and the female header socket thing while working was pretty finicky to use, so I decided to build something different. We'll need 6 female-to-female jumper wires and a 1.27mm pitch male header. Jumper wires I had at home, the header I got is a SL 1X20G 1,27 from reichelt.de for 0.61 . It's a 20 pin one, so we can make 3 adapters out of it if needed. Oh and we'll need some isolation tape. SL 1X20G 1,27 The first step is to cut the header into 6 pin chunks. Make sure not to cut too close to the 6th pin as the whole thing is rather fragile and you might lose it. SL 1X20G 1,27 cut into pieces It now fits very well into the Shelly with the longer side of the pins. Shelly 2.5 with pin headers attached Second step is to strip the plastic part of one side of the jumper wires. Those are designed to fit 2.54mm pitch headers and won't work for our use case otherwise. jumper wire with removed plastic As the connectors are still too big, even after removing the plastic, the next step is to take some pliers and gently press the connectors until they fit the smaller pins of our header. Shelly 2.5 with pin headers and a jumper wire attached Now is the time to put everything together. To avoid short circuiting the pins/connectors, apply some isolation tape while assembling, but not too much as the space is really limited. Shelly 2.5 with pin headers and a jumper wire attached and taped And we're done, a wonderful (lol) and working (yay) Shelly 2.5 cable that can be attached to any USB-TTL adapter, like the pictured FTDI clone you get almost everywhere. Shelly 2.5 with full cable and FTDI attached Yes, in an ideal world we would have soldered the header to the cable, but I didn't feel like soldering on that limited space. And yes, shrink-wrap might be a good thing too, but again, limited space and with isolation tape you only need one layer between two pins, not two.

27 April 2017

Steinar H. Gunderson: Chinese HDMI-to-SDI converters, part II

Following up on my previous post, I have only a few small nuggets of extra information: The power draw appears to be 230 240 mA at 5 V, or about 1.15 W. (It doesn't matter whether they have a signal or not.) This means you can power them off of a regular USB power bank; in a recent test, we used Deltaco 20000 mAh (at 3.7 V) power banks, which are supposed to power a GoPro plus such a converter for somewhere between 8 12 hours (we haven't measured exactly). It worked brilliantly, and solved a headache of how to get AC to the camera and converter; just slap on a power bank instead, and all you need to run is SDI. Curiously enough, 230 mA is so little that the power bank thinks it doesn't count as load, and just turns itself off after ten seconds or so. However, with the GoPro also active, it stays on all the time. At least it ran for the two hours that we needed without a hitch. The SDI converters don't accept USB directly, but you can purchase dumb USB-to-5.5x2.1mm converters cheap from wherever, which works fine even though USB is supposed to give you only 100 mA without handshaking. Some eBay sellers seem to include them with the converters, even. I guess the power bank just doesn't care; it's spec-ed to 2.1 A on two ports and 1 A on the last one. Update: Sebastian Reichel pointed out that USB 2.0 ups the limit to 500 mA, so you should be within spec in any case. :-) And here's a picture of the entire contraption as a bonus: Power bank and HDMI-to-SDI converter

24 October 2016

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 78 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday October 16 and Saturday October 22 2016: Media coverage Upcoming events buildinfo.debian.net In order to build packages reproducibly, you not only need identical sources but also some external definition of the environment used for a particular build. This definition includes the inputs and the outputs and, in the Debian case, are available in a $package_$architecture_$version.buildinfo file. We anticipate the next dpkg upload to sid will create .buildinfo files by default. Whilst it's clear that we also need to teach dak to deal with them (#763822) its not actually clear how to handle .buildinfo files after dak has processed them and how to make them available to the world. To this end, Chris Lamb has started development on a proof-of-concept .buildinfo server to see what issues arise. Source Reproducible work in other projects Packages reviewed and fixed, and bugs filed Reviews of unreproducible packages 99 package reviews have been added, 3 have been updated and 6 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. 6 issue types have been added: Weekly QA work During of reproducibility testing, some FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by: diffoscope development tests.reproducible-builds.org Misc. Our poll to find a good time for an IRC meeting is still running until Tuesday, October 25st; please reply as soon as possible. We need a logo! Some ideas and requirements for a Reproducible Builds logo have been documented in the wiki. Contributions very welcome, even if simply by forwarding this information. This week's edition was written by Chris Lamb & Holger Levsen and reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC.

