Search Results: "luca"

12 October 2021

Antonio Terceiro: Triaging Debian build failure logs with collab-qa-tools

The Ruby team is working now on transitioning to ruby 3.0. Even though most packages will work just fine, there is substantial amount of packages that require some work to adapt. We have been doing test rebuilds for a while during transitions, but usually triaged the problems manually. This time I decided to try collab-qa-tools, a set of scripts Lucas Nussbaum uses when he does archive-wide rebuilds. I'm really glad that I did, because those tols save a lot of time when processing a large number of build failures. In this post, I will go through how to triage a set of build logs using collab-qa-tools. I have some some improvements to the code. Given my last merge request is very new and was not merged yet, a few of the things I mention here may apply only to my own ruby3.0 branch. collab-qa-tools also contains a few tools do perform the builds in the cloud, but since we already had the builds done, I will not be mentioning that part and will write exclusively about the triaging tools. Installing collab-qa-tools The first step is to clone the git repository. Make sure you have the dependencies from debian/control installed (a few Ruby libraries). One of the patches I sent, and was already accepted, is the ability to run it without the need to install:
source /path/to/collab-qa-tools/activate.sh
This will add the tools to your $PATH. Preparation The first think you need to do is getting all your build logs in a directory. The tools assume .log file extension, and they can be named $ PACKAGE _*.log or just $ PACKAGE .log. Creating a TODO file
cqa-scanlogs   grep -v OK > todo
todo will contain one line for each log with a summary of the failure, if it's able to find one. collab-qa-tools has a large set of regular expressions for finding errors in the build logs It's a good idea to split the TODO file in multiple ones. This can easily be done with split(1), and can be used to delimit triaging sessions, and/or to split the triaging between multiple people. For example this will create todo into todo00, todo01, ..., each containing 30 lines:
split --lines=30 --numeric-suffixes todo todo
Triaging You can now do the triaging. Let's say we split the TODO files, and will start with todo01. The first step is calling cqa-fetchbugs (it does what it says on the tin):
cqa-fetchbugs --TODO=todo01
Then, cqa-annotate will guide you through the logs and allow you to report bugs:
cqa-annotate --TODO=todo01
I wrote myself a process.sh wrapper script for cqa-fetchbugs and cqa-annotate that looks like this:
#!/bin/sh
set -eu
for todo in $@; do
  # force downloading bugs
  awk ' print(".bugs." $1) ' "$ todo "   xargs rm -f
  cqa-fetchbugs --TODO="$ todo "
  cqa-annotate \
    --template=template.txt.jinja2 \
    --TODO="$ todo "
done
The --template option is a recent contribution of mine. This is a template for the bug reports you will be sending. It uses Liquid templates, which is very similar to Jinja2 for Python. You will notice that I am even pretending it is Jinja2 to trick vim into doing syntax highlighting for me. The template I'm using looks like this:
From:   fullname   <  email  >
To: submit@bugs.debian.org
Subject:   package  : FTBFS with ruby3.0:   summary  
Source:   package  
Version:   version   split:'+rebuild'   first  
Severity: serious
Justification: FTBFS
Tags: bookworm sid ftbfs
User: debian-ruby@lists.debian.org
Usertags: ruby3.0
Hi,
We are about to enable building against ruby3.0 on unstable. During a test
rebuild,   package   was found to fail to build in that situation.
To reproduce this locally, you need to install ruby-all-dev from experimental
on an unstable system or build chroot.
Relevant part (hopefully):
 % for line in extract % >   line  
 % endfor % 
The full build log is available at
https://people.debian.org/~kanashiro/ruby3.0/round2/builds/3/  package  /  filename   replace:".log",".build.txt"  
The cqa-annotate loop cqa-annotate will parse each log file, display an extract of what it found as possibly being the relevant part, and wait for your input:
######## ruby-cocaine_0.5.8-1.1+rebuild1633376733_amd64.log ########
--------- Error:
     Failure/Error: undef_method :exitstatus
     FrozenError:
       can't modify frozen object: pid 2351759 exit 0
     # ./spec/support/unsetting_exitstatus.rb:4:in  undef_method'
     # ./spec/support/unsetting_exitstatus.rb:4:in  singleton class'
     # ./spec/support/unsetting_exitstatus.rb:3:in  assuming_no_processes_have_been_run'
     # ./spec/cocaine/errors_spec.rb:55:in  block (2 levels) in <top (required)>'
Deprecation Warnings:
Using  should  from rspec-expectations' old  :should  syntax without explicitly enabling the syntax is deprecated. Use the new  :expect  syntax or explicitly enable  :should  with  config.expect_with(:rspec)    c  c.syntax = :should   instead. Called from /<<PKGBUILDDIR>>/spec/cocaine/command_line/runners/backticks_runner_spec.rb:19:in  block (2 levels) in <top (required)>'.
If you need more of the backtrace for any of these deprecations to
identify where to make the necessary changes, you can configure
 config.raise_errors_for_deprecations! , and it will turn the
deprecation warnings into errors, giving you the full backtrace.
1 deprecation warning total
Finished in 6.87 seconds (files took 2.68 seconds to load)
67 examples, 1 failure
Failed examples:
rspec ./spec/cocaine/errors_spec.rb:54 # When an error happens does not blow up if running the command errored before execution
/usr/bin/ruby3.0 -I/usr/share/rubygems-integration/all/gems/rspec-support-3.9.3/lib:/usr/share/rubygems-integration/all/gems/rspec-core-3.9.2/lib /usr/share/rubygems-integration/all/gems/rspec-core-3.9.2/exe/rspec --pattern ./spec/\*\*/\*_spec.rb --format documentation failed
ERROR: Test "ruby3.0" failed:
----------------
ERROR: Test "ruby3.0" failed:      Failure/Error: undef_method :exitstatus
----------------
package: ruby-cocaine
lines: 30
------------------------------------------------------------------------
s: skip
i: ignore this package permanently
r: report new bug
f: view full log
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Action [s i r f]:
You can then choose one of the options: When there are existing bugs in the package, cqa-annotate will list them among the options. If you choose a bug number, the TODO file will be annotated with that bug number and new runs of cqa-annotate will not ask about that package anymore. For example after I reported a bug for ruby-cocaine for the issue listed above, I aborted with a ctrl-c, and when I run my process.sh script again I then get this prompt:
----------------
ERROR: Test "ruby3.0" failed:      Failure/Error: undef_method :exitstatus
----------------
package: ruby-cocaine
lines: 30
------------------------------------------------------------------------
s: skip
i: ignore this package permanently
1: 996206 serious ruby-cocaine: FTBFS with ruby3.0: ERROR: Test "ruby3.0" failed:      Failure/Error: undef_method :exitstatus  
r: report new bug
f: view full log
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Action [s i 1 r f]:
Chosing 1 will annotate the TODO file with the bug number, and I'm done with this package. Only a few other hundreds to go.

