Search Results: "paul"

1 August 2020

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities July 2020

Focus This month I didn't have any particular focus. I just worked on issues in my info bubble.

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • Debian wiki: unblock IP addresses, approve accounts, reset email addresses

Communication

Sponsors The purple-discord, ifenslave and psqlodbc work was sponsored by my employer. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

27 July 2020

Russ Allbery: Summer haul

I'm buying rather too many books at the moment and not reading enough of them (in part because I got back into Minecraft and in part because I got a bit stuck on a few difficult books). I think I've managed to get myself unstuck again, though, and have started catching up on reviews. 2020. It's kind of a lot. And I'm not even that heavily affected. Katherine Addison The Angel of the Crows (sff)
Marie Brennan A Natural History of Dragons (sff)
Kacen Callender Queen of the Conquered (sff)
Jo Clayton Diadem from the Stars (sff)
Jo Clayton Lamarchos (sff)
Jo Clayton Irsud (sff)
Clifford D. Conner The Tragedy of American Science (nonfiction)
Kate Elliott Unconquerable Sun (sff)
Rory Fanning & Craig Hodges Long Shot (nonfiction)
Michael Harrington Socialism: Past & Future (nonfiction)
Nalo Hopkinson Brown Girl in the Ring (sff)
Kameron Hurley The Stars Are Legion (sff)
N.K. Jemisin Emergency Skin (sff)
T. Kingfisher A Wizard's Guide to Defensive Baking (sff)
T. Kingfisher Nine Goblins (sff)
Michael Lewis The Fifth Risk (nonfiction)
Paul McAuley War of the Maps (sff)
Gretchen McCulloch Because Internet (nonfiction)
Hayao Miyazaki Nausica of the Valley of the Wind (graphic novel)
Annalee Newitz The Future of Another Timeline (sff)
Nick Pettigrew Anti-Social (nonfiction)
Rivers Solomon, et al. The Deep (sff)
Jo Walton Or What You Will (sff)
Erik Olin Wright Stardust to Stardust (nonfiction) Of these, I've already read and reviewed The Fifth Risk (an excellent book).

Russ Allbery: Review: Rise of the Warrior Cop

Review: Rise of the Warrior Cop, by Radley Balko
Publisher: PublicAffairs
Copyright: 2013
ISBN: 1-61039-212-4
Format: Kindle
Pages: 336
As the United States tries, in fits and starts, to have a meaningful discussion about long-standing police racism, brutality, overreach, corruption, and murder, I've realized that my theoretical understanding of the history of and alternative frameworks for law enforcement is woefully lacking. Starting with a book by a conservative white guy is not the most ideal of approaches, but it's what I already had on hand, and it won't be the last book I read and review on this topic. (Most of my research so far has been in podcast form. I don't review those here, but I can recommend Ezra Klein's interviews with Ta-Nehisi Coates, Paul Butler, and, most strongly, sujatha baliga.) Rise of the Warrior Cop is from 2013 and has had several moments of fame, no doubt helped by Balko's connections to the conservative and libertarian right. One of the frustrating facts of US politics is that critiques of the justice system from the right (and from white men) get more media attention than critiques from the left. That said, it's a generally well-respected book on the factual history of the topic, and police brutality and civil rights are among the points on which I have stopped-clock agreements with US libertarians. This book is very, very libertarian. In my callow youth, I was an ardent libertarian, so I've read a lot of US libertarian literature. It's a genre with its own conventions that become obvious when you read enough of it, and Rise of the Warrior Cop goes through them like a checklist. Use the Roman Republic (never the Roman Empire) as the starting point for any political discussion, check. Analyze the topic in the context of pre-revolutionary America, check. Spend considerable effort on discerning the opinions of the US founders on the topic since their opinions are always relevant to the modern world, check. Locate some point in the past (preferably before 1960) where the political issue was as good as it has ever been, check. Frame all changes since then as an erosion of rights through government overreach, check. Present your solution as a return to a previous era of respect for civil rights, check. Once you start recognizing the genre conventions, their prevalence in libertarian writing is almost comical. The framing chapters therefore leave a bit to be desired, but the meat of the book is a useful resource. Starting with the 1970s and its use as a campaigning tool by Nixon, Balko traces a useful history of the war on drugs. And starting with the 1980s, the number of cites to primary sources and the evidence of Balko's own research increases considerably. If you want to know how US police turned into military cosplayers with body armor, heavy weapons, and armored vehicles, this book provides a lot of context and history. One of the reasons why I view libertarians as allies of convenience on this specific issue is that drug legalization and disgust with the war on drugs have been libertarian issues for decades. Ideologically honest libertarians (and Balko appears to be one) are inherently skeptical of the police, so when the police overreach in an area of libertarian interest, they notice. Balko makes a solid argument, backed up with statistics, specific programs, legislation, and court cases, that the drug war and its accompanying lies about heavily-armed drug dealers and their supposed threat to police officers was the fuel for the growth of SWAT teams, no-knock search warrants, erosion of legal protections for criminal defendants, and de facto license for the police to ignore the scope and sometimes even the existence of warrants. This book is useful support for the argument that fears for the safety of officers underlying the militarization of police forces are imaginary. One telling point that Balko makes repeatedly and backs with statistical and anecdotal evidence is that the police generally do not use raid tactics on dangerous criminals. On the contrary, aggressive raids are more likely to be used on the least dangerous criminals because they're faster, they're fun for the police (they provide an adrenaline high and let them play with toys), and they're essentially risk-free. If the police believe someone is truly dangerous, they're more likely to use careful surveillance and to conduct a quiet arrest at an unexpected moment. The middle-of-the-night armed break-ins with battering rams, tear gas, and flash-bangs are, tellingly, used against the less dangerous suspects. This is part of Balko's overall argument that police equipment and tactics have become untethered from any realistic threat and have become cultural. He traces an acceleration of that trend to 9/11 and the resulting obsession with terrorism, which further opened the spigot of military hardware and "special forces" training. This became a point of competition between police departments, with small town forces that had never seen a terrorist and had almost no chance of a terrorist incident demanding their own armored vehicles. I've encountered this bizarre terrorism justification personally; one of the reasons my local police department gave in a public hearing for not having a policy against shooting at moving vehicles was "but what if terrorism?" I don't believe there has ever been a local terrorist attack. SWAT in such places didn't involve the special training or dedicated personnel of large city forces; instead, it was a part-time duty for normal police officers, and frequently they were encouraged to practice SWAT tactics by using them at random for some otherwise normal arrest or search. Balko argues that those raids were more exciting than normal police work, leading to a flood of volunteers for that duty and a tendency to use them as much as possible. That in turn normalizes disconnecting police tactics from the underlying crime or situational risk. So far, so good. But despite the information I was able to extract from it, I have mixed feelings about Rise of the Warrior Cop as a whole. At the least, it has substantial limitations. First, I don't trust the historical survey of policing in this book. Libertarian writing makes for bad history. The constraints of the genre require overusing only a few points of reference, treating every opinion of the US founders as holy writ, and tying forward progress to a return to a previous era, all of which interfere with good analysis. Balko also didn't do the research for the historical survey, as is clear from the footnotes. The citations are all to other people's histories, not to primary sources. He's summarizing other people's histories, and you'll almost certainly get better history by finding well-respected historians who cover the same ground. (That said, if you're not familiar with Peel's policing principles, this is a good introduction.) Second, and this too is unfortunately predictable in a libertarian treatment, race rarely appears in this book. If Balko published the same book today, I'm sure he would say more about race, but even in 2013 its absence is strange. I was struck while reading by how many examples of excessive police force were raids on west coast pot farms; yes, I'm sure that was traumatic, but it's not the demographic I would name as the most vulnerable to or affected by police brutality. West coast pot growers are, however, mostly white. I have no idea why Balko made that choice. Perhaps he thought his target audience would be more persuaded by his argument if he focused on white victims. Perhaps he thought it was an easier and less complicated story to tell. Perhaps, like a lot of libertarians, he doesn't believe racism has a significant impact on society because it would be a market failure. Perhaps those were the people who more readily came to mind. But to talk about police militarization, denial of civil rights, and police brutality in the United States without putting race at the center of both the history and the societal effects leaves a gaping hole in the analysis. Given that lack of engagement, I also am dubious of Balko's policy prescriptions. His reform suggestions aren't unreasonable, but they stay firmly in the centrist and incrementalist camp and would benefit white people more than black people. Transparency, accountability, and cultural changes are all fine and good, but the cultural change Balko is focused on is less aggressive arrest tactics, more use of mediation, and better physical fitness. I would not object to those things (well, maybe the last, which seemed odd), but we need to have a discussion about police white supremacist organizations, the prevalence of spousal abuse, and the police tendency to see themselves not as public servants but as embattled warriors who are misunderstood by the naive sheep they are defending. And, of course, you won't find in Rise of the Warrior Cop any thoughtful wrestling with whether there are alternative approaches to community safety, whether punitive rather than restorative justice is effective, or whether crime is a symptom of deeper societal problems we could address but refuse to. The most radical suggestion Balko has is to legalize drugs, which is both the predictable libertarian position and, as we have seen from recent events in the United States, far from the only problem of overcriminalization. I understand why this book is so frequently mentioned on-line, and its author's political views may make it more palatable to some people than a more race-centered or radical perspective. But I don't think this is the best or most useful book on police violence that one could read today. I hope to find a better one in upcoming reviews. Rating: 6 out of 10