6 October 2016

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 75 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday September 25 and Saturday October 1 2016: Statistics For the first time, we reached 91% reproducible packages in our testing framework on testing/amd64 using a determistic build path. (This is what we recommend to make packages in Stretch reproducible.) For unstable/amd64, where we additionally test for reproducibility across different build paths we are at almost 76% again. IRC meetings We have a poll to set a time for a new regular IRC meeting. If you would like to attend, please input your available times and we will try to accommodate for you. There was a trial IRC meeting on Friday, 2016-09-31 1800 UTC. Unfortunately, we did not activate meetbot. Despite this participants consider the meeting a success as several topics where discussed (eg changes to IRC notifications of tests.r-b.o) and the meeting stayed within one our length. Upcoming events Reproduce and Verify Filesystems - Vincent Batts, Red Hat - Berlin (Germany), 5th October, 14:30 - 15:20 @ LinuxCon + ContainerCon Europe 2016. From Reproducible Debian builds to Reproducible OpenWrt, LEDE & coreboot - Holger "h01ger" Levsen and Alexander "lynxis" Couzens - Berlin (Germany), 13th October, 11:00 - 11:25 @ OpenWrt Summit 2016. Introduction to Reproducible Builds - Vagrant Cascadian will be presenting at the SeaGL.org Conference In Seattle (USA), November 11th-12th, 2016. Previous events GHC Determinism - Bartosz Nitka, Facebook - Nara (Japan), 24th September, ICPF 2016. Toolchain development and fixes Michael Meskes uploaded bsdmainutils/9.0.11 to unstable with a fix for #830259 based on Reiner Herrmann's patch. This fixed locale_dependent_symbol_order_by_lorder issue in the affected packages (freebsd-libs, mmh). devscripts/2.16.8 was uploaded to unstable. It includes a debrepro script by Antonio Terceiro which is similar in purpose to reprotest but more lightweight; specific to Debian packages and without support for virtual servers or configurable variations. Packages reviewed and fixed, and bugs filed The following updated packages have become reproducible in our testing framework after being fixed: The following updated packages appear to be reproducible now for reasons we were not able to figure out. (Relevant changelogs did not mention reproducible builds.) Some uploads have addressed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Patches submitted that have not made their way to the archive yet: Reviews of unreproducible packages 77 package reviews have been added, 178 have been updated and 80 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. 6 issue types have been updated: Weekly QA work As part of reproducibility testing, FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by: diffoscope development A new version of diffoscope 61 was uploaded to unstable by Chris Lamb. It included contributions from: Post-release there were further contributions from: reprotest development A new version of reprotest 0.3.2 was uploaded to unstable by Ximin Luo. It included contributions from: Post-release there were further contributions from: tests.reproducible-builds.org Misc. This week's edition was written by Ximin Luo, Holger Levsen & Chris Lamb and reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC.

7 September 2016

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 71 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday August 28 and Saturday September 3 2016: Media coverage Antonio Terceiro blogged about testing build reprodubility with debrepro . GSoC and Outreachy updates The next round is being planned now: see their page with a timeline and participating organizations listing. Maybe you want to participate this time? Then please reach out to us as soon as possible! Packages reviewed and fixed, and bugs filed The following packages have addressed reproducibility issues in other packages: The following updated packages have become reproducible in our current test setup after being fixed: The following updated packages appear to be reproducible now, for reasons we were not able to figure out yet. (Relevant changelogs did not mention reproducible builds.) The following 4 packages were not changed, but have become reproducible due to changes in their build-dependencies: Some uploads have addressed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Patches submitted that have not made their way to the archive yet: Reviews of unreproducible packages 706 package reviews have been added, 22 have been updated and 16 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. 5 issue types have been added: 1 issue type has been updated: Weekly QA work FTBFS bugs have been reported by: diffoscope development diffoscope development on the next version (60) continued in git, taking in contributions from: strip-nondeterminism development Mattia Rizzolo uploaded strip-nondeterminism 0.023-2~bpo8+1 to jessie-backports. A new version of strip-nondeterminism 0.024-1 was uploaded to unstable by Chris Lamb. It included contributions from: Holger added jobs on jenkins.debian.net to run testsuites on every commit. There is one job for the master branch and one for the other branches. disorderfs development Holger added jobs on jenkins.debian.net to run testsuites on every commit. There is one job for the master branch and one for the other branches. tests.reproducible-builds.org Debian: We now vary the GECOS records of the two build users. Thanks to Paul Wise for providing the patch. Misc. This week's edition was written by Ximin Luo, Holger Levsen & Chris Lamb and reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC.