19 June 2021

Chris Lamb: *Raiders of the Lost Ark*: 40 Years On

"Again, we see there is nothing you can possess which I cannot take away."
The cinema was a rare and expensive treat in my youth, so I first came across Raiders of the Lost Ark by recording it from television onto a poor quality VHS. I only mention this as it meant I watched a slightly different film to the one intended, as my copy somehow missed off the first 10 minutes. For those not as intimately familiar with the film as me, this is just in time to see a Belloq demand Dr. Jones hand over the Peruvian head (see above), just in time to learn that Indy loathes snakes, and just in time to see the inadvertent reproduction of two Europeans squabbling over the spoils of a foreign land. What this truncation did to my interpretation of the film (released thirty years ago today on June 19th 1981) is interesting to explore. Without Jones' physical and moral traits being demonstrated on-screen (as well as missing the weighing the gold head and the rollercoaster boulder scene), it actually made the idea of 'Indiana Jones' even more of a mythical archetype. The film wisely withholds Jones' backstory, but my directors cut deprived him of even more, and counterintuitively imbued him with even more of a legendary hue as the elision made his qualities an assumption beyond question. Indiana Jones, if you can excuse the clich , needed no introduction at all. Good artists copy, great artists steal. And oh boy, does Raiders steal. I've watched this film about twenty times over the past two decades and it's now firmly entered into my personal canon. But watching it on its thirtieth anniversary was different not least because I could situate it in a broader cinematic context. For example, I now see the Gestapo officer in Major Strasser from Casablanca (1942), in fact just as I can with many of Raiders' other orientalist tendencies: not only in its breezy depictions of backwards sand people, but also of North Africa as an entrep t and playground for a certain kind of Western gangster. The opening as well, set in an equally reductionist pseudo-Peru, now feels like Werner Herzog's Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972) but without, of course, any self-conscious colonial critique.
The imagery of the ark appears to be borrowed from James Tissot's The Ark Passes Over the Jordan, part of the fin de siecle fascination with the occult and (ironically enough given the background of Raiders' director), a French Catholic revival.
I can now also appreciate some of the finer edges that make this film just so much damn fun to watch. For instance, the comic book conceit that Jones and Belloq are a 'shadowy reflection' of one other and that they need 'only a nudge' to make one like the other. As is the idea that Belloq seems to be actually enjoying being evil. I also spotted Jones rejecting the martini on the plane. This feels less like a comment on corrupting effect of alcohol (he drinks rather heavily elsewhere in the film), but rather a subtle distancing from James Bond. This feels especially important given that the action-packed cold open is, let us be honest for a second, ripped straight from the 007 franchise. John William's soundtracks are always worth mentioning. The corny Raiders March does almost nothing for me, but the highly-underrated 'Ark theme' certainly does. I delight in its allusions to Gregorian chant, the diabolus in musica and the Hungarian minor scale, fusing the Christian doctrine of the Holy Trinity (the stacked thirds, get it?), the ars antiqua of the Middle Ages with an 'exotic' twist that the Russian Five associated with central European Judaism.
The best use of the ark leitmotif is, of course, when it is opened. Here, Indy and Marion are saved by not opening their eyes whilst the 'High Priest' Belloq and the rest of the Nazis are all melted away. I'm no Biblical scholar, but I'm almost certain they were alluding to Leviticus 16:2 here:
The Lord said to Moses: Tell your brother Aaron that he is not to come whenever he chooses into the Most Holy Place behind the curtain in front of the atonement cover on the ark, or else he will die, for I will appear in the cloud above the mercy seat.
But would it be too much of a stretch to also see the myth of Orpheus and Eurydices too? Orpheus's wife would only be saved from the underworld if he did not turn around until he came to his own house. But he turned round to look at his wife, and she instantly slipped back into the depths:
For he who overcome should turn back his gaze
Towards the Tartarean cave,
Whatever excellence he takes with him
He loses when he looks on those below.
Perhaps not, given that Marion and the ark are not lost in quite the same way. But whilst touching on gender, it was interesting to update my view of archaeologist Ren Belloq. To countermand his slight queer coding (a trope of Disney villains such as Scar, Jafar, Cruella, etc.), there is a rather clumsy subplot involving Belloq repeatedly (and half-heartedly) failing to seduce Marion. This disavows any idea that Belloq isn't firmly heterosexual, essential for the film's mainstream audience, but it is especially important in Raiders because, if we recall the relationship between Belloq and Jones: 'it would take only a nudge to make you like me'. (This would definitely put a new slant on 'Top men'.)
However, my favourite moment is where the Nazis place the ark in a crate in order to transport it to the deserted island. On route, the swastikas on the side of the crate spontaneously burn away, and a disturbing noise is heard in the background. This short scene has always fascinated me, partly because it's the first time in the film that the power of the ark is demonstrated first-hand but also because gives the object an other-worldly nature that, to the best of my knowledge, has no parallel in the rest of cinema. Still, I had always assumed that the Aak disfigured the swastikas because of their association with the Nazis, interpreting the act as God's condemnation of the Third Reich. But now I catch myself wondering whether the ark would have disfigured any iconography as a matter of principle or whether their treatment was specific to the swastika. We later get a partial answer to this question, as the 'US Army' inscriptions in the Citizen Kane warehouse remain untouched. Far from being an insignificant concern, the filmmakers appear to have wandered into a highly-contested theological debate. As in, if the burning of the swastika is God's moral judgement of the Nazi regime, then God is clearly both willing and able to intervene in human affairs. So why did he not, to put it mildly, prevent Auschwitz? From this perspective, Spielberg appears to be limbering up for some of the academic critiques surrounding Holocaust representations that will follow Schindler's List (1993). Given my nostalgic and somewhat ironic attachment to Raiders, it will always be difficult for me to objectively appraise the film. Even so, it feels like it is underpinned by an earnest attempt to entertain the viewer, largely absent in the affected cynicism of contemporary cinema. And when considered in the totality of Hollywood's output, its tonal and technical flaws are not actually that bad or at least Marion's muddled characterisation and its breezy chauvinism (for example) clearly have far worse examples. Perhaps the most remarkable thing about the film in 2021 is that it hasn't changed that much at all. It spawned one good sequel (The Last Crusade), one bad one (The Temple of Doom), and one hardly worth mentioning at all, yet these adventures haven't affected the original Raiders in any meaningful way. In fact, if anything has affected the original text it is, once again, George Lucas himself, as knowing the impending backlash around the Star Wars prequels adds an inadvertent paratext to all his earlier works. Yet in a 1978 discussion prior to the creation of Raiders, you can get a keen sense of how Lucas' childlike enthusiasm will always result in something either extremely good or something extremely bad somehow no middle ground is quite possible. Yes, it's easy to rubbish his initial ideas 'We'll call him Indiana Smith! but hasn't Lucas actually captured the essence of a heroic 'Americana' here, and that the final result is simply a difference of degree, not kind?

Chris Lamb: Raiders of the Lost Ark: 40 Years On

"Again, we see there is nothing you can possess which I cannot take away."
The cinema was a rare and expensive treat in my youth, so I first came across Raiders of the Lost Ark by recording it from television onto a poor quality VHS. I only mention this as it meant I watched a slightly different film to the one intended, as my copy somehow missed off the first 10 minutes. For those not as intimately familiar with the film as me, this is just in time to see a Belloq demand Dr. Jones hand over the Peruvian head (see above), just in time to learn that Indy loathes snakes, and just in time to see the inadvertent reproduction of two Europeans squabbling over the spoils of a foreign land. What this truncation did to my interpretation of the film (released thirty years ago today on June 19th 1981) is interesting to explore. Without Jones' physical and moral traits being demonstrated on-screen (as well as missing the weighing the gold head and the rollercoaster boulder scene), it actually made the idea of 'Indiana Jones' even more of a mythical archetype. The film wisely withholds Jones' backstory, but my directors cut deprived him of even more, and counterintuitively imbued him with even more of a legendary hue as the elision made his qualities an assumption beyond question. Indiana Jones, if you can excuse the clich , needed no introduction at all. Good artists copy, great artists steal. And oh boy, does Raiders steal. I've watched this film about twenty times over the past two decades and it's now firmly entered into my personal canon. But watching it on its thirtieth anniversary was different not least because I could situate it in a broader cinematic context. For example, I now see the Gestapo officer in Major Strasser from Casablanca (1942), in fact just as I can with many of Raiders' other orientalist tendencies: not only in its breezy depictions of backwards sand people, but also of North Africa as an entrep t and playground for a certain kind of Western gangster. The opening as well, set in an equally reductionist pseudo-Peru, now feels like Werner Herzog's Aguirre, the Wrath of God (1972) but without, of course, any self-conscious colonial critique.
The imagery of the ark appears to be borrowed from James Tissot's The Ark Passes Over the Jordan, part of the fin de siecle fascination with the occult and (ironically enough given the background of Raiders' director), a French Catholic revival.
I can now also appreciate some of the finer edges that make this film just so much damn fun to watch. For instance, the comic book conceit that Jones and Belloq are a 'shadowy reflection' of one other and that they need 'only a nudge' to make one like the other. As is the idea that Belloq seems to be actually enjoying being evil. I also spotted Jones rejecting the martini on the plane. This feels less like a comment on corrupting effect of alcohol (he drinks rather heavily elsewhere in the film), but rather a subtle distancing from James Bond. This feels especially important given that the action-packed cold open is, let us be honest for a second, ripped straight from the 007 franchise. John William's soundtracks are always worth mentioning. The corny Raiders March does almost nothing for me, but the highly-underrated 'Ark theme' certainly does. I delight in its allusions to Gregorian chant, the diabolus in musica and the Hungarian minor scale, fusing the Christian doctrine of the Holy Trinity (the stacked thirds, get it?), the ars antiqua of the Middle Ages with an 'exotic' twist that the Russian Five associated with central European Judaism.
The best use of the ark leitmotif is, of course, when it is opened. Here, Indy and Marion are saved by not opening their eyes whilst the 'High Priest' Belloq and the rest of the Nazis are all melted away. I'm no Biblical scholar, but I'm almost certain they were alluding to Leviticus 16:2 here:
The Lord said to Moses: Tell your brother Aaron that he is not to come whenever he chooses into the Most Holy Place behind the curtain in front of the atonement cover on the ark, or else he will die, for I will appear in the cloud above the mercy seat.
But would it be too much of a stretch to also see the myth of Orpheus and Eurydices too? Orpheus's wife would only be saved from the underworld if he did not turn around until he came to his own house. But he turned round to look at his wife, and she instantly slipped back into the depths:
For he who overcome should turn back his gaze
Towards the Tartarean cave,
Whatever excellence he takes with him
He loses when he looks on those below.
Perhaps not, given that Marion and the ark are not lost in quite the same way. But whilst touching on gender, it was interesting to update my view of archaeologist Ren Belloq. To countermand his slight queer coding (a trope of Disney villains such as Scar, Jafar, Cruella, etc.), there is a rather clumsy subplot involving Belloq repeatedly (and half-heartedly) failing to seduce Marion. This disavows any idea that Belloq isn't firmly heterosexual, essential for the film's mainstream audience, but it is especially important in Raiders because, if we recall the relationship between Belloq and Jones: 'it would take only a nudge to make you like me'. (This would definitely put a new slant on 'Top men'.)
However, my favourite moment is where the Nazis place the ark in a crate in order to transport it to the deserted island. On route, the swastikas on the side of the crate spontaneously burn away, and a disturbing noise is heard in the background. This short scene has always fascinated me, partly because it's the first time in the film that the power of the ark is demonstrated first-hand but also because gives the object an other-worldly nature that, to the best of my knowledge, has no parallel in the rest of cinema. Still, I had always assumed that the Aak disfigured the swastikas because of their association with the Nazis, interpreting the act as God's condemnation of the Third Reich. But now I catch myself wondering whether the ark would have disfigured any iconography as a matter of principle or whether their treatment was specific to the swastika. We later get a partial answer to this question, as the 'US Army' inscriptions in the Citizen Kane warehouse remain untouched. Far from being an insignificant concern, the filmmakers appear to have wandered into a highly-contested theological debate. As in, if the burning of the swastika is God's moral judgement of the Nazi regime, then God is clearly both willing and able to intervene in human affairs. So why did he not, to put it mildly, prevent Auschwitz? From this perspective, Spielberg appears to be limbering up for some of the academic critiques surrounding Holocaust representations that will follow Schindler's List (1993). Given my nostalgic and somewhat ironic attachment to Raiders, it will always be difficult for me to objectively appraise the film. Even so, it feels like it is underpinned by an earnest attempt to entertain the viewer, largely absent in the affected cynicism of contemporary cinema. And when considered in the totality of Hollywood's output, its tonal and technical flaws are not actually that bad or at least Marion's muddled characterisation and its breezy chauvinism (for example) clearly have far worse examples. Perhaps the most remarkable thing about the film in 2021 is that it hasn't changed that much at all. It spawned one good sequel (The Last Crusade), one bad one (The Temple of Doom), and one hardly worth mentioning at all, yet these adventures haven't affected the original Raiders in any meaningful way. In fact, if anything has affected the original text it is, once again, George Lucas himself, as knowing the impending backlash around the Star Wars prequels adds an inadvertent paratext to all his earlier works. Yet in a 1978 discussion prior to the creation of Raiders, you can get a keen sense of how Lucas' childlike enthusiasm will always result in something either extremely good or something extremely bad somehow no middle ground is quite possible. Yes, it's easy to rubbish his initial ideas 'We'll call him Indiana Smith! but hasn't Lucas actually captured the essence of a heroic 'Americana' here, and that the final result is simply a difference of degree, not kind?

