Search Results: "jhr"

2 June 2014

Francesca Ciceri: 100 bugs triaged: achievement unlocked

After two weeks working as OPW intern for Mozilla, it's time for a recap!
What exactly I've been doing in these two weeks? 100 bugs triaged: achievement unlocked! Yes, this is the thing I'm most proud of. I'm a bit cheating here, as strictly speaking, since the beginning of the internship I've triaged only 44 bugs.
But I've decided to count from the beginning of my activity on bugzilla, at the end of March, since I've started work on that as part of the small contribution required for applying to OPW.
Therefore, it's all OPW related :) Here's the grand total. Right now, I've decided to work on an average of 5 bugs a day: it's mostly triage and/or verification, which is quite fun.
It consists in trying to have a more complete and detailed bug report for the developers: asking the right questions to the reporter, ensuring that the bug is filed against the right product or component and all the information about platforms and version are correct. Or verifying that the bug isn't a duplicate, which involves doing some voodoo with Bugzilla quicksearch (I'm not so good with that yet, mostly because I'm not imaginative enough in the queries... but I'm getting better!) Sometimes triaging means reading lots of documentation (to be sure that something is a bug and not a feature) and checking meta-bugs and release notes to be able to pinpoint the time when something was introduced and the reasoning behind it.
That takes a lot of time, but it makes you discover some funny things, like the Mighty Bouncing Unicorn. And while I know it sounds a bit cruel, it's really good when you're verifying a fix and you find it's not totally ok, or that it triggered another bug.
I've been assured that feeling satisfied after that it's an essential part of the sadistic QA work. Writing FAQs for new triager This started as a personal project even before knowing I've been selected for OPW, and it's now part of my internship: I've been writing a first draft of FAQ for those who approach for the first time the Bug Triaging and Verifying work in Mozilla. It meant taking a whole lot of IRC logs and scan them for the most asked questions during bugdays, and you can find here my first draft. I'll send a RFC today about it on dev-quality mailing list and link it to the main Bugdays page. Lessons learned So, what I've learned in these two weeks? That I'm pretty good at figuring things alone, but I like to have feedback on what I'm working on.
That testing things is an art, and perfectionism is a big plus.
That there are such things as stupid questions, but you have to ask them nonetheless.
That people in the Mozilla community are quite friendly and not scary at all. Not even in video! :) Wishlist I've been thinking about this a lot, and I think I'd like to have They will probably become my next pet project.

7 December 2013

Hideki Yamane: I was in Mini DebConf in Taiwan 2013

I've done GPG key sign for Mini DebConf in Taiwan 2013 participates, and written an article for Japanese magazine, Software Design 2014/Jan. This means, my short trip has been ended, at last.





In this event, I've talked about "local community" for Debian, a bit (PDF/ODF are in Debian Wiki).
Local Community for Debian (2013 Taiwan miniDebConf) from Hideki Yamane

Probably you know, most of Debian contributors are in Euro/America(North and South), not in Asia. But there are lots of talented people. It means: there is huge possibility for Debian :)


I hope we Asian Debian people unite and publish its community work more, and do "DebConf in Asia" - in the future.

