Search Results: "kirk"

20 June 2021

Russ Allbery: Review: The Magician's Nephew

Review: The Magician's Nephew, by C.S. Lewis
Illustrator: Pauline Baynes
Series: Chronicles of Narnia #6
Publisher: Collier Books
Copyright: 1955
Printing: 1978
ISBN: 0-02-044230-0
Format: Mass market
Pages: 186
The Magician's Nephew is the sixth book of the Chronicles of Narnia in the original publication order, but it's a prequel, set fifty years before The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. It's therefore put first in the new reading order. I have always loved world-building and continuities and, as a comics book reader (Marvel primarily), developed a deep enjoyment of filling in the pieces and reconstructing histories from later stories. It's no wonder that I love reading The Magician's Nephew after The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. The experience of fleshing out backstory with detail and specifics makes me happy. If that's also you, I recommend the order in which I'm reading these books. Reading this one first is defensible, though. One of the strongest arguments for doing so is that it's a much stronger, tighter, and better-told story than The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, and therefore might start the series off on a better foot for you. It stands alone well; you don't need to know any of the later events to enjoy this, although you will miss the significance of a few things like the lamp post and you don't get the full introduction to Aslan. The Magician's Nephew is the story of Polly Plummer, her new neighbor Digory Kirke, and his Uncle Andrew, who fancies himself a magician. At the start of the book, Digory's mother is bed-ridden and dying and Digory is miserable, which is the impetus for a friendship with Polly. The two decide to explore the crawl space of the row houses in which they live, seeing if they can get into the empty house past Digory's. They don't calculate the distances correctly and end up in Uncle Andrew's workroom, where Digory was forbidden to go. Uncle Andrew sees this as a golden opportunity to use them for an experiment in travel to other worlds. MAJOR SPOILERS BELOW. The Magician's Nephew, like the best of the Narnia books, does not drag its feet getting started. It takes a mere 30 pages to introduce all of the characters, establish a friendship, introduce us to a villain, and get both of the kids into another world. When Lewis is at his best, he has an economy of storytelling and a grasp of pacing that I wish was more common. It's also stuffed to the brim with ideas, one of the best of which is the Wood Between the Worlds. Uncle Andrew has crafted pairs of magic rings, yellow and green, and tricks Polly into touching one of the yellow ones, causing her to vanish from our world. He then uses her plight to coerce Digory into going after her, carrying two green rings that he thinks will bring people back into our world, and not incidentally also observing that world and returning to tell Uncle Andrew what it's like. But the world is more complicated than he thinks it is, and the place where the children find themselves is an eerie and incredibly peaceful wood, full of grass and trees but apparently no other living thing, and sprinkled with pools of water. This was my first encounter with the idea of a world that connects other worlds, and it remains the most memorable one for me. I love everything about the Wood: the simplicity of it, the calm that seems in part to be a defense against intrusion, the hidden danger that one might lose one's way and confuse the ponds for each other, and even the way that it tends to make one lose track of why one is there or what one is trying to accomplish. That quiet forest filled with pools is still an image I use for infinite creativity and potential. It's quiet and nonthreatening, but not entirely inviting either; it's magnificently neutral, letting each person bring what they wish to it. One of the minor plot points of this book is that Uncle Andrew is wrong about the rings because he's wrong about the worlds. There aren't just two worlds; there are an infinite number, with the Wood as a nexus, and our reality is neither the center nor one of an important pair. The rings are directional, but relative to the Wood, not our world. The kids, who are forced to experiment and who have open minds, figure this out quickly, but Uncle Andrew never shifts his perspective. This isn't important to the story, but I've always thought it was a nice touch of world-building. Where this story is heading, of course, is the creation of Narnia and the beginning of all of the stories told in the rest of the series. But before that, the kids's first trip out of the Wood is to one of the best worlds of children's fantasy: Charn. If the Wood is my mental image of a world nexus, Charn will forever be my image of a dying world: black sky, swollen red sun, and endless abandoned and crumbling buildings as far as the eye can see, full of tired silences and eerie noises. And, of course, the hall of statues, with one of the most memorable descriptions of history and empire I've ever read (if you ignore the racialized description):
All of the faces they could see were certainly nice. Both the men and women looked kind and wise, and they seemed to come of a handsome race. But after the children had gone a few steps down the room they came to faces that looked a little different. These were very solemn faces. You felt you would have to mind your P's and Q's, if you ever met living people who looked like that. When they had gone a little farther, they found themselves among faces they didn't like: this was about the middle of the room. The faces here looked very strong and proud and happy, but they looked cruel. A little further on, they looked crueller. Further on again, they were still cruel but they no longer looked happy. They were even despairing faces: as if the people they belonged to had done dreadful things and also suffered dreadful things.
The last statue is of a fierce, proud woman that Digory finds strikingly beautiful. (Lewis notes in an aside that Polly always said she never found anything specially beautiful about her. Here, as in The Silver Chair, the girl is the sensible one and things would have gone better if the boy had listened to her, a theme that I find immensely frustrating because Susan was the sensible one in the first two books of the series but then Lewis threw that away.) There is a bell in the middle of this hall, and the pillar that holds that bell has an inscription on it that I think every kid who grew up on Narnia knows by heart.
Make your choice, adventurous Stranger;
Strike the bell and bide the danger,
Or wonder, till it drives you mad,
What would have followed if you had.
Polly has no intention of striking the bell, but Digory fights her and does it anyway, waking Jadis from where she sat as the final statue in the hall and setting off one of the greatest reimaginings of a villain in children's literature. Jadis will, of course, become the White Witch who holds Narnia in endless winter some thousand Narnian years later. But the White Witch was a mediocre villain at best, the sort of obvious and cruel villain common in short fairy tales where the author isn't interested in doing much characterization. She exists to be evil, do bad things, and be defeated. She has a few good moments in conflict with Aslan, but that's about it. Jadis in this book is another matter entirely: proud, brilliant, dangerous, and creative. The death of everything on Charn was Jadis's doing: an intentional spell, used to claim a victory of sorts from the jaws of defeat by her sister in a civil war. (I find it fascinating that Lewis puts aside his normally sexist roles here.) Despite the best attempts of the kids to lose her both in Charn and in the Wood (which is inimical to her, in another nice bit of world-building), she manages to get back to England with them. The result is a remarkably good bit of villain characterization. Jadis is totally out of her element, used to a world-spanning empire run with magic and (from what hints we get) vaguely medieval technology. Her plan to take over their local country and eventually the world should be absurd and is played somewhat for laughs. Her magic, which is her great weapon, doesn't even work in England. But Jadis learns at a speed that the reader can watch. She's observant, she pays attention to things that don't fit her expectations, she changes plans, and she moves with predatory speed. Within a few hours in London she's stolen jewels and a horse and carriage, and the local police seem entirely overmatched. There's no way that one person without magic should be a real danger to England around the turn of the 20th century, but by the time the kids manage to pull her back into the Wood, you're not entirely sure England would have been safe. A chaotic confrontation, plus the ability of the rings to work their magic through transitive human contact, ends up with the kids, Uncle Andrew, Jadis, a taxicab driver and his horse all transported through the Wood to a new world. In this case, literally a new world: Narnia at the point of its creation. Here again, Lewis translates Christian myth, in this case the Genesis creation story, into a more vivid and in many ways more beautiful story than the original. Aslan singing the world into existence is an incredible image, as is the newly-created world so bursting with life that even things that normally could not grow will do so. (Which, of course, is why there is a lamp post burning in the middle of the western forest of Narnia for the Pevensie kids to find later.) I think my favorite part is the creation of the stars, but the whole sequence is great. There's also an insightful bit of human psychology. Uncle Andrew can't believe that a lion is singing, so he convinces himself that Aslan is not singing, and thus prevents himself from making any sense of the talking animals later.
Now the trouble about trying to make yourself stupider than you really are is that you very often succeed.
As with a lot in Lewis, he probably meant this as a statement about faith, but it generalizes well beyond the religious context. What disappointed me about the creation story, though, is the animals. I didn't notice this as a kid, but this re-read has sensitized me to how Lewis consistently treats the talking animals as less than humans even though he celebrates them. That happens here too: the newly-created, newly-awakened animals are curious and excited but kind of dim. Some of this is an attempt to show that they're young and are just starting to learn, but it also seems to be an excuse for Aslan to set up a human king and queen over them instead of teaching them directly how to deal with the threat of Jadis who the children inadvertently introduced into the world. The other thing I dislike about The Magician's Nephew is that the climax is unnecessarily cruel. Once Digory realizes the properties of the newly-created world, he hopes to find a way to use that to heal his mother. Aslan points out that he is responsible for Jadis entering the world and instead sends him on a mission to obtain a fruit that, when planted, will ward Narnia against her for many years. The same fruit would heal his mother, and he has to choose Narnia over her. (It's a fairly explicit parallel to the Garden of Eden, except in this case Digory passes.) Aslan, in the end, gives Digory the fruit of the tree that grows, which is still sufficient to heal his mother, but this sequence made me angry when re-reading it. Aslan knew all along that what Digory is doing will let him heal his mother as well, but hides this from him to make it more of a test. It's cruel and mean; Aslan could have promised to heal Digory's mother and then seen if he would help Narnia without getting anything in return other than atoning for his error, but I suppose that was too transactional for Lewis's theology or something. Meh. But, despite that, the only reason why this is not the best Narnia book is because The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is the only Narnia book that also nails the ending. The Magician's Nephew, up through Charn, Jadis's rampage through London, and the initial creation of Narnia, is fully as good, perhaps better. It sags a bit at the end, partly because it tries to hard to make the Narnian animals humorous and partly because of the unnecessary emotional torture of Digory. But this still holds up as the second-best Narnia book, and one I thoroughly enjoyed re-reading. If anything, Jadis and Charn are even better than I remembered. Followed by the last book of the series, the somewhat notorious The Last Battle. Rating: 9 out of 10