8 June 2016

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible builds: week 58 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between May 29th and June 4th 2016: Media coverage Ed Maste will present Reproducible Builds in FreeBSD at BDSCan 2016 in Ottawa, Canada on June 11th. GSoC and Outreachy updates Toolchain fixes Other upstream fixes Packages fixed The following 53 packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build-dependencies: angband blktrace code-saturne coinor-symphony device-tree-compiler mpich rtslib ruby-bcrypt ruby-bson-ext ruby-byebug ruby-cairo ruby-charlock-holmes ruby-curb ruby-dataobjects-sqlite3 ruby-escape-utils ruby-ferret ruby-ffi ruby-fusefs ruby-github-markdown ruby-god ruby-gsl ruby-hdfeos5 ruby-hiredis ruby-hitimes ruby-hpricot ruby-kgio ruby-lapack ruby-ldap ruby-libvirt ruby-libxml ruby-msgpack ruby-ncurses ruby-nfc ruby-nio4r ruby-nokogiri ruby-odbc ruby-oj ruby-ox ruby-raindrops ruby-rdiscount ruby-redcarpet ruby-redcloth ruby-rinku ruby-rjb ruby-rmagick ruby-rugged ruby-sdl ruby-serialport ruby-sqlite3 ruby-unicode ruby-yajl ruby-zoom thin The following packages have become reproducible after being fixed: Some uploads have addressed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Uploads with an unknown result because they fail to build: Patches submitted that have not made their way to the archive yet: Package reviews 45 reviews have been added, 25 have been updated and 25 have been removed in this week. 12 FTBFS bugs have been reported by Chris Lamb and Niko Tyni. diffoscope development strip-nondeterminism development Mattia uploaded strip-nondeterminism 0.018-1 which improved support for *.epub files. tests.reproducible-builds.org Misc. Last week we also learned about progress of reproducible builds in FreeBSD. Ed Maste announced a change to record the build timestamp during ports building, which is required for later reproduction. This week's edition was written by Reiner Herrman, Holger Levsen and Chris Lamb and reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible builds folks on IRC.

17 May 2016

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible builds: week 55 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between May 8th and May 14th 2016: Documentation updates Toolchain fixes Packages fixed The following 28 packages have become newly reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: actor-framework ask asterisk-prompt-fr-armelle asterisk-prompt-fr-proformatique coccinelle cwebx d-itg device-tree-compiler flann fortunes-es idlastro jabref konclude latexdiff libint minlog modplugtools mummer mwrap mxallowd mysql-mmm ocaml-atd ocamlviz postbooks pycorrfit pyscanfcs python-pcs weka The following 9 packages had older versions which were reproducible, and their latest versions are now reproducible again due to changes in their build dependencies: csync2 dune-common dune-localfunctions libcommons-jxpath-java libcommons-logging-java libstax-java libyanfs-java python-daemon yacas The following packages have become newly reproducible after being fixed: The following packages had older versions which were reproducible, and their latest versions are now reproducible again after being fixed: Some uploads have fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Patches submitted that have not made their way to the archive yet: Package reviews 344 reviews have been added, 125 have been updated and 20 have been removed in this week. 14 FTBFS bugs have been reported by Chris Lamb. tests.reproducible-builds.org Misc. Dan Kegel sent a mail to report about his experiments with a reproducible dpkg PPA for Ubuntu. According to him sudo add-apt-repository ppa:dank/dpkg && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install dpkg should be enough to get reproducible builds on Ubuntu 16.04. This week's edition was written by Ximin Luo and Holger Levsen and reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible builds folks on IRC.

18 April 2016

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible builds: week 50 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the reproducible builds effort between April 3rd and April 9th 2016: Media coverage Emily Ratliff wrote an article for SecurityWeek called Establishing Correspondence Between an Application and its Source Code - How Combining Two Completely Separate Open Source Projects Can Make Us All More Secure. Tails have started work on a design for freezable APT repositories to make it easier and practical to perform reproductions of an entire distribution at a given point in time, which will be needed to create reproducible installation- or live-media. Toolchain fixes Alexis Bienven e submitted patches adding support for SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH in several tools: transfig, imagemagick, rdtool, and asciidoctor. boyska submitted one for python-reportlab. Packages fixed The following packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: atinject-jsr330 brailleutils cglib3 gnugo libcobra-java libgnumail-java libjchart2d-java libjcommon-java libjfreechart-java libjide-oss-java liblaf-widget-java liblastfm-java liboptions-java octave-control octave-mpi octave-nan octave-parallel octave-stk octave-struct octave-tsa oar The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Several uploads fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet: Other upstream fixes Alexander Batischev made a commit to make newsbeuter reproducible. tests.reproducible-builds.org Package reviews 93 reviews have been removed, 66 added and 21 updated in the previous week. 12 new FTBFS bugs have been reported by Chris Lamb and Niko Tyni. Misc. This week's edition was written by Lunar, Holger Levsen, Reiner Herrmann, Mattia Rizzolo and Ximin Luo. With the departure of Lunar as a full-time contributor, Reproducible Builds Weekly News (this thing you're reading) has moved from his personal Debian blog on Debian People to the Reproducible Builds team web site on Debian Alioth. You may want to update your RSS or Atom feeds. Very many thanks to Lunar for writing and publishing this weekly news for so long, well & continously!