16 February 2012

Jan Hauke Rahm: Debugging getopt weirdness

I ve been working on enum again recently and got completely stuck in getopt_long() return values. I don t want to bore you with details, so let me cut to the chase: I needed a way to look into what getopt_long() is actually doing. Now, there are a few ways to figure out the doings of a function. If it s your own code, you could just go ahead and add a few printf()s to see if your variables fill up as intended. Then you could use gdb to walk through your running code. But what if you want to do so in functions outside the scope of your own code? In my case: getopt, i.e. libc? Obviously, you can download the library, add your printf() stuff, compile and install it, and see it all happening. But libc isn t exactly small, fast-compiling, and you really don t want to mess it up and have it installed on your system. So how about just taking what you actually care for and push it in? This is nothing experimental or particularly hacky . I just don t want to forget about it and maybe someone can make use of it. So here we go Download your libc sources to a new directory and copy the files you need. Try something like
mkdir -p /tmp/getopt/mygetopt
cd /tmp/getopt
apt-get source eglibc
cp eglibc-*/posix/getopt* mygetopt/
cd mygetopt
Now write up a primitive Makefile:
all: libmygetopt.so
libmygetopt.so: getopt.c getopt1.c getopt_int.h getopt.h
	gcc -shared -Wl,-soname,libmygetopt.so.1 -fPIC -o libmygetopt.so.1.0.0 getopt1.c getopt.c
	ln -s libmygetopt.so.1.0.0 libmygetopt.so.1
	ln -s libmygetopt.so.1 libmygetopt.so
clean:
	$(RM) libmygetopt*
In order for this to actually work, I fiddled around with a few #ifdef s in getopt.c. But that s something you ll probably find out yourselves. You should at least be able to compile it ( make it). Now put a printf statement somewhere in the function you want to inspect. Recompile the lib and then go back to your actual program. Running the program ist easy.
src/enum -p1 1 3
1.0
2.0
3.0
Surprisingly, running it using your own getopt version is just as easy. Just push your library in:
LD_PRELOAD=libmygetopt.so LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/tmp/getopt/mygetopt:$LD_LIBRARY_PATH src/enum -p1 1 3
Yo, Ulrich, my getopt version is waaaay cooler than yours!
Yo, Ulrich, my getopt version is waaaay cooler than yours!
1.0
2.0
3.0
If you re disappointed now, that s your own fault. I said it in the beginning, this is nothing special. It s not my idea. It s something that developers all use all the time or something like that. In case you didn t know about it, good for you. Otherwise, sorry for reading my memory dump.

8 November 2011

Jan Hauke Rahm: On GNOME 3

Since there have been a few blog posts about GNOME 3 already, I m sure you don t mind me adding one. I m one of those who don t do any work, just lurk around and wait for stuff to be fixed or working in the first place. I also don t like compiling GNOME myself. I barely touched the already packaged stuff in the repository of our Debian GNOME packaging team. But I run unstable plus stuff from experimental. I ll thus have a bit of a different experience with GNOME 3 than current testing users who at least in parts don t seem to like what they re getting. That being said I love it. No, I don t mind running network manager on my systems, I even have it on my netbook (Atom processor). I used wicd for a long time because network manager really got nothing done back in the days (half a year ago or what :)). Nowadays, since version 0.9, it works fine for me. No fiddling around with config files, perfect integration in the desktop, and LAN and WLAN Just Work [tm]. No, I don t like if some weird dependencies dictate what tools to use. I usually used pidgin for messaging, for instance. Now I m using empathy, simply because it s best integrated in GNOME. And no, I won t switch from mutt to evolution. :-P And there are more such cases. Also, these weird accessibility tools that are stuck in the gnome-shell top panel , I don t need them. Still there. (There s an extension to remove it, by the way.) Also, I must say, GNOME 3.2 is a lot better than 3.0 already. And I think 3.4 might do the final trick for me. Fact is, with GNOME 3 I have a much cleaner desktop, there is more room for windows (which is nice on a netbook display), there are web apps which I already use a lot, and it has a professional, not too playful look (i.e. a few effects, clear and consistent theming, no bubbling windows). And the new notification stuff is just awesome, especially with the empathy integration. Oh, and too many mouse click to access an application? 1) Put your most used apps in the favorites bar (or whatever it is called); it s just one click then. 2) Press your meta-key (that way our name for the windows key, or was that the ESC key? Whatever, press your windows key), type in the first two or three letters of your application, and hit enter; you don t need a mouse at all. There. It had to be said. :)