4 July 2020

Russ Allbery: Review: The Light Brigade

Review: The Light Brigade, by Kameron Hurley
Publisher: Saga
Copyright: 2019
ISBN: 1-4814-4798-X
Format: Kindle
Pages: 355
In the wake of the Blink, which left a giant crater where S o Paulo was, Dietz signed up for the military. To be a hero. To satisfy an oath of vengeance. To kill aliens. Corporations have consumed the governments that used to run Earth and have divided the world between them. Dietz's family, before the Blink, were ghouls in Tene-Silva territory, non-citizens who scavenged a precarious life on the margins. Citizenship is a reward for loyalty and a mechanism of control. The only people who don't fit into the corporate framework are the Martians, former colonists who went dark for ten years and re-emerged as a splinter group offering to use their superior technology to repair environmental damage to the northern hemisphere caused by corporate wars. When the Blink happens, apparently done with technology far beyond what the corporations have, corporate war with the Martians is the unsurprising result. Long-time SF readers will immediately recognize The Light Brigade as a response to Starship Troopers with far more cynical world-building. For the first few chapters, the parallelism is very strong, down to the destruction of a large South American city (S o Paulo instead of Buenos Aires), a naive military volunteer, and horrific basic training. But, rather than dropships, the soldiers in Dietz's world are sent into battle via, essentially, Star Trek transporters. These still very experimental transporters send Dietz to a different mission than the one in the briefing. Advance warning that I'm going to talk about what's happening with Dietz's drops below. It's a spoiler, but you would find out not far into the book and I don't think it ruins anything important. (On the contrary, it may give you an incentive to stick through the slow and unappealing first few chapters.) I had so many suspension of disbelief problems with this book. So many. This starts with the technology. The core piece of world-building is Star Trek transporters, so fine, we're not talking about hard physics. Every SF story gets one or two free bits of impossible technology, and Hurley does a good job showing the transporters through a jaundiced military eye. But, late in the book, this technology devolves into one of my least-favorite bits of SF hand-waving that, for me, destroyed that gritty edge. Technology problems go beyond the transporters. One of the bits of horror in basic training is, essentially, torture simulators, whose goal is apparently to teach soldiers to dissociate (not that the book calls it that). One problem is that I never understood why a military would want to teach dissociation to so many people, but a deeper problem is that the mechanics of this simulation made no sense. Dietz's training in this simulator is a significant ongoing plot point, and it kept feeling like it was cribbed from The Matrix rather than something translatable into how computers work. Technology was the more minor suspension of disbelief problem, though. The larger problem was the political and social world-building. Hurley constructs a grim, totalitarian future, which is a fine world-building choice although I think it robs some nuance from the story she is telling about how militaries lie to soldiers. But the totalitarian model she uses is one of near-total information control. People believe what the corporations tell them to believe, or at least are indifferent to it. Huge world events (with major plot significance) are distorted or outright lies, and those lies are apparently believed by everyone. The skepticism that exists is limited to grumbling about leadership competence and cynicism about motives, not disagreement with the provided history. This is critical to the story; it's a driver behind Dietz's character growth and is required to set up the story's conclusion. This is a model of totalitarianism that's familiar from Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. The problem: The Internet broke this model. You now need North Korean levels of isolation to pull off total message control, which is incompatible with the social structure or technology level that Hurley shows. You may be objecting that the modern world is full of people who believe outrageous propaganda against all evidence. But the world-building problem is not that some people believe the corporate propaganda. It's that everyone does. Modern totalitarians have stopped trying to achieve uniformity (because it stopped working) and instead make the disagreement part of the appeal. You no longer get half a country to believe a lie by ensuring they never hear the truth. Instead, you equate belief in the lie with loyalty to a social or political group, and belief in the truth with affiliation with some enemy. This goes hand in hand with "flooding the zone" with disinformation and fakes and wild stories until people's belief in the accessibility of objective truth is worn down and all facts become ideological statements. This does work, all too well, but it relies on more information, not less. (See Zeynep Tufekci's excellent Twitter and Tear Gas if you're unfamiliar with this analysis.) In that world, Dietz would have heard the official history, the true history, and all sorts of wild alternative histories, making correct belief a matter of political loyalty. There is no sign of that. Hurley does gesture towards some technology to try to explain this surprising corporate effectiveness. All the soldiers have implants, and military censors can supposedly listen in at any time. But, in the story, this censorship is primarily aimed at grumbling and local disloyalty. There is no sign that it's being used to keep knowledge of significant facts from spreading, nor is there any sign of the same control among the general population. It's stated in the story that the censors can't even keep up with soldiers; one would have to get unlucky to be caught. And yet the corporation maintains preternatural information control. The place this bugged me the most is around knowledge of the current date. For reasons that will be obvious in a moment, Dietz has reasons to badly want to know what month and year it is and is unable to find this information anywhere. This appears to be intentional; Tene-Silva has a good (albeit not that urgent) reason to keep soldiers from knowing