16 August 2015

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 16 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the reproducible builds effort this week: Toolchain fixes Valentin Lorentz sent a patch for ispell to initialize memory structures before dumping their content. In our experimental repository, qt4-x11 has been rebased on the latest version (Dhole), as was doxygen (akira). Packages fixed The following packages became reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: backup-manager, cheese, coinor-csdp, coinor-dylp, ebook-speaker, freefem, indent, libjbcrypt-java, qtquick1-opensource-src, ruby-coffee-script, ruby-distribution, schroot, twittering-mode. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues but not all of them: Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet: akira found another embedded code copy of texi2html in maxima. reproducible.debian.net Work on testing several architectures has continued. (Mattia/h01ger) Package reviews 29 reviews have been removed, 187 added and 34 updated this week. 172 new FTBFS reports were filled, 137 solely by Chris West (Faux). josch spent time investigating the issue with fonts in PDF files. Chris Lamb documented the issue affecting documentation generated by ocamldoc. Misc. Lunar presented a general Reproducible builds HOWTO talk at the Chaos Communication Camp 2015 in Germany on August 13th. Recordings are already available, as well as slides and script. h01ger and Lunar also used CCCamp15 as an opportunity to have discussions with members of several different projects about reproducible builds. Good news should be coming soon.

10 August 2015

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 15 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the reproducible builds effort this week: Toolchain fixes Guillem Jover uploaded dpkg/1.18.2 which makes dependency comparisons deep by comparing not only the first dependency alternative, to get them sorted in a reproducible way. Original patch by Chris Lamb. Dhole updated the patch adding support for SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH in gettext. A modified package is in the experimental reproducible repository. Valentin Lorentz submitted a patch adding support for SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH to ocamldoc. Valentin Lorentz also opened a bug about the inability to set an arbitrary RNG seed for ocamlopt which would be a way to fix an issue affecting many OCaml packages. Dhole submitted a patch adding support for SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH in qhelpgenerator. A modified package has been sent to the experimental repository as well. Several packages have been updated for the experimental toolchain: doxygen (akira), and dpkg (h01ger). Also, h01ger has built and uploaded all experimental packages having arch:any packages for armhf: dpkg, gettext, doxygen, fontforge, libxslt and texlive-bin. We are now providing our toolchain for armhf and amd64. Packages fixed As you might have noticed, Debian sid is currently largely uninstallable, due to the GCC 5 transition, which also can be see in our reproducibility test setup. Please help! The following packages became reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: glosstex, indent, ktikz, liblouis, libmicrohttpd, linkchecker, multiboot, qterm, rrep, trueprint, twittering-mode. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet: Lunar reported an issue on an unstable ABI from a generated header in icedove reminding of an issue affecting libical-dev. The bug has since been fixed by Carsten Schoenert. akira identified an unreferenced embeded code copy (causing unreproducibility!) in gperf. reproducible.debian.net The scheduler has temporarily been changed to not schedule any already tested packages for sid and experimental, due to the the GCC 5 transitions, which are well visible in our graphs now. On the plus side this has caused our stretch testing to catch up (and improve stats). (h01ger) depwait packages (packages where the Build-Depends cannot be satisfied) are now listed in the last 24h and last 48h pages (Mattia Rizzolo) Two new amd64 build nodes (with 8 cores and 32 GB RAM each) have been added, kindly sponsored by Profitbricks. (h01ger) The 4 armhf (setup last week by Vagrant Cascadian) and 2 amd64 build nodes have been made available to Jenkins. Remote job scheduling has been implemented and 35 new jobs have been added for pbuilder and schroot creation and maintenance of the nodes. (h01ger) The manual scheduler gained a flag (-a/--architecture) to select which arch to schedule in. (Mattia Rizzolo) armhf will only be testing stretch for now, due to limited hardware ressources. (h01ger) The page listing maintainers of unreproducible packages gained internal anchors. As an example, one can now link to unreproducible orphaned packages. (Mattia Rizzolo) Packages with a bug tagged pending are marked using a new symbol: a brown P (Mattia Rizzolo) diffoscope development debbindiff is now called diffoscope! It also has a website at diffoscope.org. The name was changed to better reflect that it became a general purpose tool, capable of comparing many different archive formats, or directories. Version 29 is the renaming release. Amongst a couple of other cosmetic changes a favicon showing the new logo has been added to the generated HTML reports. Version 30 replaces the file matching algorithm for files listed in .changes to a smarter one that removes only the version number. It also fixes a bug where squashfs directories were being extracted even if their content was being compared at a later stage. It also fixes an issue with the test suite that was detected by debci. Documentation update More rationale have been added for supporting SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH The unfinished Reproducible Builds HOWTO is now visible on the web, feedback and patches most welcome. Package reviews 261 obsolete reviews have been removed, 73 added and 145 updated this week.