15 May 2021

Utkarsh Gupta: Hello, Canonical! o/

Today marks the 90th day of me joining Canonical to work on Ubuntu full-time! So since it s been a while already, this blog post is long due. :)

The News
I joined Canonical, this February, to work on Ubuntu full-time! \o/
Those who know, they know that this is really very exciting for me because Canonical has been a dream company for me, for real (more about this below!). And hey, this is my first job, ever, so all the more reason to be psyched about, isn t it? ^_^ P.S. Keep reading and we ll meet my squad really sooon!

The Story Being an undergrad student (batch 2017-2021), I ve been slightly worried during my last two semesters, naturally, thinking about how s it all gonna pan out and what will I be doing, et al, because I ve been seeing all my friends and batchmates getting placed in companies or going for masters or at least having some sort of plans for their future and I, on the other hand, was hopelessly clueless. :D Well, to be fair, I did Google Summer of Code twice, in 2019 and 2020, became a Debian Developer in 2019, been a part of GCI and Outreachy, contributed to over dozens of open-source projects, et al, et al. So I wasn t all completely hopeless but for sure was completely clueless , heh. And for full disclosure, I was only slightly panicking because firstly, I did get placed in several companies and secondly, I didn t really need a job immediately since I was already getting paid to work on Debian stuff by Freexian, which was good enough. :)
(and honestly, Freexian has my whole heart! - more on that later sometime.) But that s not the point. I was still confused and worried and my mom & dad, more so than anyone. Ugh. We were all figuring out and she asked me places that I was interested to work in. And whilst I wasn t clear about things I wanted to do (and still am!) but I was (very) clear about this and so I told her about Canonical and also did tell her that it s a bit too ambitious for me to think about it now so I ll probably apply after some experience or something. and as they say, the world works in mysterious ways and well, it did for me! So back during the Ruby sprints (Feb 20), Kanashiro, the guy ( ), mentioned that his team was hiring and has a vacant position but I won t be eligible since I was still in my junior year. It was since then I ve been actively praying for Cronus, the god of time, to wave his magic wand and align it in such a way that the next opening should be somewhere near my graduation. And guess what? IT HAPPENED! 9 months later, in November 20, Kanashiro told me his team is hiring yet again and that I could apply this time! Without much (since there was some ) delay, I applied and started asking all sorts of questions to Kanashiro. No words are enough for him, he literally helped me throughout the process; from referring me to answering all sorts of doubts I had! And roughly after 2 months of interviewing, et al, my ambitious dream did come true and I finalyyyy signed my contract! \o/
(the interview process and what went on during those 10 weeks is a story for later ;))

The Server Team! \o This position, which I didn t mention earlier, was for the Server Team which is a team of 15 people, working to make Ubuntu server the best! And as I tweeted sometime back, the team is absolutely lovely, super kind, and consists of the best of teammates one could possibly ask for! Here s a quick sneak peek into our weekly team meeting. Thanks to Rafael for taking such a lovely picture. And yes, the cat Luna is a part of our squad! And oh, did I mention that we re completely remote and distributed?
FUN FACT: Our team covers all the TZs, that is, at any point of time (during weekdays), you ll find someone or the other from the team around! \o/ Anyway, our squad, managed by Rick is divided into two halves: Squeaky Wheels and Table Flip. Cool names, right?
Squeaky Wheels does the distro side of stuff and consists of Christian, Andreas, Rafael, Robie, Bryce, Sergio, Kanashiro, Athos, and now myself as well! And OTOH, Table Flip consists of Dan, Chad, Paride, Lucas, James, and Grant. Even though I interact w/ Squeaky Wheels more (basically daily), each of my teammates is absolutely lovely and equally awesome! Whilst I ll talk more about things here in the upcoming months, this is it for now! If there s anything, in particular, you d like to know more about, let me know! And lastly, here s us vibing our way through, making Ubuntu server better, cause that s how we roll!
Until next time.
:wq for today.

11 November 2020

Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in October 2020

Welcome to the October 2020 report from the Reproducible Builds project. In our monthly reports, we outline the major things that we have been up to over the past month. As a brief reminder, the motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to ensure flaws have not been introduced in the binaries we install on our systems. If you are interested in contributing to the project, please visit our main website.

General On Saturday 10th October, Morten Linderud gave a talk at Arch Conf Online 2020 on The State of Reproducible Builds in Arch. The video should be available later this month, but as a teaser:
The previous year has seen great progress in Arch Linux to get reproducible builds in the hands of the users and developers. In this talk we will explore the current tooling that allows users to reproduce packages, the rebuilder software that has been written to check packages and the current issues in this space.
During the Reproducible Builds summit in Marrakesh in 2019, developers from the GNU Guix, NixOS and Debian distributions were able to produce a bit-for-bit identical GNU Mes binary despite using three different versions of GCC. Since this summit, additional work resulted in a bit-for-bit identical Mes binary using tcc, and last month a fuller update was posted to this effect by the individuals involved. This month, however, David Wheeler updated his extensive page on Fully Countering Trusting Trust through Diverse Double-Compiling, remarking that:
GNU Mes rebuild is definitely an application of [Diverse Double-Compiling]. [..] This is an awesome application of DDC, and I believe it s the first publicly acknowledged use of DDC on a binary
There was a small, followup discussion on our mailing list. In openSUSE, Bernhard M. Wiedemann published his monthly Reproducible Builds status update. This month, the Reproducible Builds project restarted our IRC meetings, managing to convene twice: the first time on October 12th (summary & logs), and later on the 26th (logs). As mentioned in previous reports, due to the unprecedented events throughout 2020, there will be no in-person summit event this year. On our mailing list this month El as Alejandro posted a request for help with a local configuration

Software development This month, we tried to fix a large number of currently-unreproducible packages, including: Bernhard M. Wiedemann also reported three issues against bison, ibus and postgresql12.