1 July 2020

Joachim Breitner: Template Haskell recompilation

I was wondering: What happens if I have a Haskell module with Template Haskell that embeds some information from the environment (time, environment variables). Will such a module be reliable recompiled? And what if it gets recompiled, but the source code produced by Template Haskell is actually unchanged (e.g., because the environment variable has not changed), will all depending modules be recompiled (which would be bad)? Here is a quick experiment, using GHC-8.8:
/tmp/th-recom-test $ cat Foo.hs
 -# LANGUAGE TemplateHaskell #- 
 -# OPTIONS_GHC -fforce-recomp #- 
module Foo where
import Language.Haskell.TH
import Language.Haskell.TH.Syntax
import System.Process
theMinute :: String
theMinute = $(runIO (readProcess "date" ["+%M"] "") >>= stringE)
[jojo@kirk:2] Mi, der 01.07.2020 um 17:18 Uhr  
/tmp/th-recom-test $ cat Main.hs
import Foo
main = putStrLn theMinute
Note that I had to set -# OPTIONS_GHC -fforce-recomp #- by default, GHC will not recompile a module, even if it uses Template Haskell and runIO. If you are reading from a file you can use addDependentFile to tell the compiler about that depenency, but that does not help with reading from the environment. So here is the test, and we get the desired behaviour: The Foo module is recompiled every time, but unless the minute has changed (see my prompt), Main is not recomipled:
/tmp/th-recom-test $ ghc --make -O2 Main.hs -o test
[1 of 2] Compiling Foo              ( Foo.hs, Foo.o )
[2 of 2] Compiling Main             ( Main.hs, Main.o )
Linking test ...
[jojo@kirk:2] Mi, der 01.07.2020 um 17:20 Uhr  
/tmp/th-recom-test $ ghc --make -O2 Main.hs -o test
[1 of 2] Compiling Foo              ( Foo.hs, Foo.o )
Linking test ...
[jojo@kirk:2] Mi, der 01.07.2020 um 17:20 Uhr  
/tmp/th-recom-test $ ghc --make -O2 Main.hs -o test
[1 of 2] Compiling Foo              ( Foo.hs, Foo.o )
[2 of 2] Compiling Main             ( Main.hs, Main.o ) [Foo changed]
Linking test ...
So all well! Update: It seems that while this works with ghc --make, the -fforce-recomp does not cause cabal build to rebuild the module. That s unfortunate.

28 September 2017

Russ Allbery: Review: The Seventh Bride

Review: The Seventh Bride, by T. Kingfisher
Publisher: 47North
Copyright: 2015
ISBN: 1-5039-4975-3
Format: Kindle
Pages: 225
There are two editions of this book, although only one currently for sale. This review is of the second edition, released in November of 2015. T. Kingfisher is a pen name for Ursula Vernon when she's writing for adults. Rhea is a miller's daughter. She's fifteen, obedient, wary of swans, respectful to her parents, and engaged to Lord Crevan. The last was a recent and entirely unexpected development. It's not that she didn't expect to get married eventually, since of course that's what one does. And it's not that Lord Crevan was a stranger, since that's often how it went with marriage for people like her. But she wasn't expecting to get married now, and it was not at all clear why Lord Crevan would want to marry her in particular. Also, something felt not right about the entire thing. And it didn't start feeling any better when she finally met Lord Crevan for the first time, some days after the proposal to her parents. The decidedly non-romantic hand kissing didn't help, nor did the smug smile. But it's not like she had any choice. The miller's daughter doesn't say no to a lord and a friend of the viscount. The miller's family certainly doesn't say no when they're having trouble paying the bills, the viscount owns the mill, and they could be turned out of their livelihood at a whim. They still can't say no when Lord Crevan orders Rhea to come to his house in the middle of the night down a road that quite certainly doesn't exist during the day, even though that's very much not the sort of thing that is normally done. Particularly before the marriage. Friends of the viscount who are also sorcerers can get away with quite a lot. But Lord Crevan will discover that there's still a limit to how far he can order Rhea around, and practical-minded miller's daughters can make a lot of unexpected friends even in dire circumstances. The Seventh Bride is another entry in T. Kingfisher's series of retold fairy tales, although the fairy tale in question is less clear than with The Raven and the Reindeer. Kirkus says it's a retelling of Bluebeard, but I still don't quite see that in the story. I think one could argue equally easily that it's an original story. Nonetheless, it is a fairy tale: it has that fairy tale mix of magical danger and practical morality, and it's about courage and friendships and their consequences. It also has a hedgehog. This is an T. Kingfisher story, so it's packed full of bits of marvelous phrasing that I want to read over and over again. It has wonderful characters, the hedgehog among them, and it has, at its heart, a sort of foundational decency and stubborn goodness that's deeply satisfying for the reader. The Seventh Bride is a lot closer to horror than the other T. Kingfisher books I've read, but it never fell into my dislike of the horror genre, despite a few gruesome bits. I think that's because neither Rhea nor the narrator treat the horrific aspects as representative of the true shape of the world. Rhea instead confronts them with a stubborn determination and an attempt to make the best of each moment, and with a practical self-awareness that I loved reading about.
The problem with crying in the woods, by the side of a white road that leads somewhere terrible, is that the reason for crying isn't inside your head. You have a perfectly legitimate and pressing reason for crying, and it will still be there in five minutes, except that your throat will be raw and your eyes will itch and absolutely nothing else will have changed.
Lord Crevan, when Rhea finally reaches him, toys with her by giving her progressively more horrible puzzle tasks, threatening her with the promised marriage if she fails at any of them. The way this part of the book finally resolves is one of the best moments I've read in any book. Kingfisher captures an aspect of moral decisions, and a way in which evil doesn't work the way that evil people expect it to work, that I can't remember seeing an author capture this well. There are a lot of things here for Rhea to untangle: the nature of Crevan's power, her unexpected allies in his manor, why he proposed marriage to her, and of course how to escape his power. The plot works, but I don't think it was the best part of the book, and it tends to happen to Rhea rather than being driven by her. But I have rarely read a book quite this confident of its moral center, or quite as justified in that confidence. I am definitely reading everything Vernon has published under the T. Kingfisher name, and quite possibly most of her children's books as well. Recommended, particularly if you liked the excerpt above. There's an entire book full of paragraphs like that waiting for you. Rating: 8 out of 10

11 April 2017

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 102 in Stretch cycle

Here's what happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday April 2 and Saturday April 8 2017: Media coverage Toolchain development and fixes Reviews of unreproducible packages 27 package reviews have been added, 14 have been updated and 17 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. Weekly QA work During our reproducibility testing, FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by: tests.reproducible-builds.org Misc. This week's edition was written by Chris Lamb, Vagrant Cascadian & reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC & the mailing lists.