26 September 2011

Jan Hauke Rahm: zsh, tab completion, remote hosts, and collaboration

Using zsh as default shell is perfect. Using grml-zsh stuff to configure it, even better. Using XTaran s config, way better. Using your own config, invaluable. Now, there is one thing that always bothered me: having all hosts I usually deal with in my ~/.ssh/config in order to have tab completion (and short names). I wanted to improve the situation and was kindly pointed in a different direction by Myon, namely to just use the ~/.ssh/known_hosts for tab completion. How about that? I started playing around with the config and, as it turns out, Axel already has something ready. Unfortunately, it didn t fulfill all my needs yet. That is because I have multiple known_hosts files. Martin already filed a bug to have ssh read ~/.ssh/known_hosts.d/* but that isn t resolved yet either, even though upstream is aware of it. I thus had to point tab completion and ssh to multiple files by hand. But that s not too bad for now. Let s have a look: Host *
HashKnownHosts no
Host *.your-work.com
User that-is-what-they-call-me-at-work
UserKnownHostsFile ~/.ssh/known_hosts.work
Host *.debian.org
UserKnownHostsFile ~/.ssh/known_hosts.debian
What am I doing? Well, we need to deactivate the hashing of known hosts. Otherwise your known_hosts files aren t readable as needed. Then you define your known_hosts files for the domains you care about. Pretty straight forward. Now, how about tab completion in zsh? Well, easy part actually: [ -f ~/.ssh/config ] && : $ (A)ssh_config_hosts:=$ $ $ $ (@M)$ (f)"$(<~/.ssh/config)" :#Host * #Host :#*\** :#*\?*
[ -f ~/.ssh/known_hosts ] && : $ (A)ssh_known_hosts:=$ $ $ (f)"$(<$HOME/.ssh/known_hosts)" %%\ * %%,*
[ -f ~/.ssh/known_hosts.work ] && : $ (A)ssh_known_hosts_work:=$ $ $ (f)"$(<$HOME/.ssh/known_hosts.work)" %%\ * %%,*
[ -f ~/.ssh/known_hosts.debian ] && : $ (A)ssh_known_hosts_debian:=$ $ $ (f)"$(<$HOME/.ssh/known_hosts.debian)" %%\ * %%,*
zstyle ':completion:*:hosts' hosts $ssh_config_hosts $ssh_known_hosts $ssh_known_hosts_work $ssh_known_hosts_debian What's here? We read and parse your ~/.ssh/config for configured hosts, then we parse all your known_hosts files which are for me: ~/.ssh/known_hosts, ~/.ssh/known_hosts.work, and ~/.ssh/known_hosts.debian. And lastly, all is added to zsh completion for hosts. That actually works. :) Axel, that makes a diff for you looking like this: diff --git a/zsh.d/70-completion b/zsh.d/70-completion
index e92e068..5abf5cc 100644
--- a/zsh.d/70-completion
+++ b/zsh.d/70-completion
@@ -8,6 +8,8 @@
[ -f ~/.ssh/config ] && : $ (A)ssh_config_hosts:=$ $ $ $ (@M)$ (f)"$(<~/.ssh/config)" :#Host * #Host :#*\** :#*\?*
[ -f ~/.ssh/known_hosts ] && : $ (A)ssh_known_hosts:=$ $ $ (f)"$(<$HOME/.ssh/known_hosts)" %%\ * %%,*
+[ -f ~/.ssh/known_hosts.work ] && : $ (A)ssh_known_hosts_work:=$ $ $ (f)"$(<$HOME/.ssh/known_hosts.work)" %%\ * %%,*
+[ -f ~/.ssh/known_hosts.debian ] && : $ (A)ssh_known_hosts_debian:=$ $ $ (f)"$(<$HOME/.ssh/known_hosts.debian)" %%\ * %%,*
-zstyle ':completion:*:*:*' hosts $ssh_config_hosts $ssh_known_hosts
+zstyle ':completion:*:hosts' hosts $ssh_config_hosts $ssh_known_hosts $ssh_known_hosts_work $ssh_known_hosts_debian
Care to merge? Oh, and before I forget... Of course you don't need to check each and every host by yourself. Debian provides ssh keys for all hosts on master. Just do a scp master.debian.org:/etc/ssh/ssh_known_hosts ~/.ssh/known_hosts.debian and I'm sure, your security aware employer has such a file for you as well. Doesn't he? ;)