Tools diffoscope is our in-depth and content-aware diff utility. Not only could you locate and diagnose reproducibility issues, it provides human-readable diffs of all kinds too. This month, Chris Lamb uploaded version 161 to Debian (later backported by Mattia Rizzolo), as well as made the following changes:
  • Move test_ocaml to the assert_diff helper. [ ]
  • Update tests to support OCaml version 4.11.1. Thanks to Sebastian Ramacher for the report. (#972518)
  • Bump minimum version of the Black source code formatter to 20.8b1. (#972518)
In addition, Jean-Romain Garnier temporarily updated the dependency on radare2 to ensure our test pipelines continue to work [ ], and for the GNU Guix distribution Vagrant Cascadian diffoscope to version 161 [ ]. In related development, trydiffoscope is the web-based version of diffoscope. This month, Chris Lamb made the following changes:
  • Mark a --help-only test as being a superficial test. (#971506)
  • Add a real, albeit flaky, test that interacts with the try.diffoscope.org service. [ ]
  • Bump debhelper compatibility level to 13 [ ] and bump Standards-Version to 4.5.0 [ ].
Lastly, disorderfs version 0.5.10-2 was uploaded to Debian unstable by Holger Levsen, which enabled security hardening via DEB_BUILD_MAINT_OPTIONS [ ] and dropped debian/disorderfs.lintian-overrides [ ].

Website and documentation This month, a number of updates to the main Reproducible Builds website and related documentation were made by Chris Lamb:
  • Add a citation link to the academic article regarding dettrace [ ], and added yet another supply-chain security attack publication [ ].
  • Reformatted the Jekyll s Liquid templating language and CSS formatting to be consistent [ ] as well as expand a number of tab characters [ ].
  • Used relative_url to fix missing translation icon on various pages. [ ]
  • Published two announcement blog posts regarding the restarting of our IRC meetings. [ ][ ]
  • Added an explicit note regarding the lack of an in-person summit in 2020 to our events page. [ ]

Testing framework The Reproducible Builds project operates a Jenkins-based testing framework that powers tests.reproducible-builds.org. This month, Holger Levsen made the following changes:
  • Debian-related changes:
    • Refactor and improve the Debian dashboard. [ ][ ][ ]
    • Track bugs which are usertagged as filesystem , fixfilepath , etc.. [ ][ ][ ]
    • Make a number of changes to package index pages. [ ][ ][ ]
  • System health checks:
    • Relax disk space warning levels. [ ]
    • Specifically detect build failures reported by dpkg-buildpackage. [ ]
    • Fix a regular expression to detect outdated package sets. [ ]
    • Detect Lintian issues in diffoscope. [ ]
  • Misc:
    • Make a number of updates to reflect that our sponsor Profitbricks has renamed itself to IONOS. [ ][ ][ ][ ]
    • Run a F-Droid maintenance routine twice a month to utilise its cleanup features. [ ]
    • Fix the target name in OpenWrt builds to ath79 from ath97. [ ]
    • Add a missing Postfix configuration for a node. [ ]
    • Temporarily disable Arch Linux builds until a core node is back. [ ]
    • Make a number of changes to our thanks page. [ ][ ][ ]
Build node maintenance was performed by both Holger Levsen [ ][ ] and Vagrant Cascadian [ ][ ][ ], Vagrant Cascadian also updated the page listing the variations made when testing to reflect changes for in build paths [ ] and Hans-Christoph Steiner made a number of changes for F-Droid, the free software app repository for Android devices, including:
  • Do not fail reproducibility jobs when their cleanup tasks fail. [ ]
  • Skip libvirt-related sudo command if we are not actually running libvirt. [ ]
  • Use direct URLs in order to eliminate a useless HTTP redirect. [ ]

If you are interested in contributing to the Reproducible Builds project, please visit the Contribute page on our website. However, you can also get in touch with us via:

4 November 2020

Martin-&#201;ric Racine: Migrating to Predictable Network Interface Names

A couple of years ago, I moved into a new flat that comes with RJ45 sockets wired for 10 Gigabit (but currently offering 1 Gigabit) Ethernet.This also meant changing the settings on my router box for my new ISP.I took this opportunity to review my router's other settings too. I'll be blogging about these over the next few posts. Migrating to Predictable Network Interface Names Ever since Linus decided to flip the network interface enumeration order in the Linux kernel, I had been relying on udev's persistent network interface rules to maintain some semblance of consistency in the NIC naming scheme of my hosts. It has never been a totally satisfactory method, since it required manually editing the file to list the MAC addresses of all Ethernet cards and WiFi dongles likely to appear on that host to consistently use an easy-to-remember name that I could adopt for ifupdown configuration files. Enter predictable interface names. What started as a Linux kernel module project at Dell was eventually re-implemented in systemd. However, clear documentation on the naming scheme had been difficult to find and udev's persistent network interface rules gave me what I needed, so I postponed the transition for years. Relocating to a new flat and rethinking my home network to match gave me an opportunity to revisit the topic. The naming scheme is surprisingly simple and logical, once proper explanations have been found. The short version: The rest of the name specifies on which PCI bus and which slot the interface is found. On my old Dell laptop, it looks like this: An added bonus of the naming scheme is that it makes replacing hardware a breeze, since the naming scheme is bus and slot specific, not MAC address specific. No need to edit any configuration file. I saw this first-hand when I got around upgrading my router's network cards to Gigabit-capable ones to take advantage of my new home's broadband LAN. All it took was to power off the host, swap the Ethernet cards and power on the host. That's it. systemd took care of everything else. Still, migrating looked like a daunting task. Debian's wiki page gave me some answers, but didn't provide a systematic approach. I came up with the following shell script:
#!/bin/sh
lspci   grep -i -e ethernet -e network
sudo dmesg   grep -i renamed
for n in $(ls -X /sys/class/net/   grep -v lo);
do
  echo $n: && udevadm test-builtin net_id /sys/class/net/$n 2>/dev/null   grep NAME;
  sudo rgrep $n /etc
  sudo find /etc -name '*$n*'
done
This combined ideas found on the Debian wiki with a few of my own. Running the script before and after the migration ensured that I hadn't missed any configuration file. Once I was satisfied with that, I commented out the old udev persistent network interface rules, ran dpkg-reconfigure on all my Linux kernel images to purge the rules from the initrd images, and called it a day. ... well, not quite. It turns out that with bridge-utils, bridge_ports all no longer works. One must manually list all interfaces to be bridged. Debian bug report filed. PS: Luca Capello pointed out that Debian 10/Buster's Release Notes include migration instructions.

5 October 2020

Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in September 2020

Welcome to the September 2020 report from the Reproducible Builds project. In our monthly reports, we attempt to summarise the things that we have been up to over the past month, but if you are interested in contributing to the project, please visit our main website. This month, the Reproducible Builds project was pleased to announce a donation from Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) in support of its goals. ARDC s contribution will propel the Reproducible Builds project s efforts in ensuring the future health, security and sustainability of our increasingly digital society. Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) is a non-profit which was formed to further research and experimentation with digital communications using radio, with a goal of advancing the state of the art of amateur radio and to educate radio operators in these techniques. You can view the full announcement as well as more information about ARDC on their website.
In August s report, we announced that Jennifer Helsby (redshiftzero) launched a new reproduciblewheels.com website to address the lack of reproducibility of Python wheels . This month, Kushal Das posted a brief follow-up to provide an update on reproducible sources as well. The Threema privacy and security-oriented messaging application announced that within the next months , their apps will become fully open source, supporting reproducible builds :
This is to say that anyone will be able to independently review Threema s security and verify that the published source code corresponds to the downloaded app.
You can view the full announcement on Threema s website.