29 June 2015

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 9 in Stretch cycle

What happened about the reproducible builds effort this week: Toolchain fixes Norbert Preining uploaded texinfo/6.0.0.dfsg.1-2 which makes texinfo indices reproducible. Original patch by Chris Lamb. Lunar submitted recently rebased patches to make the file order of files inside .deb stable. akira filled #789843 to make tex4ht stop printing timestamps in its HTML output by default. Dhole wrote a patch for xutils-dev to prevent timestamps when creating gzip compresed files. Reiner Herrmann sent a follow-up patch for wheel to use UTC as timezone when outputing timestamps. Mattia Rizzolo started a discussion regarding the failure to build from source of subversion when -Wdate-time is added to CPPFLAGS which happens when asking dpkg-buildflags to use the reproducible profile. SWIG errors out because it doesn't recognize the aforementioned flag. Trying to get the .buildinfo specification to more definitive state, Lunar started a discussion on storing the checksums of the binary package used in dpkg status database. akira discovered while proposing a fix for simgrid that CMake internal command to create tarballs would record a timestamp in the gzip header. A way to prevent it is to use the GZIP environment variable to ask gzip not to store timestamps, but this will soon become unsupported. It's up for discussion if the best place to fix the problem would be to fix it for all CMake users at once. Infrastructure-related work Andreas Henriksson did a delayed NMU upload of pbuilder which adds minimal support for build profiles and includes several fixes from Mattia Rizzolo affecting reproducibility tests. Neils Thykier uploaded lintian which both raises the severity of package-contains-timestamped-gzip and avoids false positives for this tag (thanks to Tomasz Buchert). Petter Reinholdtsen filled #789761 suggesting that how-can-i-help should prompt its users about fixing reproducibility issues. Packages fixed The following packages became reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: autorun4linuxcd, libwildmagic, lifelines, plexus-i18n, texlive-base, texlive-extra, texlive-lang. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues but not all of them: Untested uploaded as they are not in main: Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet: debbindiff development debbindiff/23 includes a few bugfixes by Helmut Grohne that result in a significant speedup (especially on larger files). It used to exhibit the quadratic time string concatenation antipattern. Version 24 was released on June 23rd in a hurry to fix an undefined variable introduced in the previous version. (Reiner Herrmann) debbindiff now has a test suite! It is written using the PyTest framework (thanks Isis Lovecruft for the suggestion). The current focus has been on the comparators, and we are now at 93% of code coverage for these modules. Several problems were identified and fixed in the process: paths appearing in output of javap, readelf, objdump, zipinfo, unsqusahfs; useless MD5 checksum and last modified date in javap output; bad handling of charsets in PO files; the destination path for gzip compressed files not ending in .gz; only metadata of cpio archives were actually compared. stat output was further trimmed to make directory comparison more useful. Having the test suite enabled a refactoring of how comparators were written, switching from a forest of differences to a single tree. This helped removing dust from the oldest parts of the code. Together with some other small changes, version 25 was released on June 27th. A follow up release was made the next day to fix a hole in the test suite and the resulting unidentified leftover from the comparator refactoring. (Lunar) Documentation update Ximin Luo improved code examples for some proposed environment variables for reference timestamps. Dhole added an example on how to fix timestamps C pre-processor macros by adding a way to set the build date externally. akira documented her fix for tex4ht timestamps. Package reviews 94 obsolete reviews have been removed, 330 added and 153 updated this week. Hats off for Chris West (Faux) who investigated many fail to build from source issues and reported the relevant bugs. Slight improvements were made to the scripts for editing the review database, edit-notes and clean-notes. (Mattia Rizzolo) Meetings A meeting was held on June 23rd. Minutes are available. The next meeting will happen on Tuesday 2015-07-07 at 17:00 UTC. Misc. The Linux Foundation announced that it was funding the work of Lunar and h01ger on reproducible builds in Debian and other distributions. This was further relayed in a Bits from Debian blog post.