22 July 2016

Russell Coker: 802.1x Authentication on Debian

I recently had to setup some Linux workstations with 802.1x authentication (described as Ethernet authentication ) to connect to a smart switch. The most useful web site I found was the Ubuntu help site about 802.1x Authentication [1]. But it didn t describe exactly what I needed so I m writing a more concise explanation. The first thing to note is that the authentication mechanism works the same way as 802.11 wireless authentication, so it s a good idea to have the wpasupplicant package installed on all laptops just in case you need to connect to such a network. The first step is to create a wpa_supplicant config file, I named mine /etc/wpa_supplicant_SITE.conf. The file needs contents like the following:
network= 
 key_mgmt=IEEE8021X
 eap=PEAP
 identity="USERNAME"
 anonymous_identity="USERNAME"
 password="PASS"
 phase1="auth=MD5"
 phase2="auth=CHAP password=PASS"
 eapol_flags=0
 
The first difference between what I use and the Ubuntu example is that I m using eap=PEAP , that is an issue of the way the network is configured, whoever runs your switch can tell you the correct settings for that. The next difference is that I m using auth=CHAP and the Ubuntu example has auth=PAP . The difference between those protocols is that CHAP has a challenge-response and PAP just has the password sent (maybe encrypted) over the network. If whoever runs the network says that they don t store unhashed passwords or makes any similar claim then they are almost certainly using CHAP. Change USERNAME and PASS to your user name and password. wpa_supplicant -c /etc/wpa_supplicant_SITE.conf -D wired -i eth0 The above command can be used to test the operation of wpa_supplicant.
Successfully initialized wpa_supplicant
eth0: Associated with 00:01:02:03:04:05
eth0: CTRL-EVENT-EAP-STARTED EAP authentication started
eth0: CTRL-EVENT-EAP-PROPOSED-METHOD vendor=0 method=25
TLS: Unsupported Phase2 EAP method 'CHAP'
eth0: CTRL-EVENT-EAP-METHOD EAP vendor 0 method 25 (PEAP) selected
eth0: CTRL-EVENT-EAP-PEER-CERT depth=0 subject=''
eth0: CTRL-EVENT-EAP-PEER-CERT depth=0 subject=''
EAP-MSCHAPV2: Authentication succeeded
EAP-TLV: TLV Result - Success - EAP-TLV/Phase2 Completed
eth0: CTRL-EVENT-EAP-SUCCESS EAP authentication completed successfully
eth0: CTRL-EVENT-CONNECTED - Connection to 00:01:02:03:04:05 completed [id=0 id_str=]
Above is the output of a successful test with wpa_supplicant. I replaced the MAC of the switch with 00:01:02:03:04:05. Strangely it doesn t like CHAP but is automatically selecting MSCHAPV2 and working, maybe anything other than PAP would do.
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet dhcp
  wpa-driver wired
  wpa-conf /etc/wpa_supplicant_SITE.conf
Above is a snippet of /etc/network/interfaces that works with this configuration.

Martin Michlmayr: Debian on Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS

The majority of NAS devices supported in Debian are based on Marvell's Kirkwood platform. This platform is quite dated now and can only run Debian's armel port. Debian now supports the Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS devices. They are based on Marvell's Armada 370, a platform which can run Debian's armhf port. Unfortunately, even the Armada 370 is a bit dated now, so I would not recommend these devices for new purchases. If you have one already, however, you now have the option to run native Debian. There are some features I like about the Seagate NAS devices: If you have a Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS, you can follow the instructions on the Debian wiki. If Seagate releases more NAS devices on Marvell's Armada platform, I intend to add Debian support.

28 February 2016

Ian Campbell: Hotswapping a failed RAID device

Recently I started getting SMART warnings from on of the disks in my home NAS (a QNAP TS-419P II armel/kirkwood device running Debian Jessie):
Device: /dev/disk/by-id/ata-ST3000DM001-1CH166_W1F2QSV6 [SAT], Self-Test Log error count increased from 0 to 1
Meaning it was now time to switch out that disk from the RAID5 array. Since everytime this happens I have to go and lookup again what to do I've decided to write it down this time. I configure SMART to talk about devices by-id (giving me their name and model number) so first I needed to figure out what the kernel was calling this device (although mdadm is happy with the by-id path, various other bits are not):
# readlink /dev/disk/by-id/ata-ST3000DM001-1CH166_W1F2QSV6 
../../sdd
Next I needed to mark the device as failed in the array:
# mdadm --detail /dev/md0 
/dev/md0:
[...]
          State : clean 
 Active Devices : 4
Working Devices : 4
 Failed Devices : 0
  Spare Devices : 0
[...]
    Number   Major   Minor   RaidDevice State
       5       8       48        0      active sync   /dev/sdd
       1       8       32        1      active sync   /dev/sdc
       6       8       16        2      active sync   /dev/sdb
       4       8        0        3      active sync   /dev/sda
# mdadm --fail /dev/md0 /dev/disk/by-id/ata-ST3000DM001-1CH166_W1F2QSV6 
mdadm: set /dev/disk/by-id/ata-ST3000DM001-1CH166_W1F2QSV6 faulty in /dev/md0
# mdadm --detail /dev/md0 
/dev/md0:
[...]
 Active Devices : 3
Working Devices : 3
 Failed Devices : 1
  Spare Devices : 0
[...]
Number   Major   Minor   RaidDevice State
   0       0        0        0      removed
   1       8       32        1      active sync   /dev/sdc
   6       8       16        2      active sync   /dev/sdb
   4       8        0        3      active sync   /dev/sda
   5       8       48        -      faulty   /dev/sdd
If it had been the RAID subsystem rather than SMART monitoring which had first spotted the issue then this would have happened already (and I would had received a different mail from the RAID checks instead of SMART). Once the disk is marked as failed then actually remove it from the array:
# mdadm --remove /dev/md0 /dev/disk/by-id/ata-ST3000DM001-1CH166_W1F2QSV6 
mdadm: hot removed /dev/disk/by-id/ata-ST3000DM001-1CH166_W1F2QSV6 from /dev/md0
And finally tell the kernel to delete the device:
# echo 1 > /sys/block/sdd/device/delete 
At this point I can physically swap the disks. At this point I noticed there were some interesting messages in dmesg, either from the echo to the delete node in sysfs or from the physical switch of the disks:
[1779238.656459] md: unbind<sdd>
[1779238.659455] md: export_rdev(sdd)
[1779258.686720] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Synchronizing SCSI cache
[1779258.700507] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Stopping disk
[1779259.377589] ata4.00: disabled
[1779371.126202] ata4: exception Emask 0x10 SAct 0x0 SErr 0x180000 action 0x6 frozen
[1779371.133740] ata4: edma_err_cause=00000020 pp_flags=00000000, SError=00180000
[1779371.141003] ata4: SError:   10B8B Dispar  
[1779371.145309] ata4: hard resetting link
[1779371.468708] ata4: SATA link down (SStatus 0 SControl 300)
[1779371.474340] ata4: EH complete
[1779557.416735] ata4: exception Emask 0x10 SAct 0x0 SErr 0x4010000 action 0xe frozen
[1779557.424356] ata4: edma_err_cause=00000010 pp_flags=00000000, dev connect
[1779557.431264] ata4: SError:   PHYRdyChg DevExch  
[1779557.436008] ata4: hard resetting link
[1779563.357089] ata4: link is slow to respond, please be patient (ready=0)
[1779567.449096] ata4: SRST failed (errno=-16)
[1779567.453316] ata4: hard resetting link
I wonder if I should have used another method to detach the disk, perhaps poking the controller rather than the disk (which rang a vague bell in my memory from last time this happened) but in the end the disk is broken and the kernel seems to have coped so I'm not too worried about it. It looked like the new disk had already been recognised:
[1779572.593471] scsi 3:0:0:0: Direct-Access     ATA      HGST HDN724040AL A5E0 PQ: 0 ANSI: 5
[1779572.604187] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] 7814037168 512-byte logical blocks: (4.00 TB/3.63 TiB)
[1779572.612171] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] 4096-byte physical blocks
[1779572.618252] sd 3:0:0:0: Attached scsi generic sg3 type 0
[1779572.626754] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Write Protect is off
[1779572.631771] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Mode Sense: 00 3a 00 00
[1779572.632588] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Write cache: enabled, read cache: enabled, doesn't support DPO or FUA
[1779572.665609]  sdd: unknown partition table
[1779572.671522] sd 3:0:0:0: [sdd] Attached SCSI disk
[1779855.362331]  sdd: unknown partition table
So I skipped trying to figure out how to perform a SCSI rescan and went straight to identifying that the new disk was called:
/dev/disk/by-id/ata-HGST_HDN724040ALE640_PK1338P4GY8ENB
and then tried to do a SMART conveyancing self-test with:
# smartctl -t conveyance /dev/disk/by-id/ata-HGST_HDN724040ALE640_PK1338P4GY8ENB
But this particular drive seems to not support that, so I went straight to editing /etc/smartd.conf to replace the old disk with the new one and:
# service smartmontools reload
With all that I was ready to add the new disk to the array:
# mdadm --add /dev/md0 /dev/disk/by-id/ata-HGST_HDN724040ALE640_PK1338P4GY8ENB
mdadm: added /dev/disk/by-id/ata-HGST_HDN724040ALE640_PK1338P4GY8ENB
# mdadm --detail /dev/md0 
/dev/md0:
[...] 
      State : clean, degraded, recovering 
 Active Devices : 3
Working Devices : 4
 Failed Devices : 0
  Spare Devices : 1
[...]
 Rebuild Status : 0% complete
[...]
Number   Major   Minor   RaidDevice State
   5       8       48        0      spare rebuilding   /dev/sdd
   1       8       32        1      active sync   /dev/sdc
   6       8       16        2      active sync   /dev/sdb
   4       8        0        3      active sync   /dev/sda
# cat /proc/mdstat 
Personalities : [raid6] [raid5] [raid4] 
md0 : active raid5 sdd[5] sda[4] sdb[6] sdc[1]
      5860538880 blocks super 1.2 level 5, 512k chunk, algorithm 2 [4/3] [_UUU]
      [>....................]  recovery =  0.0% (364032/1953512960) finish=1162.4min speed=28002K/sec
So now all that was left was to wait about 20 hours (with fingers crossed a second disk didn't die! spoiler: it didn't)