Events Sadly, due to the unprecedented events in 2020, there will be no in-person Reproducible Builds event this year. However, the Reproducible Builds project intends to resume meeting regularly on IRC, starting on Monday, October 12th at 18:00 UTC (full announcement). The cadence of these meetings will probably be every two weeks, although this will be discussed and decided on at the first meeting. (An editable agenda is available.) On 18th September, Bernhard M. Wiedemann gave a presentation in German titled Wie reproducible builds Software sicherer machen ( How reproducible builds make software more secure ) at the Internet Security Digital Days 2020 conference. (View video.) On Saturday 10th October, Morten Linderud will give a talk at Arch Conf Online 2020 on The State of Reproducible Builds in the Arch Linux distribution:
The previous year has seen great progress in Arch Linux to get reproducible builds in the hands of the users and developers. In this talk we will explore the current tooling that allows users to reproduce packages, the rebuilder software that has been written to check packages and the current issues in this space.
During the Reproducible Builds summit in Marrakesh, GNU Guix, NixOS and Debian were able to produce a bit-for-bit identical binary when building GNU Mes, despite using three different major versions of GCC. Since the summit, additional work resulted in a bit-for-bit identical Mes binary using tcc and this month, a fuller update was posted by the individuals involved.

Development work In openSUSE, Bernhard M. Wiedemann published his monthly Reproducible Builds status update.

Debian Chris Lamb uploaded a number of Debian packages to address reproducibility issues that he had previously provided patches for, including cfingerd (#831021), grap (#870573), splint (#924003) & schroot (#902804) Last month, an issue was identified where a large number of Debian .buildinfo build certificates had been tainted on the official Debian build servers, as these environments had files underneath the /usr/local/sbin directory to prevent the execution of system services during package builds. However, this month, Aurelien Jarno and Wouter Verhelst fixed this issue in varying ways, resulting in a special policy-rcd-declarative-deny-all package. Building on Chris Lamb s previous work on reproducible builds for Debian .ISO images, Roland Clobus announced his work in progress on making the Debian Live images reproducible. [ ] Lucas Nussbaum performed an archive-wide rebuild of packages to test enabling the reproducible=+fixfilepath Debian build flag by default. Enabling the fixfilepath feature will likely fix reproducibility issues in an estimated 500-700 packages. The test revealed only 33 packages (out of 30,000 in the archive) that fail to build with fixfilepath. Many of those will be fixed when the default LLVM/Clang version is upgraded. 79 reviews of Debian packages were added, 23 were updated and 17 were removed this month adding to our knowledge about identified issues. Chris Lamb added and categorised a number of new issue types, including packages that captures their build path via quicktest.h and absolute build directories in documentation generated by Doxygen , etc. Lastly, Lukas Puehringer s uploaded a new version of the in-toto to Debian which was sponsored by Holger Levsen. [ ]

diffoscope diffoscope is our in-depth and content-aware diff utility that can not only locate and diagnose reproducibility issues, it provides human-readable diffs of all kinds too. In September, Chris Lamb made the following changes to diffoscope, including preparing and uploading versions 159 and 160 to Debian:
  • New features:
    • Show ordering differences only in strings(1) output by applying the ordering check to all differences across the codebase. [ ]
  • Bug fixes:
    • Mark some PGP tests that they require pgpdump, and check that the associated binary is actually installed before attempting to run it. (#969753)
    • Don t raise exceptions when cleaning up after guestfs cleanup failure. [ ]
    • Ensure we check FALLBACK_FILE_EXTENSION_SUFFIX, otherwise we run pgpdump against all files that are recognised by file(1) as data. [ ]
  • Codebase improvements:
    • Add some documentation for the EXTERNAL_TOOLS dictionary. [ ]
    • Abstract out a variable we use a couple of times. [ ]
  • diffoscope.org website improvements:
    • Make the (long) demonstration GIF less prominent on the page. [ ]
In addition, Paul Spooren added support for automatically deploying Docker images. [ ]

Website and documentation This month, a number of updates to the main Reproducible Builds website and related documentation. Chris Lamb made the following changes: In addition, Holger Levsen re-added the documentation link to the top-level navigation [ ] and documented that the jekyll-polyglot package is required [ ]. Lastly, diffoscope.org and reproducible-builds.org were transferred to Software Freedom Conservancy. Many thanks to Brett Smith from Conservancy, J r my Bobbio (lunar) and Holger Levsen for their help with transferring and to Mattia Rizzolo for initiating this.

Upstream patches The Reproducible Builds project detects, dissects and attempts to fix as many currently-unreproducible packages as possible. We endeavour to send all of our patches upstream where appropriate. This month, we wrote a large number of these patches, including: Bernhard M. Wiedemann also reported issues in git2-rs, pyftpdlib, python-nbclient, python-pyzmq & python-sidpy.

Testing framework The Reproducible Builds project operates a Jenkins-based testing framework to power tests.reproducible-builds.org. This month, Holger Levsen made the following changes:
  • Debian:
    • Shorten the subject of nodes have gone offline notification emails. [ ]
    • Also track bugs that have been usertagged with usrmerge. [ ]
    • Drop abort-related codepaths as that functionality has been removed from Jenkins. [ ]
    • Update the frequency we update base images and status pages. [ ][ ][ ][ ]
  • Status summary view page:
    • Add support for monitoring systemctl status [ ] and the number of diffoscope processes [ ].
    • Show the total number of nodes [ ] and colourise critical disk space situations [ ].
    • Improve the visuals with respect to vertical space. [ ][ ]
  • Debian rebuilder prototype:
    • Resume building random packages again [ ] and update the frequency that packages are rebuilt. [ ][ ]
    • Use --no-respect-build-path parameter until sbuild 0.81 is available. [ ]
    • Treat the inability to locate some packages as a debrebuild problem, and not as a issue with the rebuilder itself. [ ]
  • Arch Linux:
    • Update various components to be compatible with Arch Linux s move to the xz compression format. [ ][ ][ ]
    • Allow scheduling of old packages to catch up on the backlog. [ ][ ][ ]
    • Improve formatting on the summary page. [ ][ ]
    • Update HTML pages once every hour, not every 30 minutes. [ ]
    • Use the Ubuntu (!) GPG keyserver to validate packages. [ ]
  • System health checks:
    • Highlight important bad conditions in colour. [ ][ ]
    • Add support for detecting more problems, including Jenkins shutdown issues [ ], failure to upgrade Arch Linux packages [ ], kernels with wrong permissions [ ], etc.
  • Misc:
    • Delete old schroot sessions after 2 days, not 3. [ ]
    • Use sudo to cleanup diffoscope schroot sessions. [ ]
In addition, stefan0xC fixed a query for unknown results in the handling of Arch Linux packages [ ] and Mattia Rizzolo updated the template that notifies maintainers by email of their newly-unreproducible packages to ensure that it did not get caught in junk/spam folders [ ]. Finally, build node maintenance was performed by Holger Levsen [ ][ ][ ][ ], Mattia Rizzolo [ ][ ] and Vagrant Cascadian [ ][ ][ ].
If you are interested in contributing to the Reproducible Builds project, please visit our Contribute page on our website. However, you can get in touch with us via:

2 June 2020

Sylvestre Ledru: Debian rebuild with clang 10 + some patches

Because of the lock-down in France and thanks to Lucas, I have been able to make some progress rebuilding Debian with clang instead of gcc.

TLDR Instead of patching clang itself, I used a different approach this time: patching Debian tools or implementing some workaround to mitigate an issue.
The percentage of packages failing drop from 4.5% to 3.6% (1400 packages to 1110 - on a total of 31014). I focused on two classes of issues:

Qmake As I have no intention to merge the patch upstream, I used a very dirty workaround. I overwrote the g++ qmake file by clang's:
https://salsa.debian.org/lucas/collab-qa-tools/-/blob/master/modes/clang10#L44-47 I dropped the number of this failure to 0, making some packages build flawlessly (example: qtcreator, chessx, fwbuilder, etc). However, some packages are still failing later and therefore increasing the number of failures in some other categories like link error. For example, qtads fails because of ordered comparison between pointer and zero or oscar fails on a -Werror,-Wdeprecated-copy error. Breaking the build later also highlighted some new classes of issues which didn't occur with clang < 10.
For example, warnings related to C++ range loop or implicit int float conversion (I fixed a bunch of them in Firefox) .

Symbol differences Historically, symbol management for C++ in Debian has been a pain. Russ Allbery wrote a blog post in 2012 explaining the situation. AFAIK, it hasn't changed much.
Once more, I took the dirty approach: if there new or missing symbols, don't fail the build.
The rational is the following: Packages in the Debian archive are supposed to build without any issue. If there is new or missing symbols, it is probably clang generating a different library but this library is very likely working as expected (and usable by a program compiled with g++ or clang). It is purely a different approach taken by the compiler developer. In order to mitigate this issue, before the build starts, I am modifying dpkg-gensymbols to transform the error into a warning.
So, the typical Debian error some new symbols appeared in the symbols file or some symbols or patterns disappeared in the symbols file will NOT fail the build. Unsurprisingly, all but one package (libktorrent) build. Even if I am pessimistic, I reported a bug on dpkg-dev to evaluate if we could improve dpkg-gensymbol not to fail on these cases.