the date. But I don't think Hurley realizes just how hard that is. Take a look around the computer you're using to read this and think about how many places the date shows up. Apart from the ubiquitous clock and calendar app, there are dates on every file, dates on every news story, dates on search results, dates in instant messages, dates on email messages and voice mail... they're everywhere. And it's not just the computer. The soldiers can easily smuggle prohibited outside goods into the base; knowledge of the date would be much easier. And even if Dietz doesn't want to ask anyone, there are opportunities to go off base during missions. Somehow every newspaper and every news bulletin has its dates suppressed? It's not credible, and it threw me straight out of the story. These world-building problems are unfortunate, since at the heart of The Light Brigade is a (spoiler alert) well-constructed time travel story that I would have otherwise enjoyed. Dietz is being tossed around in time with each jump. And, unlike some of these stories, Hurley does not take the escape hatch of alternate worlds or possible futures. There is a single coherent timeline that Dietz and the reader experience in one order and the rest of the world experiences in a different order. The construction of this timeline is incredibly well-done. Time can only disconnect at jump and return points, and Hurley maintains tight control over the number of unresolved connections. At every point in the story, I could list all of the unresolved discontinuities and enjoy their complexity and implications without feeling overwhelmed by them. Dietz gains some foreknowledge, but in a way that's wildly erratic and hard to piece together fast enough for a single soldier to do anything about the plot. The world spins out of control with foreshadowing of grimmer and grimmer events, and then Hurley pulls it back together in a thoroughly satisfying interweaving of long-anticipated scenes and major surprises. I'm not usually a fan of time travel stories, but this is one of the best I've read. It also has a satisfying emotional conclusion (albeit marred for me by some unbelievable mystical technobabble), which is impressive given how awful and nasty Hurley makes this world. Dietz is a great first-person narrator, believably naive and cynical by turns, and piecing together the story structure alongside the protagonist built my emotional attachment to Dietz's character arc. Hurley writes the emotional dynamics of soldiers thoughtfully and well: shit-talking, fights, sudden moments of connection, shared cynicism over degenerating conditions, and the underlying growth of squad loyalty that takes over other motivations and becomes the reason to keep on fighting. Hurley also pulled off a neat homage to (and improvement on) Starship Troopers that caught me entirely by surprise and that I've hopefully not spoiled. This is a solid science fiction novel if you can handle the world-building. I couldn't, but I understand why it was nominated for the Hugo and Clarke awards. Recommended if you're less picky about technological and social believability than I am, although content warning for a lot of bloody violence and death (including against children) and a horrifically depressing world. Rating: 6 out of 10

1 July 2020

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities June 2020

Focus This month I didn't have any particular focus. I just worked on issues in my info bubble.

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • Debian BTS: usertags QA
  • Debian IRC channels: fixed a channel mode lock
  • Debian wiki: unblock IP addresses, approve accounts, ping folks with bouncing email

Communication
  • Respond to queries from Debian users and developers on the mailing lists and IRC

Sponsors The ifenslave and apt-listchanges work was sponsored by my employer. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

4 June 2020

Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in May 2020

Welcome to the May 2020 report from the Reproducible Builds project. One of the original promises of open source software is that distributed peer review and transparency of process results in enhanced end-user security. Nonetheless, whilst anyone may inspect the source code of free and open source software for malicious flaws, almost all software today is distributed as pre-compiled binaries. This allows nefarious third-parties to compromise systems by injecting malicious code into seemingly secure software during the various compilation and distribution processes. In these reports we outline the most important things that we and the rest of the community have been up to over the past month.

News The Corona-Warn app that helps trace infection chains of SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 in Germany had a feature request filed against it that it build reproducibly. A number of academics from Cornell University have published a paper titled Backstabber s Knife Collection which reviews various open source software supply chain attacks:
Recent years saw a number of supply chain attacks that leverage the increasing use of open source during software development, which is facilitated by dependency managers that automatically resolve, download and install hundreds of open source packages throughout the software life cycle.
In related news, the LineageOS Android distribution announced that a hacker had access to the infrastructure of their servers after exploiting an unpatched vulnerability. Marcin Jachymiak of the Sia decentralised cloud storage platform posted on their blog that their siac and siad utilities can now be built reproducibly:
This means that anyone can recreate the same binaries produced from our official release process. Now anyone can verify that the release binaries were created using the source code we say they were created from. No single person or computer needs to be trusted when producing the binaries now, which greatly reduces the attack surface for Sia users.
Synchronicity is a distributed build system for Rust build artifacts which have been published to crates.io. The goal of Synchronicity is to provide a distributed binary transparency system which is independent of any central operator. The Comparison of Linux distributions article on Wikipedia now features a Reproducible Builds column indicating whether distributions approach and progress towards achieving reproducible builds.