28 April 2011

Jan Hauke Rahm: Save the environment and come to LinuxTag 2011 in Berlin

It s the time of the year again. LinuxTag is right up and, of course, Debian is part of it. But, it wouldn t be us if we didn t have any problems at all. Well, the situation isn t real bad but could deserve some improvement. Improvement about what, you ask? Isn t that obvious? It s man power that we need (women shall feel included :)). Now, LinuxTag 2011 is going to happen, with or without you, on May 11th to 14th. Needless to say that you ll be missing quite a lot if you don t attend. I mean, even Zack will be there. And so will I (most probably at least). And even more Who s willing to miss that, really? So, pack your stuff, get a train ticket or your car or your friend s car or the car of a friend of your friend who knows a friend who doesn t know you but still wants to give you his car which you don t even need since you already have the car of that friend of your friend and now you have two cars and can even bring another bunch of fellas who probably own cars themselves and now you re thinking about the environment because of all the cars that will come to Berlin and because of that you suddenly buy a train ticket and leave all three cars at home and in the end only one thing counts: you ll be there. Oh, and before you drive off to your local train station, please put your name into our neat little list so we can count on you as booth staff that s because we need man power in case you missed that section or somehow forgot it while thinking about that guy who is the friend of your friend that owns a car but rather comes by train as it saves the environment.

17 February 2011

Jan Hauke Rahm: Gnome calendar

Dear lazyweb, I m using Gnome for quite some time now and I m always satisfied with the interfaces I have to whatever I need. There is one thing, though, that I miss: a calendar. I don t like evolution, I don t need another mail client. What I want is a simple, yet sophisticated application that I can put appointments in and which reminds me of them (recurring issues should be possible, too). It may but doesn t have to be somehow attached to the Gnome clock or whatever. Though I expect it to look Gnome-like and be accessible from the panel. Do you know such? And is there even a Debian package for it? Thanks.
<fb:like action="like" colorscheme="light" href="http://blog.jhr-online.de/266" layout="default" show_faces="true" width="400">

8 December 2010

Jan Hauke Rahm: Google maps irritated?

<fb:share-button href="http://blog.jhr-online.de/169" type="button"></fb:share-button>Countless times already have I used Google s amazing feature called maps. Admittedly, if you know me, you might wonder how I can be advertising Google. At least as often as I used google maps, I have told people about google s evilness. They re making their users transparent in ways most people can t even imagine transparent to other users (just like Facebook does) but, more importantly, transparent to themselves and their advertising customers. Technically skilled people reading my blog probably just nod and scoll down now :) Well, there still is something about Google that makes me use their developments: they are good. I don t know any other online service to create own maps, get directions etc. with as much detail and huge amount of data as google delivers. Thus, Google maps became my main source for locations and directions world wide. As such, I wanted to use it to get directions between places in Berlin, Germany. Apparently, Google s software had some kind of hick up or whatever, though. They got the directions right but somehow I doubt the map is anyhow related to what I requested. See for yourself Google maps irritatedYes, yes, no software is perfect but still :)

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8 November 2010

Jan Hauke Rahm: Yet another new gpg key

Since thousands of people seem to like RSA keys these days and my key is old anyways, I thought: how about running where the other lemmings run So, here it is, my transition to a new gpg key. A properly written transition document is to be found here, obviously signed by both the old and the new key. I d appreciate signatures if your signing policy allows (and you re not insanely signing anything that looks like it could be signed).

6 September 2010

Jan Hauke Rahm: tmux entered my system

Been playing with that thought for a while now, finally got to rebuilding it for lenny, now I m using it tmux is the new screen. To have fun already I read a few short introductions and got myself a few suggestions for a proper .tmux.conf. So, for root I have this one now: # Copy mode
unbind [
bind Escape copy-mode
# Use Vi mode
setw -g mode-keys vi
# Make mouse useful in copy mode
setw -g mode-mouse on
# More straight forward key bindings for splitting
unbind %
bind split-window -h
bind h split-window -h
unbind '"'
bind - split-window -v
bind v split-window -v
# History
set -g history-limit 4000
# Terminal emulator window title
set -g set-titles on
set -g set-titles-string '#S:#I.#P #W'
# Status Bar
set -g status-bg black
set -g status-fg white
set -g status-interval 1
set -g status-left '#[fg=green]#H#[default]'
# no line break here, it's just to long for my blog layout!
set -g status-right '#[fg=yellow]#(cut -d " " -f 1-4 /proc/loadavg)#[default] #[fg=cyan,bold]%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S#[default]'
# Notifying if other windows has activities
setw -g monitor-activity on
set -g visual-activity on
# Highlighting the active window in status bar
setw -g window-status-current-bg red
# Clock
setw -g clock-mode-colour green
setw -g clock-mode-style 24
# Create a default session
new -n htop -d htop
setw -t htop monitor-activity off
neww -n aptitude -d aptitude
neww -d
Then I added a new alias to my user s zsh config: alias root='su -c "tmux attach"' Why tmux attach ? Because tmux would start a new session which I don t want it to. The config already starts a session which we can immediately attach to. Also, when such session was started I can attach to it as a user with the very same command over and over again. That makes it pretty handy as I always have htop, aptitude and a free shell available in a nice tmux session. Great. How did I live until now? ;-)