Next steps The next offender is Imake.tmpl:2243:10: fatal error: ' X11 .rules' file not found with more than an hundred occurrences, reported upstream quite sometime ago. Then, the big issues are going to be much harder to fix as they are real issues/warnings (with -Werror) in the code of the packages. Example: -Wc++11-narrowing & Wreserved-user-defined-literal... The list is long.
I will probably work on that when llvm/clang 11 are in RC phase.

For maintainers & upstream Maintainer of Debian/Ubuntu packages? I am providing a list of failing packages per maintainer: https://clang.debian.net/maintainers.php
For upstream, it is also easy to test with clang. Usually, apt install clang && CC=clang CXX=clang++ <build step> is good enough.

Conclusion With these two changes, I have been able to fix about 290 packages. I think I will be able to get that down a bit more but we will soon reach a plateau as many warnings/issues will have to fix in the C/C++ code itself.

16 May 2020

Lucas Kanashiro: Quarantine times

After quite some time without publishing anything here, I decided to share the latest events. It is a hard time for most of us but with all this time at home, one can also do great things. I would like to start with the wonderful idea the Debian Brasil community had! Why not create an online Debian related conference to keep people s minds busy and also share knowledge? After brainstorming, we came up with our online conference called #FiqueEmCasaUseDebian (in English it would be #StayHomeUseDebian). It started on May 3rd and will last until May 30th (yes, one month)! Every weekday, we have one online talk at night and on every Saturday, a Debian packaging workshop. The feedback so far has been awesome and the Brazilian Debian community is reaching out to more people than usual at our regular conferences (as you might have imagined, Brazil is huge and it is hard to bring people at the same place). At the end of the month, we will have the first MiniDebConf online and I hope it will be as successful as our experience here in Brazil. Another thing that deserves a highlight is the fact that I became an Ubuntu Core Developer this month; yay! After 9 months of working almost daily on the Ubuntu Server, I was able to get my upload rights to the Ubuntu archive. I was tired of asking for sponsorship, and probably my peers were tired of me too. I could spend more time here complaining about the Brazilian government but I think it isn t worth it. Let s try to do something useful instead!

30 March 2020

Shirish Agarwal: Covid 19 and the Indian response.

There have been lot of stories about Coronavirus and with it a lot of political blame-game has been happening. The first step that India took of a lockdown is and was a good step but without having a plan as to how especially the poor and the needy and especially the huge migrant population that India has (internal migration) be affected by it. A 2019 World Economic Forum shares the stats. as 139 million people. That is a huge amount of people and there are a variety of both push and pull factors which has displaced these huge number of people. While there have been attempts in the past and probably will continue in future they will be hampered unless we have trust-worthy data which is where there is lots that need to be done. In the recent few years, both the primary and secondary data has generated lot of controversies within India as well as abroad so no point in rehashing all of that. Even the definition of who is a migrant needs to be well-established just as who is a farmer . The simplest lucanae in the later is those who have land are known as farmers but the tenant farmers and their wives are not added as farmers hence the true numbers are never known. Is this an India-specific problem or similar definition issues are there in the rest of the world I don t know.

How our Policies fail to reach the poor and the vulnerable The sad part is most policies in India are made in castles in the air . An interview by the wire shares the conundrum of those who are affected and the policies which are enacted for them (it s a youtube video, sorry)
If one with an open and fresh mind sees the interview it is clear that why there was a huge reverse migration from Indian cities to villages. The poor and marginalized has always seen the Indian state as an extortive force so it doesn t make sense for them to be in the cities. The Prime Minister s annoucement of food for 3 months was a clear indication for the migrant population that for 3 months they will have no work. Faced with such a scenario, the best option for them was to return to their native places. While videos of huge number of migrants were shown of Delhi, this was the scenario of most states and cities, including Pune, my own city . Another interesting point which was made is most of the policies will need the migrants to be back in the villages. Most of these are tied to the accounts which are opened in villages, so even if they want to have the benefits they will have to migrate to villages in order to use them. Of course, everybody in India knows how leaky the administration is. The late Shri Rajiv Gandhi had famously and infamously remarked once how leaky the Public Distribution system and such systems are. It s only 10 paise out of rupee which reaches the poor. And he said this about 30 years ago. There have been numerous reports of both IPS (Indian Police Services) reforms and IAS (Indian Administrative Services) reforms over the years, many of the committee reports have been in public domain and in fact was part of the election manifesto of the ruling party in 2014 but no movement has happened on that part. The only thing which has happened is people from the ruling party have been appointed on various posts which is same as earlier governments. I was discussing with a friend who is a contractor and builder about the construction labour issues which were pointed in the report and if it is true that many a times the migrant labour is not counted. While he shared a number of cases where he knew, a more recent case in public memory was when some labourers died while building Amanora mall which is perhaps one of largest malls in India. There were few accidents while constructing the mall. Apparently, the insurance money which should have gone to the migrant laborer was taken by somebody close to the developers who were building the mall. I have a friend in who lives in Jharkhand who is a labour officer. She has shared with me so many stories of how the labourers are exploited. Keep in mind she has been a labor officer appointed by the state and her salary is paid by the state. So she always has to maintain a balance of ensuring worker s rights and the interests of the state, private entities etc. which are usually in cahoots with the state and it is possible that lot of times the State wins over the worker s rights. Again, as a labour officer, she doesn t have that much power and when she was new to the work, she was often frustrated but as she remarked few months back, she has started taking it easy (routinized) as anyways it wasn t helping her in any good way. Also there have been plenty of cases of labor officers being murdered so its easier to understand why one tries to retain some sanity while doing their job.

The Indian response and the World Response The Indian response has been the lockdown and very limited testing. We seem to be following the pattern of UK and U.S. which had been slow to respond and slow to testing. In the past Kerala showed the way but this time even that is not enough. At the end of the day we need to test, test and test just as shared by the WHO chairman. India is trying to create its own cheap test kits with ICMR approval, for e.g. a firm from my own city Pune MyLab has been given approval. We will know how good or bad they are only after they have been field-tested. For ventilators we have asked Mahindra and Mahindra even though there are companies like Allied Medical and others who have exported to EU and others which the Govt. is still taking time to think through. This is similar to how in UK some companies who are with the Govt. but who have no experience in making ventilators are been given orders while those who have experience and were exporting to Germany and other countries are not been given orders. The playbook is errily similar. In India, we don t have the infrastructure for any new patients, period. Heck only a couple of states have done something proper for the anganwadi workers. In fact, last year there were massive strikes by anganwadi workers all over India but only NDTV showed a bit of it along with some of the news channels from South India. Most mainstream channels chose to ignore it. On the world stage, some of the other countries and how they have responded perhaps need sharing. For e.g. I didn t know that Cuba had so many doctors and the politics between it and Brazil. Or the interesting stats. shared by Andreas Backhaus which seems to show how distributed the issue (age-wise) is rather than just a few groups as has been told in Indian media. What was surprising for me is the 20-29 age group which has not been shared so much in the Indian media which is the bulk of our population. The HBR article also makes a few key points which I hope both the general public and policymakers both in India as well as elsewhere take note of. What is worrying though that people can be infected twice or more as seems to be from Singapore or China and elsewhere. I have read enough of Robin Cook and Michael Crichton books to be aware that viruses can do whatever. They will over time mutate, how things will happen then is anybody s guess. What I found interesting is the world economic forum article which hypothesis that it may be two viruses which got together as well as research paper from journal from poteome research which has recently been published. The biggest myth flying around is that summer will halt or kill the spread which even some of my friends have been victim of . While a part of me wants to believe them, a simple scientific fact has been viruses have probably been around us and evolved over time, just like we have. In fact, there have been cases of people dying due to common cold and other things. Viruses are so prevalent it s unbelivable. What is and was interesting to note is that bat-borne viruses as well as pangolin viruses had been theorized and shared by Chinese researchers going all the way back to 90 s . The problem is even if we killed all the bats in the world, some other virus will take its place for sure. One of the ideas I had, dunno if it s feasible or not that at least in places like Airports, we should have some sort of screenings and a labs working on virology. Of course, this will mean more expenses for flying passengers but for public health and safety maybe it would worth doing so. In any case, virologists should have a field day cataloging various viruses and would make it harder for viruses to spread as fast as this one has. The virus spread also showed a lack of leadership in most of our leaders who didn t react fast enough. While one hopes people do learn from this, I am afraid the whole thing is far from over. These are unprecedented times and hope that all are maintaining social distancing and going out only when needed.