Distribution work In Debian this month: In Alpine Linux, an issue was filed and closed regarding the reproducibility of .apk packages. Allan McRae of the ArchLinux project posted their third Reproducible builds progress report to the arch-dev-public mailing list which includes the following call for help:
We also need help to investigate and fix the packages that fail to reproduce that we have not investigated as of yet.
In openSUSE, Bernhard M. Wiedemann published his monthly Reproducible Builds status update.

Software development

diffoscope Chris Lamb made the changes listed below to diffoscope, our in-depth and content-aware diff utility that can locate and diagnose reproducibility issues. He also prepared and uploaded versions 142, 143, 144, 145 and 146 to Debian, PyPI, etc.
  • Comparison improvements:
    • Improve fuzzy matching of JSON files as file now supports recognising JSON data. (#106)
    • Refactor .changes and .buildinfo handling to show all details (including the GnuPG header and footer components) even when referenced files are not present. (#122)
    • Use our BuildinfoFile comparator (etc.) regardless of whether the associated files (such as the orig.tar.gz and the .deb) are present. [ ]
    • Include GnuPG signature data when comparing .buildinfo, .changes, etc. [ ]
    • Add support for printing Android APK signatures via apksigner(1). (#121)
    • Identify iOS App Zip archive data as .zip files. (#116)
    • Add support for Apple Xcode .mobilepovision files. (#113)
  • Bug fixes:
    • Don t print a traceback if we pass a single, missing argument to diffoscope (eg. a JSON diff to re-load). [ ]
    • Correct differences typo in the ApkFile handler. (#127)
  • Output improvements:
    • Never emit the same id="foo" anchor reference twice in the HTML output, otherwise identically-named parts will not be able to linked to via a #foo anchor. (#120)
    • Never emit an empty id anchor either; it is not possible to link to #. [ ]
    • Don t pretty-print the output when using the --json presenter; it will usually be too complicated to be readable by the human anyway. [ ]
    • Use the SHA256 over MD5 hash when generating page names for the HTML directory-style presenter. (#124)
  • Reporting improvements:
    • Clarify the message when we truncate the number of lines to standard error [ ] and reduce the number of maximum lines printed to 25 as usually the error is obvious by then [ ].
    • Print the amount of free space that we have available in our temporary directory as a debugging message. [ ]
    • Clarify Command [ ] failed with exit code messages to remove duplicate exited with exit but also to note that diffoscope is interpreting this as an error. [ ]
    • Don t leak the full path of the temporary directory in Command [ ] exited with 1 messages. (#126)
    • Clarify the warning message when we cannot import the debian Python module. [ ]
    • Don t repeat stderr from if both commands emit the same output. [ ]
    • Clarify that an external command emits for both files, otherwise it can look like we are repeating itself when, in reality, it is being run twice. [ ]
  • Testsuite improvements:
    • Prevent apksigner test failures due to lack of binfmt_misc, eg. on Salsa CI and elsewhere. [ ]
    • Drop .travis.yml as we use Salsa instead. [ ]
  • Dockerfile improvements:
    • Add a .dockerignore file to whitelist files we actually need in our container. (#105)
    • Use ARG instead of ENV when setting up the DEBIAN_FRONTEND environment variable at runtime. (#103)
    • Run as a non-root user in container. (#102)
    • Install/remove the build-essential during build so we can install the recommended packages from Git. [ ]
  • Codebase improvements:
    • Bump the officially required version of Python from 3.5 to 3.6. (#117)
    • Drop the (default) shell=False keyword argument to subprocess.Popen so that the potentially-unsafe shell=True is more obvious. [ ]
    • Perform string normalisation in Black [ ] and include the Black output in the assertion failure too [ ].
    • Inline MissingFile s special handling of deb822 to prevent leaking through abstract layers. [ ][ ]
    • Allow a bare try/except block when cleaning up temporary files with respect to the flake8 quality assurance tool. [ ]
    • Rename in_dsc_path to dsc_in_same_dir to clarify the use of this variable. [ ]
    • Abstract out the duplicated parts of the debian_fallback class [ ] and add descriptions for the file types. [ ]
    • Various commenting and internal documentation improvements. [ ][ ]
    • Rename the Openssl command class to OpenSSLPKCS7 to accommodate other command names with this prefix. [ ]
  • Misc:
    • Rename the --debugger command-line argument to --pdb. [ ]
    • Normalise filesystem stat(2) birth times (ie. st_birthtime) in the same way we do with the stat(1) command s Access: and Change: times to fix a nondeterministic build failure in GNU Guix. (#74)
    • Ignore case when ordering our file format descriptions. [ ]
    • Drop, add and tidy various module imports. [ ][ ][ ][ ]
In addition:
  • Jean-Romain Garnier fixed a general issue where, for example, LibarchiveMember s has_same_content method was called regardless of the underlying type of file. [ ]
  • Daniel Fullmer fixed an issue where some filesystems could only be mounted read-only. (!49)
  • Emanuel Bronshtein provided a patch to prevent a build of the Docker image containing parts of the build s. (#123)
  • Mattia Rizzolo added an entry to debian/py3dist-overrides to ensure the rpm-python module is used in package dependencies (#89) and moved to using the new execute_after_* and execute_before_* Debhelper rules [ ].

Chris Lamb also performed a huge overhaul of diffoscope s website:
  • Add a completely new design. [ ][ ]
  • Dynamically generate our contributor list [ ] and supported file formats [ ] from the main Git repository.
  • Add a separate, canonical page for every new release. [ ][ ][ ]
  • Generate a latest release section and display that with the corresponding date on the homepage. [ ]
  • Add an RSS feed of our releases [ ][ ][ ][ ][ ] and add to Planet Debian [ ].
  • Use Jekyll s absolute_url and relative_url where possible [ ][ ] and move a number of configuration variables to _config.yml [ ][ ].