17 May 2015

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 3 in Stretch cycle

What happened about the reproducible builds effort for this week: Toolchain fixes Tomasz Buchert submitted a patch to fix the currently overzealous package-contains-timestamped-gzip warning. Daniel Kahn Gillmor identified #588746 as a source of unreproducibility for packages using python-support. Packages fixed The following 57 packages became reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: antlr-maven-plugin, aspectj-maven-plugin, build-helper-maven-plugin, clirr-maven-plugin, clojure-maven-plugin, cobertura-maven-plugin, coinor-ipopt, disruptor, doxia-maven-plugin, exec-maven-plugin, gcc-arm-none-eabi, greekocr4gamera, haskell-swish, jarjar-maven-plugin, javacc-maven-plugin, jetty8, latexml, libcgi-application-perl, libnet-ssleay-perl, libtest-yaml-valid-perl, libwiki-toolkit-perl, libwww-csrf-perl, mate-menu, maven-antrun-extended-plugin, maven-antrun-plugin, maven-archiver, maven-bundle-plugin, maven-clean-plugin, maven-compiler-plugin, maven-ear-plugin, maven-install-plugin, maven-invoker-plugin, maven-jar-plugin, maven-javadoc-plugin, maven-processor-plugin, maven-project-info-reports-plugin, maven-replacer-plugin, maven-resources-plugin, maven-shade-plugin, maven-site-plugin, maven-source-plugin, maven-stapler-plugin, modello-maven-plugin1.4, modello-maven-plugin, munge-maven-plugin, ocaml-bitstring, ocr4gamera, plexus-maven-plugin, properties-maven-plugin, ruby-magic, ruby-mocha, sisu-maven-plugin, syncache, vdk2, wvstreams, xml-maven-plugin, xmlbeans-maven-plugin. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues but not all of them: Ben Hutchings also improved and merged several changes submitted by Lunar to linux. Currently untested because in contrib: reproducible.debian.net
Thanks to the reproducible-build team for running a buildd from hell. gregor herrmann
Mattia Rizzolo modified the script added last week to reschedule a package from Alioth, a reason can now be optionally specified. Holger Levsen splitted the package sets page so each set now has its own page. He also added new sets for Java packages, Haskell packages, Ruby packages, debian-installer packages, Go packages, and OCaml packages. Reiner Herrmann added locales-all to the set of packages installed in the build environment as its needed to properly identify variations due to the current locale. Holger Levsen improved the scheduling so new uploads get tested sooner. He also changed the .json output that is used by tracker.debian.org to lists FTBFS issues again but only for issues unrelated to the toolchain or our test setup. Amongst many other small fixes and additions, the graph colors should now be more friendly to red-colorblind people. The fix for pbuilder given in #677666 by Tim Landscheidt is now used. This fixed several FTBFS for OCaml packages. Work on rebuilding with different CPU has continued, a kvm-on-kvm build host has been set been set up for this purpose. debbindiff development Version 19 of debbindiff included a fix for a regression when handling info files. Version 20 fixes a bug when diffing files with many differences toward a last line with no newlines. It also now uses the proper encoding when writing the text output to a pipe, and detects info files better. Documentation update Thanks to Santiago Vila, the unneeded -depth option used with find when fixing mtimes has been removed from the examples. Package reviews 113 obsolete reviews have been removed this week while 77 has been added.

3 February 2015

Thorsten Alteholz: USB 3.0 hub and Gigabit LAN adapter

Recently I bought an USB 3.0 Hub with three USB 3.0 ports and one Gigabit LAN port. It is manufactured by Delock and I purchased it from Reichelt (Delock 62440). Under Wheezy the USB part is recognized without problems but the kernel (3.2.0-4) does not have a driver for the ethernet part.
The USB Id is idVendor=0b95 and idProduct=1790, the manufacturer is ASIX Elec. Corp. and the product is: AX88179. So Google led me to a product page at Asix, where I could download the driver for kernel 2.6.x and 3.x.

mkdir -p /usr/local/src/asix/ax88179
cd /usr/local/src/asix/ax88179
wget www.asix.com.tw/FrootAttach/driver/AX88179_178A_LINUX_DRIVER_v1.13.0_SOURCE.tar.bz2
tar -jxf AX88179_178A_LINUX_DRIVER_v1.13.0_SOURCE.tar.bz2
cd AX88179_178A_LINUX_DRIVER_v1.13.0_SOURCE
apt-get install module-assistant
module-assistant prepare
make
make install
modprobe ax88179_178a.ko
After editing /etc/network/interfaces and doing an ifup eth1, voila, I have a new network link. I hope the hardware is as good as the installation has been easy.

31 December 2010

Debian News: New Debian Developers (December 2010)

The following developers got their Debian accounts in the last month: Congratulations!

The following developers have returned as Debian Developers after having retired at some time in the past:

Welcome back!