22 March 2020

Sylvestre Ledru: Some clang rebuild results (8.0.1, 9.0.1 & 10rc2)

As part of the LLVM release cycle, I am continuing rebuilding the Debian archive with clang instead of gcc to evaluate potential regressions. Processed results are available on the website: https://clang.debian.net/status.php - Now includes some fancy graphs to show the evolution
Raw logs are published on github: https://github.com/opencollab/clang.debian.net/tree/master/logs Since my last blog post on the subject (August 2017), Clang is more and more present in the tech ecosystem. It is now the compiler used to build Firefox and Chrome upstream binaries on all the supported architectures/operating systems. More architectures are supported, it has a new linker (lld), a new hybrid IR (MLIR), a lot of checkers in clang-tidy, cross-language linking with Rust, etc.

Results
Now, about Debian results, we rebuilt using 8.0.1, 9.0.1 and 10.0rc2. Results are pretty similar to what we had with previous versions: between 4 to 5% of packages are failing when gcc is replaced by clang.
Some clang rebuild results (8.0.1, 9.0.1 &amp; 10rc2)

Even if most of the software are still using gcc as compiler, we can see that clang has a positive effect on code quality. With many different kinds of errors and warnings found clang over the years, we noticed a steady decline of the number of errors. For example, the number of incorrect C/C++ main declarations has been decreasing years after years:
Some clang rebuild results (8.0.1, 9.0.1 &amp; 10rc2)

Errors found
The biggest offender is still the qmake changes which doesn't allow the used workaround (replacing /usr/bin/gcc by /usr/bin/clang) - about 250 errors. Most of these packages would probably compile fine with clang. More on the Qt bug tracker. The workaround proposed in the bug isn't applicable for us as we use the dropped-in replacement of the
The second error is still some differences in symbol generation. Unlike gcc, it seems that clang doesn't generate some symbols (or adds some). As a bunch of Debian packages are checking the list of symbols in the library (for ABI management), the build fails on purpose. For example, with libcec, the symbol _ZN10P8PLATFORM14CConditionImplD1Ev@Base 3.1.0 isn't generated anymore. I am not expecting this to be a big deal: the generated libraries probably works most of the time. More on C++ symbol management in Debian.

Current status
As previously said in a blog post, I don't think there is a strong intensive to go away from gcc for most of the Linux distributions. The big reason for BSD was the license (even if the move to the Apache 2 license wasn't received positively by some of them).
While the LLVM/clang ecosystem clearly won the tooling battle, as a C/C++ compiler, gcc is still an excellent compiler which supports more architecture and more languages.
In term of new warnings and checks, as the clang community moved the efforts in clang-tidy (which requires more complex tooling), out of the box, gcc provides a better experience (as example, see the Firefox meta bug to build with -Werror with the default warnings using gcc 9, gcc 10 and clang trunk for example).

Next steps
I see some potential next steps to decrease the number of failure:
  • Workaround the Qt/Qmake issue
  • Fix the objective-c header include issues (echo "#include <objc/objc.h>" > foo.m && clang -c foo.m is currently failing)
  • Identify why clang generates more/less symbols that gcc in the library and try to fix that
  • Rebuild the archive with clang-7 - Seems that I have some data problem

Many thanks to Lucas Nussbaum for the rebuilds.

Sylvestre Ledru: Some clang rebuild results (8.0.1, 9.0.1 & 10rc2)

As part of the LLVM release cycle, I am continuing rebuilding the Debian archive with clang instead of gcc to evaluate potential regressions. Processed results are available on the website: https://clang.debian.net/status.php - Now includes some fancy graphs to show the evolution
Raw logs are published on github: https://github.com/opencollab/clang.debian.net/tree/master/logs Since my last blog post on the subject (August 2017), Clang is more and more present in the tech ecosystem. It is now the compiler used to build Firefox and Chrome upstream binaries on all the supported architectures/operating systems. More architectures are supported, it has a new linker (lld), a new hybrid IR (MLIR), a lot of checkers in clang-tidy, cross-language linking with Rust, etc.

Results
Now, about Debian results, we rebuilt using 8.0.1, 9.0.1 and 10.0rc2. Results are pretty similar to what we had with previous versions: between 4 to 5% of packages are failing when gcc is replaced by clang.
Some clang rebuild results (8.0.1, 9.0.1 &amp; 10rc2)

Even if most of the software are still using gcc as compiler, we can see that clang has a positive effect on code quality. With many different kinds of errors and warnings found clang over the years, we noticed a steady decline of the number of errors. For example, the number of incorrect C/C++ main declarations has been decreasing years after years:
Some clang rebuild results (8.0.1, 9.0.1 &amp; 10rc2)

Errors found
The biggest offender is still the qmake changes which doesn't allow the used workaround (replacing /usr/bin/gcc by /usr/bin/clang) - about 250 errors. Most of these packages would probably compile fine with clang. More on the Qt bug tracker. The workaround proposed in the bug isn't applicable for us as we use the dropped-in replacement of the compiler.
The second error is still some differences in symbol generation. Unlike gcc, it seems that clang doesn't generate some symbols (or adds some). As a bunch of Debian packages are checking the list of symbols in the library (for ABI management), the build fails on purpose. For example, with libcec, the symbol _ZN10P8PLATFORM14CConditionImplD1Ev@Base 3.1.0 isn't generated anymore. I am not expecting this to be a big deal: the generated libraries probably works most of the time. More on C++ symbol management in Debian.
I reported this bug upstream a while back: https://bugs.llvm.org/show_bug.cgi?id=30441

Current status
As previously said in a blog post, I don't think there is a strong intensive to go away from gcc for most of the Linux distributions. The big reason for BSD was the license (even if the move to the Apache 2 license wasn't received positively by some of them).
While the LLVM/clang ecosystem clearly won the tooling battle, as a C/C++ compiler, gcc is still an excellent compiler which supports more architecture and more languages.
In term of new warnings and checks, as the clang community moved the efforts in clang-tidy (which requires more complex tooling), out of the box, gcc provides a better experience (as example, see the Firefox meta bug to build with -Werror with the default warnings using gcc 9, gcc 10 and clang trunk for example).

Next steps
I see some potential next steps to decrease the number of failure:
  • Workaround the Qt/Qmake issue
  • Fix the objective-c header include issues (echo "#include <objc/objc.h>" > foo.m && clang -c foo.m is currently failing)
  • Identify why clang generates more/less symbols that gcc in the library and try to fix that
  • Rebuild the archive with clang-7 - Seems that I have some data problem

Many thanks to Lucas Nussbaum for the rebuilds.

17 November 2017

Rapha&#235;l Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, October 2017

A Debian LTS logoLike each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS. Individual reports In October, about 197 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available: Evolution of the situation The number of sponsored hours increased slightly to 183 hours per month. With the increasing number of security issues to deal with, and with the number of open issues not really going down, I decided to bump the funding target to what amounts to 1.5 full-time position. The security tracker currently lists 50 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file 36 (we re a bit behind in CVE triaging apparently). Thanks to our sponsors New sponsors are in bold.

No comment Liked this article? Click here. My blog is Flattr-enabled.

7 November 2017

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #132

Here's what happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday October 29 and Saturday November 4 2017: Past events Upcoming events Reproducible work in other projects Packages reviewed and fixed, and bugs filed Reviews of unreproducible packages 7 package reviews have been added, 43 have been updated and 47 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. Weekly QA work During our reproducibility testing, FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by: Documentation updates diffoscope development Version 88 was uploaded to unstable by Mattia Rizzolo. It included contributions (already covered by posts of the previous weeks) from: strip-nondeterminism development Version 0.040-1 was uploaded to unstable by Mattia Rizzolo. It included contributions already covered by posts of the previous weeks, as well as new ones from:
Version 0.5.2-2 was uploaded to unstable by Holger Levsen. It included contributions already covered by posts of the previous weeks, as well as new ones from: reprotest development buildinfo.debian.net development tests.reproducible-builds.org Misc. This week's edition was written by Bernhard M. Wiedemann, Chris Lamb, Mattia Rizzolo & reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC & the mailing lists.