Upstream patches The Reproducible Builds project detects, dissects and attempts to fix as many currently-unreproducible packages as possible. We endeavour to send all of our patches upstream where appropriate. This month, we wrote a large number of such patches, including:

Other tools Elsewhere in our tooling: strip-nondeterminism is our tool to remove specific non-deterministic results from a completed build. In May, Chris Lamb uploaded version 1.8.1-1 to Debian unstable and Bernhard M. Wiedemann fixed an off-by-one error when parsing PNG image modification times. (#16) In disorderfs, our FUSE-based filesystem that deliberately introduces non-determinism into directory system calls in order to flush out reproducibility issues, Chris Lamb replaced the term dirents in place of directory entries in human-readable output/log messages [ ] and used the astyle source code formatter with the default settings to the main disorderfs.cpp source file [ ]. Holger Levsen bumped the debhelper-compat level to 13 in disorderfs [ ] and reprotest [ ], and for the GNU Guix distribution Vagrant Cascadian updated the versions of disorderfs to version 0.5.10 [ ] and diffoscope to version 145 [ ].

Project documentation & website
  • Carl Dong:
  • Chris Lamb:
    • Rename the Who page to Projects . [ ]
    • Ensure that Jekyll enters the _docs subdirectory to find the _docs/index.md file after an internal move. (#27)
    • Wrap ltmain.sh etc. in preformatted quotes. [ ]
    • Wrap the SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH Python examples onto more lines to prevent visual overflow on the page. [ ]
    • Correct a preferred spelling error. [ ]
  • Holger Levsen:
    • Sort our Academic publications page by publication year [ ] and add Trusting Trust and Fully Countering Trusting Trust through Diverse Double-Compiling [ ].
  • Juri Dispan:

Testing framework We operate a large and many-featured Jenkins-based testing framework that powers tests.reproducible-builds.org that, amongst many other tasks, tracks the status of our reproducibility efforts as well as identifies any regressions that have been introduced. Holger Levsen made the following changes:
  • System health status:
    • Improve page description. [ ]
    • Add more weight to proxy failures. [ ]
    • More verbose debug/failure messages. [ ][ ][ ]
    • Work around strangeness in the Bash shell let VARIABLE=0 exits with an error. [ ]
  • Debian:
    • Fail loudly if there are more than three .buildinfo files with the same name. [ ]
    • Fix a typo which prevented /usr merge variation on Debian unstable. [ ]
    • Temporarily ignore PHP s horde](https://www.horde.org/) packages in Debian bullseye. [ ]
    • Document how to reboot all nodes in parallel, working around molly-guard. [ ]
  • Further work on a Debian package rebuilder:
    • Workaround and document various issues in the debrebuild script. [ ][ ][ ][ ]
    • Improve output in the case of errors. [ ][ ][ ][ ]
    • Improve documentation and future goals [ ][ ][ ][ ], in particular documentiing two real world tests case for an impossible to recreate build environment [ ].
    • Find the right source package to rebuild. [ ]
    • Increase the frequency we run the script. [ ][ ][ ][ ]
    • Improve downloading and selection of the sources to build. [ ][ ][ ]
    • Improve version string handling.. [ ]
    • Handle build failures better. [ ]. [ ]. [ ]
    • Also consider architecture all .buildinfo files. [ ][ ]
In addition:
  • kpcyrd, for Alpine Linux, updated the alpine_schroot.sh script now that a patch for abuild had been released upstream. [ ]
  • Alexander Couzens of the OpenWrt project renamed the brcm47xx target to bcm47xx. [ ]
  • Mattia Rizzolo fixed the printing of the build environment during the second build [ ][ ][ ] and made a number of improvements to the script that deploys Jenkins across our infrastructure [ ][ ][ ].
Lastly, Vagrant Cascadian clarified in the documentation that you need to be user jenkins to run the blacklist command [ ] and the usual build node maintenance was performed was performed by Holger Levsen [ ][ ][ ], Mattia Rizzolo [ ][ ] and Vagrant Cascadian [ ][ ][ ].

Mailing list: There were a number of discussions on our mailing list this month: Paul Spooren started a thread titled Reproducible Builds Verification Format which reopens the discussion around a schema for sharing the results from distributed rebuilders:
To make the results accessible, storable and create tools around them, they should all follow the same schema, a reproducible builds verification format. The format tries to be as generic as possible to cover all open source projects offering precompiled source code. It stores the rebuilder results of what is reproducible and what not.
Hans-Christoph Steiner of the Guardian Project also continued his previous discussion regarding making our website translatable. Lastly, Leo Wandersleb posted a detailed request for feedback on a question of supply chain security and other issues of software review; Leo is the founder of the Wallet Scrutiny project which aims to prove the security of Android Bitcoin Wallets:
Do you own your Bitcoins or do you trust that your app allows you to use your coins while they are actually controlled by them ? Do you have a backup? Do they have a copy they didn t tell you about? Did anybody check the wallet for deliberate backdoors or vulnerabilities? Could anybody check the wallet for those?
Elsewhere, Leo had posted instructions on his attempts to reproduce the binaries for the BlueWallet Bitcoin wallet for iOS and Android platforms.


If you are interested in contributing to the Reproducible Builds project, please visit our Contribute page on our website. However, you can get in touch with us via:

This month s report was written by Bernhard M. Wiedemann, Chris Lamb, Holger Levsen, Jelle van der Waa and Vagrant Cascadian. It was subsequently reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC and the mailing list.

1 June 2020

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities May 2020

Focus This month I didn't have any particular focus. I just worked on issues in my info bubble.

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • nsntrace: talk to upstream about collaborative maintenance
  • Debian: deploy changes, debug issue with GPS markers file generation, migrate bls/DUCK from alioth-archive to salsa
  • Debian website: ran map cron job, synced mirrors
  • Debian wiki: approve accounts, ping folks with bouncing email

Communication

Sponsors The apt-offline work and the libfile-libmagic-perl backports were sponsored. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