10 September 2010

Bernd Zeimetz: refactoring the guruplug server plus

As mentioned in my last blog post the GuruPlug Server Plus needs some major refactoring before it can be used. Not doing so will make you end up with a fried brick. There are various stories in the forums about cooling it properly, so you might want to have a look first instead of following mine blindly. And of course - whatever you do - it is your fault when you end up with a brick, not mine!.

Replacing the power supply As I would never ever trust the PSU (see my last blog post for the gory details) and some additional free space in the case is necessary, it is time to rip it out. As replacement I've ordered an external 5V/20W PSU. To connect it to the plug I've drilled a hole into the case and added a proper connector after soldering the original cable from the old PSU to it. Make sure to add some retainer to stop the cable from touching the CPU/memory heat sinks later. GuruPlug Server Plus PSU replacement GuruPlug Server Plus PSU cabling

Proper heatsinks One of the biggest problems in the original GuruPlug design is the heat spreading and collecting piece of alloy, which probably makes things even worse than better. After some discussion in #debian-devel the idea came up, that the board should be able to run fine without a heatsink - at least when idling. That is the case, indeed. So let's get rid of that piece of alloy, together with the holders and springs. Unfortunately heat things are necessary to handle some work load. To mount them make sure you get some good thermal glue as you don't want to insulate the chips from their heat sinks. I've used Arctic Silver II thermal glue - not cheap, but working well. Make sure to clean the heat sinks and chips properly with alcohol (2-Propanol is my favourite for that), so there is no fat and dust left. When you use the glue be careful to read the documentation properly and make sure you apply only as much as necessary - a thin coating is enough. After applying the glue and mounting the heat sink you need a clamp to put some pressure on it while the glue dries.

Heat sinks for the memory As there is a lot of space around the memory chips, I've got some 14x14x6mm heat sinks. Luckily there are only small parts on the other side of the board, so it was not hard to attach clamps to ensure the glue is able to dry properly. In case largish amounts of glue are squeezing out between heat sink and chip you probably want to start from scratch and clean everything (quickly!) with alcohol again. GuruPlug Server Plus memory heat sink clamping

Gigabit Ethernet PHY and CPU heatsinks PHY and CPU need proper heatsinks as they're becoming pretty hot under load. Due to space limitations I had to stick with a 17x17x20mm heat sink for the PHY. I've tried to get a largish heat sink with BGA mount for the CPU, but I was not able to find one in short time and without ordering 1000 of them. So I've got another one of the 17x17x20mm model for the CPU. Later I found two other heat sinks which might fit on the GuruPlug's CPU: Malico 19x19x25mm or a Advanced Thermal Solutions Maxigrip. But for now the smaller one will have to do the job, also I'm scared to removed it without destroying the CPU. To mount the heat sink on the PHY a bit of preparation is necessary to ensure that the glue doesn't result in short cuts on the IC's pins. The arctic silver documentation recommends to use silicone on the pins to stop the glue. As I neither had the proper silicone nor did I want to make such a mess, I've decided to get a sticky insulating tape and some tooth picks to mount it properly on the IC pins. Make sure to do a proper job here! With good clamps you can work on the PHY while the memory heat sink glue is still drying. GuruPlug Server Plus - preparing the PHY The other problem on this side of the board is that some higher parts are mounted on the lower side of the board, so make sure to get some foam to protect them from your clamps. Except of the size of the heat sinks there is no real difference to the small ones: add glue, mount the heat sink and fix it with a clamp. GuruPlug Server Plus - mounting the PHY heatsink Before the glue dries completely make sure you remove the duct tape strips again. Be careful not to wipe any excess glue onto the IC pins. If you manage to do so you might want to remove and clean everything properly. So just be careful and everything should be fine. GuruPlug Server Plus - mounting the PHY heatsink 3 Mounting the heat sink on the CPU is easier as the CPU is a nice BGA package. No need to protect pins an there are none. GuruPlug Server Plus - mounting the CPU heatsink

Finished As you're able to see on the photo I did not the very perfect job, but fine enough to work properly. GuruPlug Server Plus - heatsinks

First tests with the new heatsinks Some tests with stress and some heavy network traffic showed quickly that the heat sinks are working well! But not well enough to be able to mount them into the original closed case (how the hell was this supposed to work before!?). Without any air to breath the temperature on the CPU heat sink went up to 85 deg C quickly. So on the CPU's die are > 100 deg C, which is at least close to the max allowed temperature. GuruPlug Server Plus - still too hot

Adding air holes Obviously some additional air holes are necessary. After meeting my drill and cutter, the original case looks a bit like a piece of cheese now. GuruPlug Server Plus - case with air holes 1 GuruPlug Server Plus - case with air holes 2 Some more tests show that the temperature sticks around 76 deg C under heavy load now. That is still pretty hot, especially when the temperature in the room becomes hotter in summer. As I'm not going to run a lot of traffic trough it (my cable connection is limited to 20 MBit/s anyway), I guess it will work. Below is a graph I've recorded with my multimeter and qtdmm. It shows that the temperature rises to ~76 deg C and stays there. GuruPlug Server Plus - temperature curve Not sure if I could introuce some more load, the CPU had a load of 6 running stress. Network traffic was around 2x100MBit/s again. I could imagine with 2xGBit the CPU and PHY would become much hotter (no idea if it would be able to handle it at all, though). The PHY was usually a bit cooler than the CPU, so I didn't spend time to measure the temperature properly.