29 June 2010

Jan Hauke Rahm: [OT] Online magazine in German about music

It s pretty off topic for my blog since I usually only blog about technical stuff. But this is just great. Real life people having a real look at concerts of prominent and not-so-prominent musicians. And it s all in German which is a nice thing since most of such stuff I have to find on English web sites (except the obvious German big press influence). Made me notice I missed the concert of Jamie Cullum of course. But the article is quite nice and I definitely enjoy reading more of those. Have a look if you re as keen on music as I am, or not. :)

11 June 2010

Jan Hauke Rahm: MiniDebConf in Berlin, now

Good morning everyone, after quite some time of organization, we got the MiniDebConf running in Berlin. Yesterday at 9.30, Zack had the pleasure of opening the event which seems to be reflected in the press already. After that, we had nice talks, one every hour from 10 to 6 with mine being the last one of the day at 5 p.m. Yes, I did it :) Slides, links, and all that stuff will follow in a later post, or more official announcements. Right now I m preparing myself to get back to the fairground. The second day starts with another bunch of talks at 10 and I m excited to meet different people again and hear more interesting talks. The BSP went well. :) Actually, we didn t really fix many bugs, I guess. A few maintainers stayed after the event as well as a couple of users completely new to packaging. Thus, it was more like a small social event bit it was really fun. And of course the HackLab is still open today, so we have every chance to fix more bugs This just as a small input from where we stand. More is to come some time later, probably after the weekend, we ll see

3 June 2010

Jan Hauke Rahm: Berlin, next week

It seems I ve missed quite a few weeks in my countdown to our Mini DebConf. Fortunately, it s not too late for you to join even if, right now, you don t know why you should! So what s the status? Well, we ve had out problems in the beginning to start the whole thing but we managed. There are a few minor issues left, I admit. If you happen to have a bit time on 10th or 11th to hold the camera for an hour or so, contact us! Or if there is *anything* you would wanna do to help us out a bit, don t be shy. You don t need to be a known Debian contributor, you don t need to know us. Arguably, you should know Debian but then, if you re able to spell the name correctly, you re probably in. :-) Apart from that, we really think it s gonna be awesome. Not only will there be a few Debian Developers from outside Germany, like our project leader zack who we have the honor of listening to for he has the first talk on Thursday. There will also be quite a few German faces that some of us haven t met yet have you met Sebastian, the chief of our beloved debianforum.de, yet? We are going to have a great time and you re a fool not to join. Thus, a last time for all of you who still don t know what I m talking about: Next week there ll be the famous LinuxTag in Berlin from Wednesday to Saturday. Right in the middle, on Thursday and Friday, we, the Debian community, will have a Mini DebConf right there. There will be talks about different Debian related things. And many active developers will be there happy to talk to you about whatever you always wanted to know or say about Debian. And then, not to forget, we ll have a hacklab where you can easily plug in your notebook and start hacking with us. Have an idea to improve Debian? Always wanted to know how to fix a bug? You want to make Debian Squeeze the best Debian release ever? Join us it seems we re fighting on the same side. See you there, guys! PS: The latest and hottest news about it.