31 May 2020

Enrico Zini: Controversial inventors

Paul-F lix Armand-Delille (3 July 1874 in Fourchambault, Ni vre 4 September 1963) was a physician, bacteriologist, professor, and member of the French Academy of Medicine who accidentally brought about the collapse of rabbit populations throughout much of Europe and beyond in the 1950s by infecting them with myxomatosis.
Charles Franklin Kettering (August 29, 1876 November 25, 1958) sometimes known as Charles "Boss" Kettering[1] was an American inventor, engineer, businessman, and the holder of 186 patents.[2] He was a founder of Delco, and was head of research at General Motors from 1920 to 1947. Among his most widely used automotive developments were the electrical starting motor[3] and leaded gasoline.[4][5] In association with the DuPont Chemical Company, he was also responsible for the invention of Freon refrigerant for refrigeration and air conditioning systems. At DuPont he also was responsible for the development of Duco lacquers and enamels, the first practical colored paints for mass-produced automobiles. While working with the Dayton-Wright Company he developed the "Bug" aerial torpedo, considered the world's first aerial missile.[6] He led the advancement of practical, lightweight two-stroke diesel engines, revolutionizing the locomotive and heavy equipment industries. In 1927, he founded the Kettering Foundation, a non-partisan research foundation. He was featured on the cover of Time magazine on January 9, 1933.
John Charles Cutler (June 29, 1915 February 8, 2003) was a senior surgeon, and the acting chief of the venereal disease program in the United States Public Health Service. After his death, his involvement in several controversial and unethical medical studies of syphilis was revealed, including the Guatemala and the Tuskegee syphilis experiments.
Ivy Ledbetter Lee (July 16, 1877 November 9, 1934) was an American publicity expert and a founder of modern public relations. Lee is best known for his public relations work with the Rockefeller family. His first major client was the Pennsylvania Railroad, followed by numerous major railroads such as the New York Central, the Baltimore and Ohio, and the Harriman lines such as the Union Pacific. He established the Association of Railroad Executives, which included providing public relations services to the industry. Lee advised major industrial corporations, including steel, automobile, tobacco, meat packing, and rubber, as well as public utilities, banks, and even foreign governments. Lee pioneered the use of internal magazines to maintain employee morale, as well as management newsletters, stockholder reports, and news releases to the media. He did a great deal of pro bono work, which he knew was important to his own public image, and during World War I, he became the publicity director for the American Red Cross.[1]

29 May 2020

Gunnar Wolf: Heads up Online MiniDebConf is Online

I know most Debian people know about this already But in case you don t follow the usual Debian communications channels, this might interest you! Given most of the world is still under COVID-19 restrictions, and that we want to work on Debian, given there is no certainty as to what the future holds in store for us Our DPL fearless as they always are had the bold initiative to make this weekend into the first-ever miniDebConf Online (MDCO)! miniDebConf Online So, we are already halfway through DebCamp (which means, you can come and hang out with us in the debian.social DebCamp Jitsi lounge, where some impromptu presentations might happen (or not). Starting tomorrow morning (11AM UTC), we will have a quite interesting set of talks. I am reproducing the schedule here:

Saturday 2020.05.30
Time (UTC) Speaker Talk
11:00 - 11:10 MDCO team members Hello + Welcome
11:30 - 11:50 Wouter Verhelst Extrepo
12:00 - 12:45 JP Mengual Debian France, trust european organization
13:00 - 13:20 Arnaud Ferraris Bringing Debian to mobile phones, one package at a time
13:30 - 15:00 Lunch Break A chance for the teams to catch some air
15:00 - 15:45 JP Mengual The community team, United Nations Organizations of Debian?
16:00 - 16:45 Christoph Biedl Clevis and tang - overcoming the disk unlocking problem
17:00 - 17:45 Antonio Terceiro I m a programmer, how can I help Debian

Sunday 2020.05.31
Time (UTC) Speaker Talk
11:00 - 11:45 Andreas Tille The effect of Covid-19 on the Debian Med project
12:00 - 12:45 Paul Gevers BoF: running autopkgtest for your package
13:00 - 13:20 Ben Hutchings debplate: Build many binary packages with templates
13:30 - 15:00 Lunch break A chance for the teams to catch some air
15:00 - 15:45 Holger Levsen Reproducing bullseye in practice
16:00 - 16:45 Jonathan Carter Striving towards excellence
17:00 - 17:45 Delib* Organizing Peer-to-Peer Debian Facilitation Training
18:00 - 18:15 MDCO team members Closing
  • subject to confirmation

Timezone Remember this is an online event, meant for all of the world! Yes, the chosen times seem quite Europe-centric (but they are mostly a function of the times the talk submitters requested). Talks are 11:00 18:00UTC, which means, 06:00 13:00 Mexico (GMT-5), 20:00 03:00 Japan (GMT+9), 04:00 11:00 Western Canada/USA/Mexico (GMT-7) and the rest of the world, somewhere in between. (No, this was clearly not optimized for our dear usual beer team. Sorry! I guess we need you to be fully awake at beertime!)

[update] Connecting! Of course, I didn t make it clear at first how to connect to the Online miniDebConf, silly me!
  • The video streams are available at: https://video.debconf.org/
  • Suggested: tune in to the #minidebconf-online IRC channel in OFTC.
That should be it. Hope to see you there! (Stay home, stay safe )

Gunnar Wolf: Heads up Online MiniDebConf is Online

I know most Debian people know about this already But in case you don t follow the usual Debian communications channels, this might interest you! Given most of the world is still under COVID-19 restrictions, and that we want to work on Debian, given there is no certainty as to what the future holds in store for us Our DPL fearless as they always are had the bold initiative to make this weekend into the first-ever miniDebConf Online (MDCO)! miniDebConf Online So, we are already halfway through DebCamp (which means, you can come and hang out with us in the debian.social DebCamp Jitsi lounge, where some impromptu presentations might happen (or not). Starting tomorrow morning (11AM UTC), we will have a quite interesting set of talks. I am reproducing the schedule here:

Saturday 2020.05.30
Time (UTC) Speaker Talk
11:00 - 11:10 MDCO team members Hello + Welcome
11:30 - 11:50 Wouter Verhelst Extrepo
12:00 - 12:45 JP Mengual Debian France, trust european organization
13:00 - 13:20 Arnaud Ferraris Bringing Debian to mobile phones, one package at a time
13:30 - 15:00 Lunch Break A chance for the teams to catch some air
15:00 - 15:45 JP Mengual The community team, United Nations Organizations of Debian?
16:00 - 16:45 Christoph Biedl Clevis and tang - overcoming the disk unlocking problem
17:00 - 17:45 Antonio Terceiro I m a programmer, how can I help Debian