Lucas Kanashiro: My Debian LTS work on October

In this post I describe the work that I ve done until the end of October in the context of the Debian LTS team. This month I was allocated 5h and spent just 2h of them because I have written my master s qualification text (I am almost on my deadline to finish it). During November I intend to finish these 3h pending, so I did not request more hours. I basically worked with CVE-2017-0903 which is an issue related to YAML deserialization of gem specifications that could allow one execute remote code. Two packages in wheezy could be affected by this security vulnerability, rubygems and ruby1.9.1. The issue affects just RubyGems source code, but before Ruby version 1.9.1 it was maintained in a separated package, after that it was incorporated by ruby interpreter source package. After carefully read the upstream blogpost and reviewed the commit that intruduced this vulnerability, I was able to figure out whether the mentioned packages were affected or not. The modification was not present in both of them, and after some tests I did confirm that those versions of rubygems were not affected. The two packages were marked as not affected by CVE-2017-0903 in wheezy. Well, this was the summary of my activities in the Debian LTS team in October. See you next month :)

2 November 2017

Bits from Debian: New Debian Developers and Maintainers (September and October 2017)

The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months: The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months: Congratulations!

31 October 2017

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities October 2017

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • Debian: respond to mail debug request, redirect hardware access seeker to guest account, redirect hardware donors to porters, redirect interview seeker to DPL, reboot system with dead service
  • Debian mentors: security updates, reboot
  • Debian wiki: upgrade search db format, remove incorrect bans, whitelist email addresses, disable accounts with bouncing email, update email for accounts with bouncing email
  • Debian website: remove need for a website rebuild
  • Openmoko: restart web server, set web server process limits, install monitoring tool

Sponsors The talloc/cmocka uploads and the remmina issue were sponsored by my employer. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

20 October 2017

Rapha&#235;l Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, September 2017

A Debian LTS logoLike each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS. Individual reports In August, about 170 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available: Evolution of the situation The number of sponsored hours is the same as last month. But we have a new sponsor in the pipe. The security tracker currently lists 52 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file 49. The number of packages with open issues decreased slightly compared to last month but we re not yet back to the usual situation. Thanks to our sponsors New sponsors are in bold.

No comment Liked this article? Click here. My blog is Flattr-enabled.

17 October 2017

Russ Allbery: Bundle haul

Confession time: I started making these posts (eons ago) because a close friend did as well, and I enjoyed reading them. But the main reason why I continue is because the primary way I have to keep track of the books I've bought and avoid duplicates is, well, grep on these posts. I should come up with a non-bullshit way of doing this, but time to do more elegant things is in short supply, and, well, it's my blog. So I'm boring all of you who read this in various places with my internal bookkeeping. I do try to at least add a bit of commentary. This one will be more tedious than most since it includes five separate Humble Bundles, which increases the volume a lot. (I just realized I'd forgotten to record those purchases from the past several months.) First, the individual books I bought directly: Ilona Andrews Sweep in Peace (sff)
Ilona Andrews One Fell Sweep (sff)
Steven Brust Vallista (sff)
Nicky Drayden The Prey of Gods (sff)
Meg Elison The Book of the Unnamed Midwife (sff)
Pat Green Night Moves (nonfiction)
Ann Leckie Provenance (sff)
Seanan McGuire Once Broken Faith (sff)
Seanan McGuire The Brightest Fell (sff)
K. Arsenault Rivera The Tiger's Daughter (sff)
Matthew Walker Why We Sleep (nonfiction)
Some new books by favorite authors, a few new releases I heard good things about, and two (Night Moves and Why We Sleep) from references in on-line articles that impressed me. The books from security bundles (this is mostly work reading, assuming I'll get to any of it), including a blockchain bundle: Wil Allsop Unauthorised Access (nonfiction)
Ross Anderson Security Engineering (nonfiction)
Chris Anley, et al. The Shellcoder's Handbook (nonfiction)
Conrad Barsky & Chris Wilmer Bitcoin for the Befuddled (nonfiction)
Imran Bashir Mastering Blockchain (nonfiction)
Richard Bejtlich The Practice of Network Security (nonfiction)
Kariappa Bheemaiah The Blockchain Alternative (nonfiction)
Violet Blue Smart Girl's Guide to Privacy (nonfiction)
Richard Caetano Learning Bitcoin (nonfiction)
Nick Cano Game Hacking (nonfiction)
Bruce Dang, et al. Practical Reverse Engineering (nonfiction)
Chris Dannen Introducing Ethereum and Solidity (nonfiction)
Daniel Drescher Blockchain Basics (nonfiction)
Chris Eagle The IDA Pro Book, 2nd Edition (nonfiction)
Nikolay Elenkov Android Security Internals (nonfiction)
Jon Erickson Hacking, 2nd Edition (nonfiction)
Pedro Franco Understanding Bitcoin (nonfiction)
Christopher Hadnagy Social Engineering (nonfiction)
Peter N.M. Hansteen The Book of PF (nonfiction)
Brian Kelly The Bitcoin Big Bang (nonfiction)
David Kennedy, et al. Metasploit (nonfiction)
Manul Laphroaig (ed.) PoC GTFO (nonfiction)
Michael Hale Ligh, et al. The Art of Memory Forensics (nonfiction)
Michael Hale Ligh, et al. Malware Analyst's Cookbook (nonfiction)
Michael W. Lucas Absolute OpenBSD, 2nd Edition (nonfiction)
Bruce Nikkel Practical Forensic Imaging (nonfiction)
Sean-Philip Oriyano CEHv9 (nonfiction)
Kevin D. Mitnick The Art of Deception (nonfiction)
Narayan Prusty Building Blockchain Projects (nonfiction)
Prypto Bitcoin for Dummies (nonfiction)
Chris Sanders Practical Packet Analysis, 3rd Edition (nonfiction)
Bruce Schneier Applied Cryptography (nonfiction)
Adam Shostack Threat Modeling (nonfiction)
Craig Smith The Car Hacker's Handbook (nonfiction)
Dafydd Stuttard & Marcus Pinto The Web Application Hacker's Handbook (nonfiction)
Albert Szmigielski Bitcoin Essentials (nonfiction)
David Thiel iOS Application Security (nonfiction)
Georgia Weidman Penetration Testing (nonfiction)
Finally, the two SF bundles: Buzz Aldrin & John Barnes Encounter with Tiber (sff)
Poul Anderson Orion Shall Rise (sff)
Greg Bear The Forge of God (sff)
Octavia E. Butler Dawn (sff)
William C. Dietz Steelheart (sff)
J.L. Doty A Choice of Treasons (sff)
Harlan Ellison The City on the Edge of Forever (sff)
Toh Enjoe Self-Reference ENGINE (sff)
David Feintuch Midshipman's Hope (sff)
Alan Dean Foster Icerigger (sff)
Alan Dean Foster Mission to Moulokin (sff)
Alan Dean Foster The Deluge Drivers (sff)
Taiyo Fujii Orbital Cloud (sff)
Hideo Furukawa Belka, Why Don't You Bark? (sff)
Haikasoru (ed.) Saiensu Fikushon 2016 (sff anthology)
Joe Haldeman All My Sins Remembered (sff)
Jyouji Hayashi The Ouroboros Wave (sff)
Sergei Lukyanenko The Genome (sff)
Chohei Kambayashi Good Luck, Yukikaze (sff)
Chohei Kambayashi Yukikaze (sff)
Sakyo Komatsu Virus (sff)
Miyuki Miyabe The Book of Heroes (sff)
Kazuki Sakuraba Red Girls (sff)
Robert Silverberg Across a Billion Years (sff)
Allen Steele Orbital Decay (sff)
Bruce Sterling Schismatrix Plus (sff)
Michael Swanwick Vacuum Flowers (sff)
Yoshiki Tanaka Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Volume 1: Dawn (sff)
Yoshiki Tanaka Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Volume 2: Ambition (sff)
Yoshiki Tanaka Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Volume 3: Endurance (sff)
Tow Ubukata Mardock Scramble (sff)
Sayuri Ueda The Cage of Zeus (sff)
Sean Williams & Shane Dix Echoes of Earth (sff)
Hiroshi Yamamoto MM9 (sff)
Timothy Zahn Blackcollar (sff)
Phew. Okay, all caught up, and hopefully won't have to dump something like this again in the near future. Also, more books than I have any actual time to read, but what else is new.

1 October 2017

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities September 2017

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • icns: merged patches
  • Debian: help guest user with access, investigate/escalate broken network, restart broken stunnels, investigate static.d.o storage, investigate weird RAID mails, ask hoster to investigate power issue,
  • Debian mentors: lintian/security updates & reboot
  • Debian wiki: merged & deployed patch, redirect DDTSS translator, redirect user support requests, whitelist email addresses, update email for accounts with bouncing email,
  • Debian derivatives census: merged/deployed patches
  • Debian PTS: debugged cron mails, deployed changes, reran scripts, fixed configuration file
  • Openmoko: debug reboot issue, debug load issues

Communication

Sponsors The samba bug was sponsored by my employer. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

Next.