3 January 2016

Iustin Pop: Orcas Island day trip, June 2015

I just finished going through my last set of pending-review pictures from 2015, so I'm starting 2016 with a post about the past. In June 2015 I travelled to Seattle/Kirkland area for work purposes, and took advantage of a weekend to plan some more outdoors stuff. After looking around on maps, I settled on the San Juan islands, so I started looking at hiking possibilities, and in the end Orcas island looked the best choice - all the others had much lower elevations. So, early in the morning, I started driving from Kirkland to Anacortes ferry terminal. The drive itself is quite nice: after getting past the more populated areas, passing Everett, the the view are very nice, especially in the early morning hours and with very few traffic. At Anacortes, there was already a small queue, fortunately I had a pre-ordered ticket, and there was not much to do until the ferry arrived except to look forward at the day, and hope that the weather will stay nice. On the ferry then, crossing the straits and enjoying the very nice views: Perfect blue Catching the morning wind The ferry stops at Orcas (is it a town or just the terminal), and the next stop is Eastsound town. I pre-planned here a stop to get a second mini-breakfast: however, I misjudged what the portion sizes are and got myself a maxi-cinnamon roll at Caffe Olga: Second breakfast :) At least I knew I wasn't going to be hungry for a while :) Driving on, briefly stopping at Cascade Lake (I also stopped on the way back, the view is nice), then reaching the parking at the Twin Lakes trail on the shore of Mountain Lake. Good think I arrived somewhat early the parking was quite full already. I also got a bit confused on which way the hike starts, since it's not well marked, but after that I started the hike. It's also possible to drive up to Mount Constitution, but that's just lame; hiking from the base it's quite easy, if you find how to start the hike. Anyway: Starting to climb Finished the steepest part At one point, one meets this particular sign: Which way now? Beware the Little Summit is not to be missed! After ~40 minutes of hiking, with some parts a tiny bit strenuous, the view is really breathtaking. It's definitely worth stopping by, as the view is (IMHO) nicer than the view from the top of Mt. Constitution: Wow! The reason I say this is better is because you look towards ocean, whereas later the view is back towards the continent. And looking towards the big ocean is just perfect! Plus, the many small island, fully covered with forest are also nice. Onwards then towards the peak of Mount Constitution. You cross the "ridge" of the island, and your view shifts to the other side. Which means you see back to the Mountain Lake where the hike starts: Loocking back towards the start Here the path is more exposed, not through tall forest like at the beginning: Watching the horizon Right before reaching the peak, you pass through an interesting forest: A different kind of forest And then you're finally reaching the peak. Compared to Switzerland, it's very much not impressive (730m), but nevertheless, being so close to the ocean results in some very nice views: Couldn't have asked for better weather You can go into the small tower, and read through the history of the location, including the personal life of Robert Moran (shipbuilder), who retired in 1905 to Orcas island to live what (his doctors said to be) his last months, and who instead ended living until 1943. Not bad! To be filled under "too much stress is bad, nature is good" heading, I think. After eating a small packed lunch, I started back. At the beginning the forest is similar to the one back at the beginning of the hike, but then, as you reach the level of lakes, it is slightly different. More tall (old?) trees, more moss and ferns: Afternoon sun in the forest I passed briefly by the Twin Lakes, which were interesting (lots of submerged trunks), and then finally on the Twin Lakes trail back to the start. The views of Mountain Lake from here are also nice, especially in the less harsh afternoon sun: Reached Mountain Lake How did those trees get there? And then the hike was over. I still had some time to spend before the ferry I had a ticket on was scheduled, so I drove down to Olga town, as I was curious what was at the end of "Olga Road". Not much, but again nice views, and this very picturesque pier: Nice pier in Olga And then it was back to the ferry, waiting in line, getting on the ferry, and crossing back: Goodbye Orcas! Overall, it was a day well spent, part different, part similar to last year's mostly road trip. Definitely recommended if you're in the area, and there are a couple of other hikes on Orcas Island, plus all the other islands which make up the San Juans. However, traffic on the way back was not that awesome :/ Small price though!

19 November 2015

Matthew Garrett: If it's not practical to redistribute free software, it's not free software in practice

I've previously written about Canonical's obnoxious IP policy and how Mark Shuttleworth admits it's deliberately vague. After spending some time discussing specific examples with Canonical, I've been explicitly told that while Canonical will gladly give me a cost-free trademark license permitting me to redistribute unmodified Ubuntu binaries, they will not tell me what Any redistribution of modified versions of Ubuntu must be approved, certified or provided by Canonical if you are going to associate it with the Trademarks. Otherwise you must remove and replace the Trademarks and will need to recompile the source code to create your own binaries actually means.

Why does this matter? The free software definition requires that you be able to redistribute software to other people in either unmodified or modified form without needing to ask for permission first. This makes it clear that Ubuntu itself isn't free software - distributing the individual binary packages without permission is forbidden, even if they wouldn't contain any infringing trademarks[1]. This is obnoxious, but not inherently toxic. The source packages for Ubuntu could still be free software, making it fairly straightforward to build a free software equivalent.

Unfortunately, while true in theory, this isn't true in practice. The issue here is the apparently simple phrase you must remove and replace the Trademarks and will need to recompile the source code. "Trademarks" is defined later as being the words "Ubuntu", "Kubuntu", "Juju", "Landscape", "Edubuntu" and "Xubuntu" in either textual or logo form. The naive interpretation of this is that you have to remove trademarks where they'd be infringing - for instance, shipping the Ubuntu bootsplash as part of a modified product would almost certainly be clear trademark infringement, so you shouldn't do that. But that's not what the policy actually says. It insists that all trademarks be removed, whether they would embody an infringement or not. If a README says "To build this software under Ubuntu, install the following packages", a literal reading of Canonical's policy would require you to remove or replace the word "Ubuntu" even though failing to do so wouldn't be a trademark infringement. If an @ubuntu.com email address is present in a changelog, you'd have to change it. You wouldn't be able to ship the juju-core package without renaming it and the application within. If this is what the policy means, it's so impractical to be able to rebuild Ubuntu that it's not free software in any meaningful way.

This seems like a pretty ludicrous interpretation, but it's one that Canonical refuse to explicitly rule out. Compare this to Red Hat's requirements around Fedora - if you replace the fedora-logos, fedora-release and fedora-release-notes packages with your own content, you're good. A policy like this satisfies the concerns that Dustin raised over people misrepresenting their products, but still makes it easy for users to distribute modified code to other users. There's nothing whatsoever stopping Canonical from adopting a similarly unambiguous policy.

Mark has repeatedly asserted that attempts to raise this issue are mere FUD, but he won't answer you if you ask him direct questions about this policy and will insist that it's necessary to protect Ubuntu's brand. The reality is that if Debian had had an identical policy in 2004, Ubuntu wouldn't exist. The effort required to strip all Debian trademarks from the source packages would have been immense[2], and this would have had to be repeated for every release. While this policy is in place, nobody's going to be able to take Ubuntu and build something better. It's grotesquely hypocritical, especially when the Ubuntu website still talks about their belief that people should be able to distribute modifications without licensing fees.

All that's required for Canonical to deal with this problem is to follow Fedora's lead and isolate their trademarks in a small set of packages, then tell users that those packages must be replaced if distributing a modified version of Ubuntu. If they're serious about this being a branding issue, they'll do it. And if I'm right that the policy is deliberately obfuscated so Canonical can encourage people to buy licenses, they won't. It's easy for them to prove me wrong, and I'll be delighted if they do. Let's see what happens.