Sunday 2020.05.31
Time (UTC) Speaker Talk
11:00 - 11:45 Andreas Tille The effect of Covid-19 on the Debian Med project
12:00 - 12:45 Paul Gevers BoF: running autopkgtest for your package
13:00 - 13:20 Ben Hutchings debplate: Build many binary packages with templates
13:30 - 15:00 Lunch break A chance for the teams to catch some air
15:00 - 15:45 Holger Levsen Reproducing bullseye in practice
16:00 - 16:45 Jonathan Carter Striving towards excellence
17:00 - 17:45 Delib* Organizing Peer-to-Peer Debian Facilitation Training
18:00 - 18:15 MDCO team members Closing
  • subject to confirmation

Timezone Remember this is an online event, meant for all of the world! Yes, the chosen times seem quite Europe-centric (but they are mostly a function of the times the talk submitters requested). Talks are 11:00 18:00UTC, which means, 06:00 13:00 Mexico (GMT-5), 20:00 03:00 Japan (GMT+9), 04:00 11:00 Western Canada/USA/Mexico (GMT-7) and the rest of the world, somewhere in between. (No, this was clearly not optimized for our dear usual beer team. Sorry! I guess we need you to be fully awake at beertime!)

[update] Connecting! Of course, I didn t make it clear at first how to connect to the Online miniDebConf, silly me!
  • The video streams are available at: https://video.debconf.org/
  • Suggested: tune in to the #minidebconf-online IRC channel in OFTC.
That should be it. Hope to see you there! (Stay home, stay safe )

24 May 2020

Enrico Zini: Music links

It's the end of the world as we know it, twice as fast
After Homemade Instruments Week on the facebook page, here is an article with some PVC pipes instruments! Percussion on PVC pipes A classic, long pipes for big bass, easy to tune by changing the length
"Ut queant laxis" or "Hymnus in Ioannem" is a Latin hymn in honor of John the Baptist, written in Horatian Sapphics and traditionally attributed to Paulus Diaconus, the eighth-century Lombard historian. It is famous for its part in the history of musical notation, in particular solmization. The hymn belongs to the tradition of Gregorian chant.

17 May 2020

Enrico Zini: Art links

Guglielmo Achille Cavellini (11 September 1914 20 November 1990), also known as GAC, was an Italian artist and art collector. After an initial activity as a painter, in the 1940s and 1950s he became one of the major collectors of contemporary Italian abstract art, developing a deep relationship of patronage and friendship with the artists. This experience has its pinnacle in the exhibition Modern painters of the Cavellini collection at the National Gallery of Modern Art in Rome in 1957. In the 1960s Cavellini resumed his activity as an artist, with an ample production spanning from Neo-Dada to performance art to mail art, of which he became one of the prime exponents with the Exhibitions at Home and the Round Trip works. In 1971 he invented autostoricizzazione (self-historicization), upon which he acted to create a deliberate popular history surrounding his existence. He also authored the books Abstract Art (1959), Man painter (1960), Diary of Guglielmo Achille Cavellini (1975), Encounters/Clashes in the Jungle of Art (1977) and Life of a Genius (1989).
Paul Gustave Louis Christophe Dor (/d re /; French: [ ys.tav d . e]; 6 January 1832 23 January 1883[1]) was a French artist, printmaker, illustrator, comics artist, caricaturist, and sculptor who worked primarily with wood-engraving.
Enrico Baj era bravissimo a pij per culo er potere usanno a fantasia. Co quaa sempricit che solo dii granni, raccatta robbe tipo bottoni, pezzi de stoffa, cordoni, passamanerie varie, e l appiccica su a tela insieme aa pittura sua: che pare quasi che sta a gioc ma giocanno giocanno, zitto zitto, riesce a rovesci er monno. >>

12 May 2020

Jacob Adams: Roman Finger Counting

I recently wrote a final paper on the history of written numerals. In the process, I discovered this fascinating tidbit that didn t really fit in my paper, but I wanted to put it somewhere. So I m writing about it here. If I were to ask you to count as high as you could on your fingers you d probably get up to 10 before running out of fingers. You can t count any higher than the number of fingers you have, right? The Romans could! They used a place-value system, combined with various gestures to count all the way up to 9,999 on two hands.

The System Finger Counting (Note that in this diagram 60 is, in fact, wrong, and this picture swaps the hundreds and the thousands.) We ll start with the units. The last three fingers of the left hand, middle, ring, and pinkie, are used to form them. Zero is formed with an open hand, the opposite of the finger counting we re used to. One is formed by bending the middle joint of the pinkie, two by including the ring finger and three by including the middle finger, all at the middle joint. You ll want to keep all these bends fairly loose, as otherwise these numbers can get quite uncomfortable. For four, you extend your pinkie again, for five, also raise your ring finger, and for six, you raise your middle finger as well, but then lower your ring finger. For seven you bend your pinkie at the bottom joint, for eight adding your ring finger, and for nine, including your middle finger. This mirrors what you did for one, two and three, but bending the finger at the bottom joint now instead. This leaves your thumb and index finger for the tens. For ten, touch the nail of your index finger to the inside of your top thumb joint. For twenty, put your thumb between your index and middle fingers. For thirty, touch the nails of your thumb and index fingers. For forty, bend your index finger slightly towards your palm and place your thumb between the middle and top knuckle of your index finger. For fifty, place your thumb against your palm. For sixty, leave your thumb where it is and wrap your index finger around it (the diagram above is wrong). For seventy, move your thumb so that the nail touches between the middle and top knuckle of your index finger. For eighty, flip your thumb so that the bottom of it now touches the spot between the middle and top knuckle of your index finger. For ninety, touch the nail of your index finger to your bottom thumb joint. The hundreds and thousands use the same positions on the right hand, with the units being the thousands and the tens being the hundreds. One account, from which the picture above comes, swaps these two, but the first account we have uses this ordering. Combining all these symbols, you can count all the way to 9,999 yourself on just two hands. Try it!