Conclusion My opinion is still the the original design of the plug is an insane QA and design failure. There is no way that it could ever work as shipped originally. If I'd have to design a new case for it, it should have a single insulated compartment for a PSU to ensure that no contact with high voltage is possible. The case around all other parts should be made of alloy with a lot of air holes. So the case could be used as heat sink (properly done, not with these insulating duct tape strips) and at the same time allow air circulation and a nice view on the LEDs on the board. Of course the case would be much more expensive than, but I'm sure it would work properly and would be worth the money. And if done peoperly, it would look much better than this blinking plastic thing. I could imagine it would sell well! So at the end I'm wondering what GlobalScale Technologies will do. I doubt it will be possible to create the 'professional upgrade kit' as they had announced before. Replacing all units is the only proper way. We'll see what happens. At least my GuruPlug is working well now and it will be used as replacement for my OpenWRT router soon. WiFi is not working, but that will be handled by my media center anyway. GuruPlug Server Plus - running plug

7 March 2010

Emilio Pozuelo Monfort: RCBW #1 Me too!

After fixing some bugs this week, I ve noticed they ve been one per day (on average) so I think I m joining Stefano Zacchiroli on this RCBW thingie let s see if I can keep up! These are this week s bugs: #561645 gdesklets Doesn t work with python2.6 (thanks to Andrew Starr-Bochicchio)
#571488 gedit FTBFS with Python 2.6 as default
#571517 totem FTBFS with Python 2.6 as default
#571510 rhythmbox FTBFS with Python 2.6 as default
#533836 spe FTBFS with Python 2.6 as default
#569378 gnet FTBFS
#551215 gtkmm-documentation FTBFS I ve also sponsored gnome-dvb-daemon for Sebastian Reichel, which fixes two more RC bugs: #566949 gnome-dvb-daemon FTBFS with Python 2.6 as default
#569480 gnome-dvb-daemon FTBFS It s interesting to note that all of the above bugs except for the spe one are from pkg-gnome packages. We still have a few more, although they are the hard ones so it s not gonna be that easy for the next week

5 June 2009

Joachim Breitner: Third place in AI programming contest

My contribution to the programming contest held by the German FreiesMagazin got a third place out of 13 submissions. This is quite good, considering that I only wrote a small wrapper around the generic game-tree Haskell library by Colin Adams, and hardly gave any serious thought into the problem.All entires are available for download. I have annotated the table containing the results with the line count as given by ohcount:
W D L Points Language Code lines
1. Kroschinsky 904 242 54 2954 Python 589
2. Schulz 858 263 79 2837 Python 544
3. Breitner 837 281 82 2792 Haskell 264
4. Jackermeier 754 306 140 2568 Perl 183
5. Roth 574 338 288 2060 C++ 1731
6. Eitel 567 355 278 2056 Ruby 352
7. Reichel 342 328 530 1354 Python 266
8. Zimmermann 303 400 497 1309 Java 1070
9. Apensiv 190 353 657 923 Perl 410
10. Maraun 150 300 750 750 C++ 690
11. Golemo 131 319 750 712 Python 104
12. Ziegelwanger 120 337 743 697 C++ 868
13. Fuest 32 254 914 350 Python 645
Note that the line count for my haskell program includes the game-tree library, which I bundled in my submission. Without it, it s 156 lines of code I had to write, which is second best in the code golf category.If you look at the timing statistics, you will see that my program took the longest. When the contest was started, the timelimit was one minute per round which I of course tried to use as much as possibly, by increasing the search tree depth. Later into the contest, the rules were changed to limit it to one minute for a whole game, and that long-running programs will get points deducted. I did some minor changes based on a profiling run, but did otherwise not care too much about performance. I would have tried to improve the runtime by using Haskell s good ability for parallelization. But when I asked on what kind of machine the code will be run, but they would not tell me. They said that this is a hobby programmer s contest where allowing for parallelization were not fair, so I did not work in that direction.All in all it was a positive experience, showing of Haskell s qualities as a language that you can quickly get good results with.