[1] The policy is quite clear on this. If you want to distribute something other than an unmodified Ubuntu image, you have two choices:
  1. Gain approval or certification from Canonical
  2. Remove all trademarks and recompile the source code
Note that option 2 requires you to rebuild even if there are no trademarks to remove.

[2] Especially when every source package contains a directory called "debian"

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23 October 2015

Joey Hess: propelling disk images

Following up on Then and Now ... In quiet moments at ICFP last August, I finished teaching Propellor to generate disk images. With an emphasis on doing a whole lot with very little new code and extreme amount of code reuse. For example, let's make a disk image with nethack on it. First, we need to define a chroot. Disk image creation reuses propellor's chroot support, described back in propelling containers. Any propellor properties can be assigned to the chroot, so it's easy to describe the system we want.
 nethackChroot :: FilePath -> Chroot
    nethackChroot d = Chroot.debootstrapped (System (Debian Stable) "amd64") mempty d
        & Apt.installed ["linux-image-amd64"]
        & Apt.installed ["nethack-console"]
        & accountFor gamer
        & gamer  hasInsecurePassword  "hello"
        & gamer  hasLoginShell  "/usr/games/nethack"
      where gamer = User "gamer"
Now to make an image from that chroot, we just have to tell propellor where to put the image file, some partitioning information, and to make it boot using grub.
 nethackImage :: RevertableProperty
    nethackImage = imageBuilt "/srv/images/nethack.img" nethackChroot
        MSDOS (grubBooted PC)
        [ partition EXT2  mountedAt  "/boot"
             setFlag  BootFlag
        , partition EXT4  mountedAt  "/"
             addFreeSpace  MegaBytes 100
        , swapPartition (MegaBytes 256)
        ]
The disk image partitions default to being sized to fit exactly the files from the chroot that go into each partition, so, the disk image is as small as possible by default. There's a little DSL to configure the partitions. To give control over the partition size, it has some functions, like addFreeSpace and setSize. Other functions like setFlag and extended can further adjust the partitions. I think that worked out rather well; the partition specification is compact and avoids unecessary hardcoded sizes, while providing plenty of control. By the end of ICFP, I had Propellor building complete disk images, but no boot loader installed on them.
Fast forward to today. After stuggling with some strange grub behavior, I found a working method to install grub onto a disk image. The whole disk image feature weighs in at: 203 lines to interface with parted
88 lines to format and mount partitions
90 lines for the partition table specification DSL and partition sizing
196 lines to generate disk images
75 lines to install grub on a disk image
652 lines of code total Which is about half the size of vmdebootstrap 1/4th the size of partman-base (probably 1/100th the size of total partman), and 1/13th the size of live-build. All of which do similar things, in ways that seem to me to be much less flexible than Propellor.
One thing I'm considering doing is extending this so Propellor can use qemu-user-static to create disk images for eg, arm. Add some u-boot setup, and this could create bootable images for arm boards. A library of configs for various arm boards could then be included in Propellor. This would be a lot easier than running the Debian Installer on an arm board. Oh! I only just now realized that if you have a propellor host configured, like this example for my dialup gateway, leech --
 leech = host "leech.kitenet.net"
        & os (System (Debian (Stable "jessie")) "armel")
        & Apt.installed ["linux-image-kirkwood", "ppp", "screen", "iftop"]
        & privContent "/etc/ppp/peers/provider"
        & privContent "/etc/ppp/pap-secrets"
        & Ppp.onBoot
        & hasPassword (User "root")
        & Ssh.installed
-- The host's properties can be extracted from it, using eg hostProperties leech and reused to create a disk image with the same properties as the host! So, when my dialup gateway gets struck by lightning again, I could use this to build a disk image for its replacement:
 import qualified Propellor.Property.Hardware.SheevaPlug as SheevaPlug
    laptop = host "darkstar.kitenet.net"
        & SheevaPlug.diskImage "/srv/images/leech.img" (MegaBytes 2000)
            (& propertyList "has all of leech's properties"
                (hostProperties leech))
This also means you can start with a manually built system, write down the properties it has, and iteratively run Propellor against it until you think you have a full specification of it, and then use that to generate a new, clean disk image. Nice way to transition from sysadmin days of yore to a clean declaratively specified system.

18 August 2015

Matthew Garrett: Canonical's deliberately obfuscated IP policy

I bumped into Mark Shuttleworth today at Linuxcon and we had a brief conversation about Canonical's IP policy. The short summary:
The even shorter summary: Canonical won't clarify their IP policy because they believe they can make more money if they don't.

Why do I keep talking about this? Because Canonical are deliberately making it difficult to create derivative works, and that's one of the core tenets of the definition of free software. Their IP policy is fundamentally incompatible with our community norms, and that's something we should care about rather than ignoring.

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20 July 2015

Matthew Garrett: Your Ubuntu-based container image is probably a copyright violation

Update: A Canonical employee responded here, but doesn't appear to actually contradict anything I say below.

I wrote about Canonical's Ubuntu IP policy here, but primarily in terms of its broader impact, but I mentioned a few specific cases. People seem to have picked up on the case of container images (especially Docker ones), so here's an unambiguous statement:

If you generate a container image that is not a 100% unmodified version of Ubuntu (ie, you have not removed or added anything), Canonical insist that you must ask them for permission to distribute it. The only alternative is to rebuild every binary package you wish to ship[1], removing all trademarks in the process. As I mentioned in my original post, the IP policy does not merely require you to remove trademarks that would cause infringement, it requires you to remove all trademarks - a strict reading would require you to remove every instance of the word "ubuntu" from the packages.

If you want to contact Canonical to request permission, you can do so here. Or you could just derive from Debian instead.

[1] Other than ones whose license explicitly grants permission to redistribute binaries and which do not permit any additional restrictions to be imposed upon the license grants - so any GPLed material is fine

comment count unavailable comments

8 April 2015

Ben Hutchings: Call for testing: linux 3.16.7-ckt9-1

As it is nearly time to release Debian 8 (codename jessie), I've uploaded a new version of the Linux kernel to unstable which I hope will be the version to go into the initial release (8.0). The changes from the current version in testing are mostly bug fixes: Please test this new version (which should be on mirrors within the next 24 hours) and report any regressions you spot. It's now too late to add new hardware support for Debian 8.0, but we'll probably be able to improve it in subsequent point releases. So, please also report driver changes that should be backported from later kernel versions to improve hardware support, with severity of 'important'. If you can provide precise information about which upstream commits are needed, that makes things easier for us, and you should add the 'patch' tag.