26 April 2010

Jan Hauke Rahm: Talking about Free Software

When I first started using Free Software yes, that s quite some time ago I found it the right thing to do. It felt like I was first time ever really controlling what my computer does. Took just a bit of time to notice I really never knew anything about it. Well, almost at least. Then when I started contributing to Free Software this obviously changed. One of the freedoms is to learn from the code you re running. And I did it by reading, contributing, doing nonsense with it, reimplementing it you know the deal. Starting to work on Debian was something that just evolved out of it. Doing so gave me the opportunity to give back. I never achieved that actually, though. At least I don t consider my contributions even remotely sufficient to make up for the great deal of software that I use sometimes without noticing it. Still there s lots of stuff that I don t have a clue of and I rely on other developers to do their (volunteer) job. Otherwise my knowledge wouldn t help much. I could never continue kernel development if those kernel hackers all stepped back for instance. I guess, it s getting more and more difficult the closer the piece of code is to hardware. Another thought I had was about Free Software in general. It s more than just the code (although it might be the most important part), it s also a concept that needs to be communicated. Firefox on Windows shows how Free Software can have a big market share in an otherwise closed source environment. Yet I m not sure all users know about it being open source and what that means (hear them talk about Freeware instead). And who is dealing with this conceptual stuff? I decided to do something about all that. Now I don t really have money but a bit I thought I could share. And I could set yet another sign by publicly talking about it, or casually mentioning that I consider Free Software and Linux a good thing. So you will see a mail signature now below all my mails. I always wondered what one might gain with such and now I found a reason to include one. It reads:
Debian Developer                                 www.debian.org
Member of the Linux Foundation                    www.linux.com
Fellow of the Free Software Foundation Europe      www.fsfe.org

21 April 2010

Jan Hauke Rahm: Mini DebConf 2010 Berlin. See you there?

Hi everyone!Mini DebConf 2010 Berlin - I'm attending I hope you all have already seen at least parts of our preparation for a Mini DebConf in Berlin this year. There are various posts on planet, some mails on -project and -events-eu and as I saw just today even identi.ca is not spared. If you haven t heard of it, this is your chance. Every year the LinuxTag (Linux day) is a four-day event in Berlin, Germany, likely comparable to other OpenSource events. It provides talks, discussion and a lot of booths of various Free Software projects. This year s LinuxTag will be on June 9th till 12th. Since it s held on a huge fairground, we were able to get quite some piece of it for our own use. We will have two areas, one for talks, the other as a hack lab and use right the middle of the LinuxTag for the Mini DebConf: June 10th and 11th with the hack lab open all through the night of course. Finding sponsors was the hardest deal in the beginning and we re not done with it yet. We got enough money, though, to make the decision and we still hope to get everything covered. Luckily we also have hardware sponsors and help on various issues we would not be able to deal with on our own. What s still missing, is you! :) The schedule for the talks is almost full, yet the hack lab could need more man power. Our idea is since we will be in freeze by then, right? to do a BSP incl. help for newbies. That means we will not only try to help users, we also would like to teach how to squash bugs and thus attract possible maintainers and other contributors. All that of course only works if we are enough people there. Now I understand this might seem to be only attractive to german developers as most of the talks will be held in german. But I strongly believe we can deal with it if you don t speak german. :) And at least on the first day of the event, you can meet our new DPL zack who will have the pleasure to provide the opening talk. Yay! Having said all this, you are more than invited to attend and help. Find more info (and a way to offer help) in the debconf wiki and enjoy more press announcements within the next few weeks. http://wiki.debconf.org/wiki/Miniconf-LT-Berlin/2010 On OFTC:
/join #debian-miniconf-berlin

Jan Hauke Rahm: Mini DebConf 2010 Berlin. See you there?