History

The Venerable Bede The first written record of this system comes from the Venerable Bede, an English Benedictine monk who died in 735. He wrote De computo vel loquela digitorum, On Calculating and Speaking with the Fingers, as the introduction to a larger work on chronology, De temporum ratione. (The primary calculation done by monks at the time was calculating the date of Easter, the first Sunday after the first full moon of spring). He also includes numbers from 10,000 to 1,000,000, but its unknown if these were inventions of the author and were likely rarely used regardless. They require moving your hands to various positions on your body, as illustrated below, from Jacob Leupold s Theatrum Arilhmetico-Geometricum, published in 1727: Finger Counting with Large Numbers

The Romans If Bede was the first to write it, how do we know that it came from Roman times? It s referenced in many Roman writings, including this bit from the Roman satirist Juvenal who died in 130:
Felix nimirum qui tot per saecula mortem distulit atque suos iam dextera computat annos. Happy is he who so many times over the years has cheated death And now reckons his age on the right hand.
Because of course the right hand is where one counts hundreds! There s also this Roman riddle:
Nunc mihi iam credas fieri quod posse negatur: octo tenes manibus, si me monstrante magistro sublatis septem reliqui tibi sex remanebunt. Now you shall believe what you would deny could be done: In your hands you hold eight, as my teacher once taught; Take away seven, and six still remain.
If you form eight with this system and then remove the symbol for seven, you get the symbol for six!

Sources My source for this blog post is Paul Broneer s 1969 English translation of Karl Menninger s Zahlwort und Ziffer (Number Words and Number Symbols).

1 May 2020

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities April 2020

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • myrepos: fix the forum
  • Debian: restart non-responsive tor daemon, restart processes due to OOM, apply debian.net changes for DD with expired key
  • Debian wiki: approve accounts
  • Debian QA services: deploy changes, auto-disable oldoldstable pockets

Communication

Sponsors The purple-discord work was sponsored by my employer. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

1 April 2020

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities March 2020

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • Debian wiki: approve accounts

Communication

Sponsors The dh-make-perl feature requests, file bug report, File::Libmagic changes, autoconf-archive change, libpst work and the purple-discord upload were sponsored by my employer. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

29 March 2020

Paulo Henrique de Lima Santana: My free software activities in February 2020

My free software activities in february 2020 March is ending but I finally wrote my monthly report about activities in Debian and Free Software in general for February. As I already wrote here, I attended to FOSDEM 2020 on February 1st and 2nd in Brussels. It was a amazing experience. After my return to Curitiba, I felt my energies renewed to start new challenges.

MiniDebConf Macei 2020 I continued helping to organize MiniDebConf and I got positive answers from 4Linux and Globo.com and they are sponsorsing the event.

FLISOL 2020 I started to talk with Maristela from IEP - Instituto de Engenharia do Paran and after some messages and I joined a meeting with her and other members of C mara T cnica de Eletr nica, Computa o e Ci ncias de Dados. I explained about FLISOL in Curitiba to them and they agreed to host the event at IEP. I asked to use three spaces: Auditorium for FLISOL talks, Sal o Nobre for meetups from WordPress and PostgreSQL Communities, and the hall for Install Fest. Besides FLISOL, they would like to host other events and meetups from Communities in Curitiba as Python, PHP, and so on. At least one per month. I helped to schedule a PHP Paran Community meetup on March.

New job Since 17th I started to work at Rentcars as Infrastructure Analyst. I m very happy to work there because we use a lot of FLOSS and with nice people. Ubuntu LTS is the approved OS for desktops but I could install Debian on my laptop :-)

Misc I signed pgp keys from friends I met in Brussels and I had my pgp key signed by them. Finally my MR to the DebConf20 website fixing some texts was accepted. I have watched v deos from FOSDEM
  1. Until now, I saw these great talks:
  • Growing Sustainable Contributions Through Ambassador Networks
  • Building Ethical Software Under Capitalism
  • Cognitive biases, blindspots and inclusion
  • Building a thriving community in company-led open source projects
  • Building Community for your Company s OSS Projects
  • The Ethics of Open Source
  • Be The Leader You Need in Open Source
  • The next generation of contributors is not on IRC
  • Open Source Won, but Software Freedom Hasn t Yet
  • Open Source Under Attack
  • Lessons Learned from Cultivating Open Source Projects and Communities
That s all folks!

22 March 2020

Enrico Zini: Notable people

Lotte Reiniger. The Unsung Heroine of Early Animation
history people wikipedia
Lotte Reiniger pioneered early animation, yet her name remains largely unknown. We pay homage to her life and work, and reflect on why she never received the recognition she deserves.
Stephen Wolfram shares what he learned in researching Ada Lovelace's life, writings about the Analytical Engine, and computation of Bernoulli numbers.
Elizabeth Cochran Seaman[1] (May 5, 1864[2] January 27, 1922), better known by her pen name Nellie Bly, was an American journalist who was widely known for her record-breaking trip around the world in 72 days, in emulation of Jules Verne's fictional character Phileas Fogg, and an expos in which she worked undercover to report on a mental institution from within.[3] She was a pioneer in her field, and launched a new kind of investigative journalism.[4] Bly was also a writer, inventor, and industrialist.
Delia Ann Derbyshire (5 May 1937 3 July 2001)[1] was an English musician and composer of electronic music.[2] She carried out pioneering work with the BBC Radiophonic Workshop during the 1960s, including her electronic arrangement of the theme music to the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who.[3][4] She has been referred to as "the unsung heroine of British electronic music,"[3] having influenced musicians including Aphex Twin, the Chemical Brothers and Paul Hartnoll of Orbital.[5]
Charity Adams Earley (5 December 1918 13 January 2002) was the first African-American woman to be an officer in the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (later WACS) and was the commanding officer of the first battalion of African-American women to serve overseas during World War II. Adams was the highest ranking African-American woman in the army by the completion of the war.

1 March 2020

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities February 2020

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • Debian wiki: deploy changes, unblock IP addresses, approve new accounts, auto-approve email domains

Communication

Sponsors The apt-offline backport and purple-discord uploads were sponsored by my employer. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

10 November 2017

Paulo Santana: Hello world

I'm Debian Maintainer since january 2017.

31 October 2017

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities October 2017

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • Debian: respond to mail debug request, redirect hardware access seeker to guest account, redirect hardware donors to porters, redirect interview seeker to DPL, reboot system with dead service
  • Debian mentors: security updates, reboot
  • Debian wiki: upgrade search db format, remove incorrect bans, whitelist email addresses, disable accounts with bouncing email, update email for accounts with bouncing email
  • Debian website: remove need for a website rebuild
  • Openmoko: restart web server, set web server process limits, install monitoring tool

Sponsors The talloc/cmocka uploads and the remmina issue were sponsored by my employer. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

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