12 October 2014

Iustin Pop: Day trip on the Olympic Peninsula

Day trip on the Olympic Peninsula TL;DR: drove many kilometres on very nice roads, took lots of pictures, saw sunshine and fog and clouds, an angry ocean and a calm one, a quiet lake and lots and lots of trees: a very well spent day. Pictures at http://photos.k1024.org/Daytrips/Olympic-Peninsula-2014/. Sometimes I travel to the US on business, and as such I've been a few times in the Seattle area. Until this summer, when I had my last trip there, I was content to spend any extra days (weekend or such) just visiting Seattle itself, or shopping (I can spend hours in the REI store!), or working on my laptop in the hotel. This summer though, I thought - I should do something a bit different. Not too much, but still - no sense in wasting both days of the weekend. So I thought maybe driving to Mount Rainier, or something like that. On the Wednesday of my first week in Kirkland, as I was preparing my drive to the mountain, I made the mistake of scrolling the map westwards, and I saw for the first time the Olympic Peninsula; furthermore, I was zoomed in enough that I saw there was a small road right up to the north-west corner. Intrigued, I zoomed further and learned about Cape Flattery ( the northwestern-most point of the contiguous United States! ), so after spending a bit time reading about it, I was determined to go there. Easier said than done - from Kirkland, it's a 4h 40m drive (according to Google Maps), so it would be a full day on the road. I was thinking of maybe spending the night somewhere on the peninsula then, in order to actually explore the area a bit, but from Wednesday to Saturday it was a too short notice - all hotels that seemed OK-ish were fully booked. I spent some time trying to find something, even not directly on my way, but I failed to find any room. What I did manage to do though, is to learn a bit about the area, and to realise that there's a nice loop around the whole peninsula - the 104 from Kirkland up to where it meets the 101N on the eastern side, then take the 101 all the way to Port Angeles, Lake Crescent, near Lake Pleasant, then south toward Forks, crossing the Hoh river, down to Ruby Beach, down along the coast, crossing the Queets River, east toward Lake Quinault, south toward Aberdeen, then east towards Olympia and back out of the wilderness, into the highway network and back to Kirkland. This looked like an awesome road trip, but it is as long as it sounds - around 8 hours (continuous) drive, though skipping Cape Flattery. Well, I said to myself, something to keep in mind for a future trip to this area, with a night in between. I was still planning to go just to Cape Flattery and back, without realising at that point that this trip was actually longer (as you drive on smaller, lower-speed roads). Preparing my route, I read about the queues at the Edmonds-Kingston ferry, so I was planning to wake up early on the weekend, go to Cape Flattery, and go right back (maybe stop by Lake Crescent). Saturday comes, I - of course - sleep longer than my trip schedule said, and start the day in a somewhat cloudy weather, driving north from my hotel on Simonds Road, which was quite nicer than the usual East-West or North-South roads in this area. The weather was becoming nicer, however as I was nearing the ferry terminal and the traffic was getting denser, I started suspecting that I'll spend a quite a bit of time waiting to board the ferry. And unfortunately so it was (photo altered to hide some personal information): Waiting for the ferry. The weather at least was nice, so I tried to enjoy it and simply observe the crowd - people were looking forward to a weekend relaxing, so nobody seemed annoyed by the wait. After almost half an hour, time to get on the ferry - my first time on a ferry in US, yay! But it was quite the same as in Europe, just that the ship was much larger. Once I secured the car, I went up deck, and was very surprised to be treated with some excellent views: Harbour view Looking towards the sun   and away from it The crossing was not very short, but it seemed so, because of the view, the sun, the water and the wind. Soon we were nearing the other shore; also, see how well panorama software deals with waves :P! Near the other shore And I was finally on the "real" part of the trip. The road was quite interesting. Taking the 104 North, crossing the "Hood Canal Floating Bridge" (my, what a boring name), then finally joining the 101 North. The environment was quite varied, from bare plains and hills, to wooded areas, to quite dense forests, then into inhabited areas - quite a long stretch of human presence, from the Sequim Bay to Port Angeles. Port Angeles surprised me: it had nice views of the ocean, and an interesting port (a few big ships), but it was much smaller than I expected. The 101 crosses it, and in less than 10 minutes or so it was already over. I expected something nicer, based on the name, but Anyway, onwards! Soon I was at a crossroads and had to decide: I could either follow the 101, crossing the Elwha River and then to Lake Crescent, then go north on the 113/112, or go right off 101 onto 112, and follow it until close to my goal. I took the 112, because on the map it looked "nicer", and closer to the shore. Well, the road itself was nice, but quite narrow and twisty here and there, and there was some annoying traffic, so I didn't enjoy this segment very much. At least it had the very interesting property (to me) that whenever I got closer to the ocean, the sun suddenly disappeared, and I was finding myself in the fog: Foggy road So my plan to drive nicely along the coast failed. At one point, there was even heavy smoke (not fog!), and I wondered for a moment how safe was to drive out there in the wilderness (there were other cars though, so I was not alone). Only quite a bit later, close to Neah Bay, did I finally see the ocean: I saw a small parking spot, stopped, and crossing a small line of trees I found myself in a small cove? bay? In any case, I had the impression I stepped out of the daily life in the city and out into the far far wilderness: Dead trees on the beach Trees growing on a rock Small panorama of the cove There was a couple, sitting on chairs, just enjoying the view. I felt very much intruding, behaving like I did as a tourist: running in, taking pictures, etc., so I tried at least to be quiet . I then quickly moved on, since I still had some road ahead of me. Soon I entered Neah Bay, and was surprised to see once more blue, and even more blue. I'm a sucker for blue, whether sky blue or sea blue , so I took a few more pictures (watch out for the evil fog in the second one): View towards Neah Bay port Sea view from Neah Bay Well, the town had some event, and there were lots of people, so I just drove on, now on the last stretch towards the cape. The road here was also very interesting, yet another environment - I was driving on Cape Flattery Road, which cuts across the tip of the peninsula (quite narrow here) along the Waatch River and through its flooding plains (at least this is how it looked to me). Then it finally starts going up through the dense forest, until it reaches the parking lot, and from there, one goes on foot towards the cape. It's a very easy and nice walk (not a hike), and the sun was shining very nicely through the trees: Sunny forest Sun shinning down Wooden path But as I reached the peak of the walk, and started descending towards the coast, I was surprised, yet again, by fog: Ugly fog again! I realised that probably this means the cape is fully in fog, so I won't have any chance to enjoy the view. Boy, was I wrong! There are three viewpoints on the cape, and at each one I was just "wow" and "aah" at the view. Even thought it was not a sunny summer view, and there was no blue in sight, the combination between the fog (which was hiding the horizon and even the closer islands), the angry ocean which was throwing wave after wave at the shore, making a loud noise, and the fact that even this seemingly inhospitable area was just teeming with life, was both unexpected and awesome. I took here waay to many pictures, here are just a couple inlined: First view at the cape Birds 'enjoying' the weather Foggy shore I spent around half an hour here, just enjoying the rawness of nature. It was so amazing to see life encroaching on each bit of land, even though it was not what I would consider a nice place. Ah, how we see everything through our own eyes! The walk back was through fog again, and at one point it switched over back to sunny. Driving back on the same road was quite different, knowing what lies at its end. On this side, the road had some parking spots, so I managed to stop and take a picture - even though this area was much less wild, it still has that outdoors flavour, at least for me: Waatch River Back in Neah Bay, I stopped to eat. I had a place in mind from TripAdvisor, and indeed - I was able to get a custom order pizza at "Linda's Woodfired Kitchen". Quite good, and I ate without hurry, looking at the people walking outside, as they were coming back from the fair or event that was taking place. While eating, a somewhat disturbing thought was going through my mind. It was still early, around two to half past two, so if I went straight back to Kirkland I would be early at the hotel. But it was also early enough that I could - in theory at least - still do the "big round-trip". I was still rummaging the thought as I left On the drive back I passed once more near Sekiu, Washington, which is a very small place but the map tells me it even has an airport! Fun, and the view was quite nice (a bit of blue before the sea is swallowed by the fog): Sekiu view After passing Sekiu and Clallam Bay, the 112 curves inland and goes on a bit until you are at the crossroads: to the left the 112 continues, back the same way I came; to the right, it's the 113, going south until it meets the 101. I looked left - remembering the not-so-nice road back, I looked south - where a very appealing, early afternoon sun was beckoning - so I said, let's take the long way home! It's just a short stretch on the 113, and then you're on the 101. The 101 is a very nice road, wide enough, and it goes through very very nice areas. Here, west to south-west of the Olympic Mountains, it's a very different atmosphere from the 112/101 that I drove on in the morning; much warmer colours, a bit different tree types (I think), and more flat. I soon passed through Forks, which is one of the places I looked at when searching for hotels. I did so without any knowledge of the town itself (its wikipedia page is quite drab), so imagine my surprise when a month later I learned from a colleague that this is actually a very important place for vampire-book fans. Oh my, and I didn't even stop! This town also had some event, so I just drove on, enjoying the (mostly empty) road. My next planned waypoint was Ruby Beach, and I was looking forward to relaxing a bit under the warm sun - the drive was excellent, weather perfect, so I was watching the distance countdown on my Garmin. At two miles out, the "Near waypoint Ruby Beach" message appeared, and two seconds later the sun went out. What the I was hoping this is something temporary, but as I slowly drove the remaining mile I couldn't believe my eyes that I was, yet again, finding myself in the fog I park the car, thinking that asking for a refund would at least allow me to feel better - but it was I who planned the trip! So I resigned myself, thinking that possibly this beach is another special location that is always in the fog. However, getting near the beach it was clear that it was not so - some people were still in their bathing suits, just getting dressed, so it seems I was just unlucky with regards to timing. However, I the beach itself was nice, even in the fog (I later saw online sunny pictures, and it is quite beautiful), the the lush trees reach almost to the shore, and the way the rocks are sitting on the beach: A lonely dinghy Driftwood  and human construction People on the beach Since the weather was not that nice, I took a few more pictures, then headed back and started driving again. I was soo happy that the weather didn't clear at the 2 mile mark (it was not just Ruby Beach!), but alas - it cleared as soon as the 101 turns left and leaves the shore, as it crosses the Queets river. Driving towards my next planned stop was again a nice drive in the afternoon sun, so I think it simply was not a sunny day on the Pacific shore. Maybe seas and oceans have something to do with fog and clouds ! In Switzerland, I'm very happy when I see fog, since it's a somewhat rare event (and seeing mountains disappearing in the fog is nice, since it gives the impression of a wider space). After this day, I was a bit fed up with fog for a while Along the 101 one reaches Lake Quinault, which seemed pretty nice on the map, and driving a bit along the lake - a local symbol, the "World's largest spruce tree". I don't know what a spruce tree is, but I like trees, so I was planning to go there, weather allowing. And the weather did cooperate, except that the tree was not so imposing as I thought! In any case, I was glad to stretch my legs a bit: Path to largest spruce tree Largest spruce tree, far view Largest spruce tree, closer view Very short path back to the road However, the most interesting thing here in Quinault was not this tree, but rather - the quiet little town and the view on the lake, in the late afternoon sun: Quinault Quinault Lake view The entire town was very very quiet, and the sun shining down on the lake gave an even stronger sense of tranquillity. No wind, not many noises that tell of human presence, just a few, and an overall sense of peace. It was quite the opposite of the Cape Flattery and a very nice way to end the trip. Well, almost end - I still had a bit of driving ahead. Starting from Quinault, driving back and entering the 101, driving down to Aberdeen: Afternoon ride then turning east towards Olympia, and back onto the highways. As to Aberdeen and Olympia, I just drove through, so I couldn't make any impression of them. The old harbour and the rusted things in Aberdeen were a bit interesting, but the day was late so I didn't stop. And since the day shouldn't end without any surprises, during the last profile change between walking and driving in Quinault, my GPS decided to reset its active maps list and I ended up with all maps activated. This usually is not a problem, at least if you follow a pre-calculated route, but I did trigger recalculation as I restarted my driving, so the Montana was trying to decide on which map to route me - between the Garmin North America map and the Open StreeMap one, the result was that it never understood which road I was on. It always said "Drive to I5", even though I was on I5. Anyway, thanks to road signs, and no thanks to "just this evening ramp closures", I was able to arrive safely at my hotel. Overall, a very successful, if long trip: around 725 kilometres, 10h:30m moving, 13h:30m total: Track picture There were many individual good parts, but the overall think about this road trip was that I was able to experience lots of different environments of the peninsula on the same day, and that overall it's a very very nice area. The downside was that I was in a rush, without being able to actually stop and enjoy the locations I visited. And there's still so much to see! A two nights trip sound just about right, with some long hikes in the rain forest, and afternoons spent on a lake somewhere. Another not so optimal part was that I only had my "travel" camera (a Nikon 1 series camera, with a small sensor), which was a bit overwhelmed here and there by the situation. It was fortunate that the light was more or less good, but looking back at the pictures, how I wish that I had my "serious" DSLR So, that means I have two reasons to go back! Not too soon though, since Mount Rainier is also a good location to visit . If the pictures didn't bore you yet, the entire gallery is on my smugmug site. In any case, thanks for reading!