Hi everyone!Mini DebConf 2010 Berlin - I'm attending I hope you all have already seen at least parts of our preparation for a Mini DebConf in Berlin this year. There are various posts on planet, some mails on -project and -events-eu and as I saw just today even identi.ca is not spared. If you haven t heard of it, this is your chance. Every year the LinuxTag (Linux day) is a four-day event in Berlin, Germany, likely comparable to other OpenSource events. It provides talks, discussion and a lot of booths of various Free Software projects. This year s LinuxTag will be on June 9th till 12th. Since it s held on a huge fairground, we were able to get quite some piece of it for our own use. We will have two areas, one for talks, the other as a hack lab and use right the middle of the LinuxTag for the Mini DebConf: June 10th and 11th with the hack lab open all through the night of course. Finding sponsors was the hardest deal in the beginning and we re not done with it yet. We got enough money, though, to make the decision and we still hope to get everything covered. Luckily we also have hardware sponsors and help on various issues we would not be able to deal with on our own. What s still missing, is you! :) The schedule for the talks is almost full, yet the hack lab could need more man power. Our idea is since we will be in freeze by then, right? to do a BSP incl. help for newbies. That means we will not only try to help users, we also would like to teach how to squash bugs and thus attract possible maintainers and other contributors. All that of course only works if we are enough people there. Now I understand this might seem to be only attractive to german developers as most of the talks will be held in german. But I strongly believe we can deal with it if you don t speak german. :) And at least on the first day of the event, you can meet our new DPL zack who will have the pleasure to provide the opening talk. Yay! Having said all this, you are more than invited to attend and help. Find more info (and a way to offer help) in the debconf wiki and enjoy more press announcements within the next few weeks. http://wiki.debconf.org/wiki/Miniconf-LT-Berlin/2010 On OFTC:
/join #debian-miniconf-berlin

20 April 2010

Jan Hauke Rahm: VoIP of different quality

Dear lazyweb, I m using VoIP stuff of different kinds already and I actually enjoy it. Thing is, a friend of mine always complained about the quality of sound when speaking with me. He said I should switch the software but I never believed it would make a difference. Well, now I tried and it did. I used ekiga before and now switched to twinkle (which looks uuugly in Gnome at least). What can I say? It really is better. But why? I tried to get more output from twinkle but didn t quite manage. So what is so different? And don t you dare answer codecs or something! I actually don t need details. I just want ekiga to be as good as twinkle sound quality-wise. If you know a solution, tell me! :)

Jan Hauke Rahm: VoIP of different quality

Dear lazyweb, I m using VoIP stuff of different kinds already and I actually enjoy it. Thing is, a friend of mine always complained about the quality of sound when speaking with me. He said I should switch the software but I never believed it would make a difference. Well, now I tried and it did. I used ekiga before and now switched to twinkle (which looks uuugly in Gnome at least). What can I say? It really is better. But why? I tried to get more output from twinkle but didn t quite manage. So what is so different? And don t you dare answer codecs or something! I actually don t need details. I just want ekiga to be as good as twinkle sound quality-wise. If you know a solution, tell me! :)

15 April 2010

Jan Hauke Rahm: MiniDebconf in Berlin, T 8 weeks

To give a short update on where we stand now with the amazing plan of having a Mini Debconf in Berlin this year. There are just 8 weeks left which means there is lots of stuff to do and it needs to be done soon. But luckily Of course, all this is written in the wiki and you can put yourself in it at any time to offer your help! And if you have questions or want to join more real time ;), point your IRC client to OFTC and
/join #debian-miniconf-berlin
Help is still needed with video and audio stuff. If you think you know how to move a camera, or you can even work a sound mixer, get in touch with us. We need a few volunteers to cover the whole two days. Also, more generally help is needed in order to have people to talk to at all times both for speakers and visitors. No special knowledge is necessary although it might prove handy to know what Debian actually is. :) Interested? As a visitor or helper? Anyways, get in touch with us and it s going to be awesome! </commercial>

8 April 2010

Jan Hauke Rahm: 1st german Mini Debconf: it s official

Hi everyone, the usual channels already provided it: we are planning a Mini Debconf in Germany Berlin to be more precise. Yay! So, how is it gonna be? Well, there is the LinuxTag in Berlin which is held every year; this year s calendars show it on June 9th to 12th. As the location is the fairground and room is available, we found setting up a Mini Debconf right in the middle of it to be a good idea. The Mini Debconf will thus take place on June 10th and 11th. The night in between will of course be used, too. The hacklab we re planning will be open from the start until the bitter end without breaks. That of course is only fun if we re there to do something. :-) I sincerely hope that we re in freeze by then and the Bug Squashing Party in the hacklab will do all the best to Make Things Happen[TM]. I m also very pleased to see the german debianforum.de trying to participate. We should sort things out soon. This is a great opportunity for both of us to connect and learn from each other. Well, that s it for now from my side. For more details, in particular on how to help, see our wiki on debconf.org. You ll hear more soon!

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