31 August 2014

Steve Kemp: A diversion - The National Health Service

Today we have a little diversion to talk about the National Health Service. The NHS is the publicly funded healthcare system in the UK.
Actually there are four such services in the UK, only one of which has this name:
  • The national health service (England)
  • Health and Social Care in Northern Ireland.
  • NHS Scotland.
  • NHS Wales.
In theory this doesn't matter, if you're in the UK and you break your leg you get carried to a hospital and you get treated. There are differences in policies because different rules apply, but the basic stuff "free health care" applies to all locations. (Differences? In Scotland you get eye-tests for free, in England you pay.)
My wife works as an accident & emergency doctor, and has recently changed jobs. Hearing her talk about her work is fascinating. The hospitals she's worked in (Dundee, Perth, Kirkcaldy, Edinburgh, Livingstone) are interesting places. During the week things are usually reasonably quiet, and during the weekend things get significantly more busy. (This might mean there are 20 doctors to hand, versus three at quieter times.) Weekends are busy largely because people fall down hills, get drunk and fight, and are at home rather than at work - where 90% of accidents occur. Of course even a "quiet" week can be busy, because folk will have heart-attacks round the clock, and somebody somewhere will always be playing with a power tool, a ladder, or both! So what was the point of this post? Well she's recently transferred to working for a childrens hospital (still in A&E) and the patiences are so very different. I expected the injuries/patients she'd see to differ. Few 10 year olds will arrive drunk (though it does happen), and few adults fall out of trees, or eat washing machine detergent, but talking to her about her day when she returns home is fascinating how many things are completely different from how I expected. Adults come to hospital mostly because they're sick, injured, or drunk. Children come to hospital mostly because their parents are paranoid. A child has a rash? Doctors are closed? Lets go to the emergency ward! A child has fallen out of a tree and has a bruise, a lump, or complains of pain? Doctors are closed? Lets go to the emergency ward! I've not kept statistics, though I wish I could, but it seems that she can go 3-5 days between seeing an actually injured or chronicly-sick child. It's the first-time-parents who bring kids in when they don't need to. Understandable, completely understandable, but at the same time I'm sure it is more than a little frustrating for all involved. Finally one thing I've learned, which seems completely stupid, is the NHS-Scotland approach to recruitment. You apply for a role, such as "A&E doctor" and after an interview, etc, you get told "You've been accepted - you will now work in Glasgow". In short you apply for a post, and then get told where it will be based afterward. There's no ability to say "I'd like to be a Doctor in city X - where I live", you apply, and get told where it is post-acceptance. If it is 100+ miles away you either choose to commute, or decline and go through the process again. This has lead to Kirsi working in hospitals with a radius of about 100km from the city we live in, and has meant she's had to turn down several posts. And that is all I have to say about the NHS for the moment, except for the implicit pity for people who have to pay (inflated and life-changing) prices for things in other countries.

10 February 2014

Russell Coker: Fingerprints and Authentication

Dustin Kirkland wrote an interesting post about fingerprint authentication [1]. He suggests using fingerprints for identifying users (NOT authentication) and gives an example of a married couple sharing a tablet and using fingerprints to determine who s apps are loaded. In response Tollef Fog Heen suggests using fingerprints for lightweight authentication, such as resuming a session after a toilet break [2]. I think that one of the best comments on the issue of authentication for different tasks is in XKCD comic 1200 [3]. It seems obvious that the division between administrator (who installs new device drivers etc) and user (who does everything from playing games to online banking with the same privileges) isn t working, and never could work well particularly when the user in question installs their own software. I think that one thing which is worth considering is the uses of a signature. A signature can be easily forged in many ways and they often aren t checked well. It seems that there are two broad cases of using a signature, one is to enter into legally binding serious contract such as a mortgage (where wanting to sign is the relevant issue) and the other is cases where the issue doesn t matter so much (EG signing off on a credit card purchase where the parties at risk can afford to lose money on occasion for efficient transactions). Signing is relatively easy but that s because it either doesn t matter much or because it s just a legal issue which isn t connected to authentication. The possibility of serious damage (sending life savings or incriminating pictures to criminals in another jurisdiction) being done instantly never applied to signatures. It seems to me that in many ways signatures are comparable to fingerprints and both of them aren t particularly good for authentication to a computer. In regard to Tollef s ideas about lightweight authentication I think that the first thing that would be required is direct user control over the authentication required to unlock a system. I have read about some Microsoft research into a computer monitoring the office environment to better facilitate the user s requests, an obvious extension to such research would be to have greater unlock requirements if there are more unknown people in the area or if the device is in a known unsafe location. But apart from that sort of future development it seems that having the user request a greater or lesser authentication check either at the time they lock their session or by policy would make sense. Generally users have a reasonable idea about the risk of another user trying to login with their terminal so user should be able to decide that a toilet break when at home only requires a fingerprint (enough to keep out other family members) while a toilet break at the office requires greater authentication. Mobile devices could use GPS location to determine unlock requirements, GPS can be forged, but if your attacker is willing and able to do that then you have a greater risk than most users. Some users turn off authentication on their phone because it s too inconvenient. If they had the option of using a fingerprint most of the time and a password for the times when a fingerprint can t be read then it would give an overall increase in security. Finally it should be possible to unlock only certain applications. Recent versions of Android support widgets on the lock screen so you can perform basic tasks such as checking the weather forecast without unlocking your phone. But it should be possible to have different authentication requirements for various applications. Using a fingerprint scan to allow playing games or reading email in the mailing list folder would be more than adequate security. But reading the important email and using SMS probably needs greater authentication. This takes us back to the XKCD cartoon.

11 January 2014

Johannes Schauer: Why do I need superuser privileges when I just want to write to a regular file

I have written a number of scripts to create Debian foreign architecture (mostly armel and armhf) rootfs images for SD cards or NAND flashing. I started with putting Debian on my Openmoko gta01 and gta02 and continued with devices like the qi nanonote, a marvel kirkwood based device, the Always Innovating Touchbook (close to the Beagleboard), the Notion Ink Adam and most recently the Golden Delicious gta04. Once it has been manufactured, I will surely also get my hands dirty with the Neo900 whose creators are currently looking for potential donors/customers to increase the size of the first batch and get the price per unit further down. Creating a Debian rootfs disk image for all these devices basically follows the same steps:
  1. create an disk image file, partition it, format the partitions and mount the / partition into a directory
  2. use debootstrap or multistrap to extract a selection of armel or armhf packages into the directory
  3. copy over /usr/bin/qemu-arm-static for qemu user mode emulation
  4. chroot into the directory to execute package maintainer scripts with dpkg --configure -a
  5. copy the disk image onto the sd card
It was not long until I started wondering why I had to run all of the above steps with superuser privileges even though everything except the final step (which I will not cover here) was in principle nothing else than writing some magic bytes to files I had write access to (the disk image file) in some more or less fancy ways. So I tried using fakeroot+fakechroot and after some initial troubles I managed to build a foreign architecture rootfs without needing root priviliges for steps two, three and four. I wrote about my solution which still included some workarounds in another article here. These workarounds were soon not needed anymore as upstream fixed the outstanding issues. As a result I wrote the polystrap tool which combines multistrap, fakeroot, fakechroot and qemu user mode emulation. Recently I managed to integrate proot support in a separate branch of polystrap. Last year I got the LEGO ev3 robot for christmas and since it runs Linux I also wanted to put Debian on it by following the instructions given by the ev3dev project. Even though ev3dev calls itself a "distribution" it only deviates from pure Debian by its kernel, some configuration options and its initial package selection. Otherwise it's vanilla Debian. The project also supplies some multistrap based scripts which create the rootfs and then partition and populate an SD card. All of this is of course done as the superuser. While the creation of the file/directory structure of the foreign Debian armel rootfs can by now easily be done without superuser priviliges by running multistrap under fakeroot/fakechroot/proot, creating the SD card image still seems to be a bit more tricky. While it is no problem to write a partition table to a regular file, it turned out to be tricky to mount these partition because tools like kpartx and losetup require superuser permissions. Tools like mkfs.ext3 and fuse-ext2 which otherwise would be able to work on a regular file without superuser privileges do not seem to allow to specify the required offsets that the partitions have within the disk image. With fuseloop there exists a tool which allows to "loop-mount" parts of a file in userspace to a new file and thus allows tools like mkfs.ext3 and fuse-ext2 to work as they normally do. But fuseloop is not packaged for Debian yet and thus also not in the current Debian stable. An obvious workaround would be to create and fill each partition in a separate file and concatenate them together. But why do I have to write my data twice just because I do not want to become the superuser? Even worse: because parted refuses to write a partition table to a file which is too small to hold the specified partitions, one spends twice the disk space of the final image: the image with the partition table plus the image with the main partition's content. So lets summarize: a bootable foreign architecture SD card disk image is nothing else than a regular file representing the contents of the SD card as a block device. This disk image is created in my home directory and given enough free disk space there is nothing stopping me from writing any possible permutation of bits to that file. Obviously I'm interested in a permutation representing a valid partition table and file systems with sensible content. Why do I need superuser privileges to generate such a sensible permutation of bits? Gladly it seems that the (at least in my opinion) hardest part of faking chroot and executing foreign architecture package maintainer scripts is already possible without superuser privileges by using fakeroot and fakechroot or proot together with qemu user mode emulation. But then there is still the blocker of creating the disk image itself through some user mode loop mounting of a filesystem occupying a virtual "partition" in the disk image. Why has all this only become available so very recently and still requires a number of workarounds to fully work in userspace? There exists a surprising amount of scripts which wrap debootstrap/multistrap. Most of them require superuser privileges. Does everybody just accept that they have to put a sudo in front of every invocation and hope for the best? While this might be okay for well tested code like debootstrap and multistrap the countless wrapper scripts might accidentally (be it a bug in the code or a typo in the given command line arguments) write to your primary hard disk instead of your SD card. Such behavior can easily be mitigated by not executing any such script with superuser privileges in the first place. Operations like loop mounting affect the whole system. Why do I have to touch anything outside of my home directory (/dev/loop in this case) to populate a file in it with some meaningful bits? Virtualization is no option because every virtualization solution again requires root privileges. One might argue that a number of solutions just require some initial setup by root to then later be used by a regular user (for example /etc/fstab configuration or the schroot approach). But then again: why do I have to write anything outside of my home directory (even if it is only once) to be able to write something meaningful to a file in it? The latter approach also does not work if one cannot become root in the first place or is limited by a virtualized environment. Imagine you are trying to build a Debian rootfs on a machine where you just have a regular user account. Or a situation I was recently in: I had a virtual server which denied me operations like loop mounting. Given all these downsides, why is it still so common to just assume that one is able and willing to use sudo and be done with it in most cases? I really wonder why technologies like fakeroot and fakechroot have only been developed this late. Has this problem not been around since the earliest days of Linux/Unix? Am I missing something and rambling around for nothing? Is this idea a lost cause or something that is worth spending time and energy on to extend and fix the required tools?

5 October 2013

Ian Campbell: qcontrol: support for x86 devices

Until now qcontrol has mostly only supported only ARM (kirkwood) based devices (upstream has a configuration example for the HP Media Vault too, but I don't know if it is used). Debian bug #712191 asked for at least some basic support for x86 based devices. The mostly don't use the QNAP PIC used on the ARM devices so much of the qcontrol functionality is irrelevant but at least some of them do have a compatible A125 LCD. Unfortunately I don't have any x86 QNAP devices and I've been unable to figure out a way to detect that we are running on an QNAP box as opposed to any random x86 box so I've not been able to implement the hardware auto-detection used on ARM to configure qcontrol for the appropriate device at installation time. I don't want to include a default configuration which tries to drive an LCD on some random serial port since I have no way of knowing what will be on the other end or what the device might do if sent random bytes of the LCD control protocol. So I've implemented debconf prompting for the device type which is used only if auto-detection fails, so it shouldn't change anything for existing users on ARM. You can find this in version 0.5.2-3~exp1 in experimental (see DebianExperimental on the Debian wiki for how to use experimental). Currently the package only knows about the existing set of ARM platforms and a default "unknown" platform, which has an empty configuration. If you have a QNAP device (ARM or x86) which is not currently supported then please install the package from experimental and tailor /etc/qcontrol.conf for you platform (e.g. by uncommenting the a125 support and giving it the correct serial port). Then send me the result along with the device's name. If the device is an ARM one please also send me the contents of /proc/cpuinfo too so I can implement auto-detection. If you know how to detect a particular x86 QNAP device programmatically (via DMI decoding, PCI probing, sysfs etc, but make sure it is 100% safe on non-QNAP platforms) then please do let me know.

3 October 2013

Tollef Fog Heen: Fingerprints as lightweight authentication

Dustin Kirkland recently wrote that "Fingerprints are usernames, not passwords". I don't really agree, I think fingerprints are fine for lightweight authentication. iOS at least allows you to only require a pass code after a time period has expired, so you don't have to authenticate to the phone all the time. Replacing no authentication with weak authentication (but only for a fairly short period) will improve security over the current status, even if it's not perfect. Having something similar for Linux would also be reasonable, I think. Allow authentication with a fingerprint if I've only been gone for lunch (or maybe just for a trip to the loo), but require password or token if I've been gone for longer. There's a balance to be struck between convenience and security.

6 May 2013

Martin Michlmayr: Upgrading to Debian 7.0 (wheezy) on ARM

Debian 7.0 (wheezy) has been released. Here are some notes if you're running Debian on an ARM-based NAS device or plug computer and are planning to upgrade. First of all, if you're running Debian on a plug computer, such as the SheevaPlug, make sure that you have u-boot version 2011.12-3 (or higher). If you're using an older version, the Linux kernel in wheezy will not boot! You can read my u-boot upgrade instructions on how to check the version of u-boot and upgrade it. Second, check your /etc/kernel-img.conf file. If it still contains the following line, please remove this line.
postinst_hook = flash-kernel
This postinst_hook directive was needed in the past but flash-kernel is called automatically nowadays whenever you install a new kernel. Now you're almost ready to start with your upgrade. Before you start, make sure to read the release notes for Debian 7.0 on ARM. This document contains a lot of information on performing a successful upgrade. During the kernel upgrade, you'll get the following message about the boot loader configuration:
The boot loader configuration for this system was not recognized. These
settings in the configuration may need to be updated:
 * The root device ID passed as a kernel parameter;
 * The boot device ID used to install and update the boot loader.
On ARM-based NAS devices and plug computers, you can simply ignore this warning. We put the root device into the ramdisk so it will be updated automatically. There are no other issues I'm aware of, so good luck with your upgrade and have fun with Debian wheezy!

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