Search Results: "gwolf"

30 May 2022

Gunnar Wolf: On to the next journey

Last Wednesday my father, Kurt Bernardo Wolf Bogner, took the steps towards his next journey, the last that would start in this life. I cannot put words to this so just sharing this with the world will have to suffice. Goodbye to my teacher, my friend, the person I have always looked up to. Some of his friends were able to put in words more than what I can come up with. If you can read Spanish, you can read the eulogy from the Science Academy of Morelos. His last project, enjoyable by anybody who reads Spanish, is the book with his account of his youth travels Asia, Africa and Europe, beteen 1966 and 1970. You can read it online. And I have many printed copies, in case you want one as well. We will always remember you with love.

18 May 2022

Gunnar Wolf: I do have a full face

I have been a bearded subject since I was 18, back in 1994. Yes, during 1999-2000, I shaved for my military service, and I briefly tried the goatee look in 2008 Few people nowadays can imagine my face without a forest of hair. But sometimes, life happens. And, unlike my good friend Bdale, I didn t get Linus to do the honors But, all in all, here I am: Turns out, I have been suffering from quite bad skin infections for a couple of years already. Last Friday, I checked in to the hospital, with an ugly, swollen face (I won t put you through that), and the hospital staff decided it was in my best interests to trim my beard. And then some more. And then shave me. I sat in the hospital for four days, getting soaked (medical term) with antibiotics and otherstuff, got my recipes for the next few days, and well, I really hope that s the end of the infections. We shall see! So, this is the result of the loving and caring work of three different nurses. Yes, not clean-shaven (I should not trim it further, as shaving blades are a risk of reinfection). Anyway I guess the bits of hair you see over the place will not take too long to become a beard again, even get somewhat respectable. But I thought some of you would like to see the real me PS- Thanks to all who have reached out with good wishes. All is fine!

3 May 2022

Gunnar Wolf: Using a RPi as a display adapter

Almost ten months ago, I mentioned on this blog I bought an ARM laptop, which is now my main machine while away from home a Lenovo Yoga C630 13Q50. Yes, yes, I am still not as much away from home as I used to before, as this pandemic is still somewhat of a thing, but I do move more. My main activity in the outside world with my laptop is teaching. I teach twice a week, and well, having a display for my slides and for showing examples in the terminal and such is a must. However, as I said back in August, one of the hardware support issues for this machine is:
No HDMI support via the USB-C displayport. While I don t expect
to go to conferences or even classes in the next several months,
I hope this can be fixed before I do. It s a potential important
issue for me.
It has sadly not yet been solved While many things have improved since kernel 5.12 (the first I used), the Device Tree does not yet hint at where external video might sit. So, I went to the obvious: Many people carry different kinds of video adaptors I carry a slightly bulky one: A RPi3 For two months already (time flies!), I had an ugly contraption where the RPi3 connected via Ethernet and displayed a VNC client, and my laptop had a VNC server. Oh, but did I mention My laptop works so much better with Wayland than with Xorg that I switched, and am now a happy user of the Sway compositor (a drop-in replacement for the i3 window manager). It is built over WLRoots, which is a great and (relatively) simple project, but will thankfully not carry some of Gnome or KDE s ideas not even those I d rather have. So it took a bit of searching; I was very happy to find WayVNC, a VNC server for wlroot-sbased Wayland compositors. I launched a second Wayland, to be able to have my main session undisturbed and present only a window from it. Only that VNC is slow and laggy, and sometimes awkward. So I kept searching for something better. And something better is, happily, what I was finally able to do! In the laptop, I am using wf-recorder to grab an area of the screen and funnel it into a V4L2 loopback device (which allows it to be used as a camera, solving the main issue with grabbing parts of a Wayland screen):
/usr/bin/wf-recorder -g '0,32 960x540' -t --muxer=v4l2 --codec=rawvideo --pixelformat=yuv420p --file=/dev/video10
(yes, my V4L2Loopback device is set to /dev/video10). You will note I m grabbing a 960 540 rectangle, which is the top of my screen (1920x1080) minus the Waybar. I think I ll increase it to 960 720, as the projector to which I connect the Raspberry has a 4 3 output. After this is sent to /dev/video10, I tell ffmpeg to send it via RTP to the fixed address of the Raspberry:
/usr/bin/ffmpeg -i /dev/video10 -an -f rtp -sdp_file /tmp/video.sdp rtp://10.0.0.100:7000/
Yes, some uglier things happen here. You will note /tmp/video.sdp is created in the laptop itself; this file describes the stream s metadata so it can be used from the client side. I cheated and copied it over to the Raspberry, doing an ugly hardcode along the way:
user@raspi:~ $ cat video.sdp
v=0
o=- 0 0 IN IP4 127.0.0.1
s=No Name
c=IN IP4 10.0.0.100
t=0 0
a=tool:libavformat 58.76.100
m=video 7000 RTP/AVP 96
b=AS:200
a=rtpmap:96 MP4V-ES/90000
a=fmtp:96 profile-level-id=1
People familiar with RTP will scold me: How come I m streaming to the unicast client address? I should do it to an address in the 224.0.0.0 239.0.0.0 range. And it worked, sometimes. I switched over to 10.0.0.100 because it works, basically always Finally, upon bootup, I have configured NoDM to start a session with the user user, and dropped the following in my user s .xsession:
setterm -blank 0 -powersave off -powerdown 0
xset s off
xset -dpms
xset s noblank
mplayer -msglevel all=1 -fs /home/usuario/video.sdp
Anyway, as a result, my students are able to much better follow the pace of my presentation, and I m able to do some tricks better (particularly when it requires quick reaction times, as often happens when dealing with concurrency and such issues). Oh, and of course in case it s of interest to anybody, knowing that SD cards are all but reliable in the long run, I wrote a vmdb2 recipe to build the images. You can grab it here; it requires some local files to be present to be built some are the ones I copied over above, and the other ones are surely of no interest to you (such as my public ssh key or such :-] ) What am I still missing? (read: Can you help me with some ideas? ) Of course, this is a blog post published to brag about my stuff, but also to serve me as persistent memory in case I need to recreate this

7 April 2022

Gunnar Wolf: How is the free firmware for the Raspberry progressing?

Raspberry Pi computers require a piece of non-free software to boot the infamous raspi-firmware package. But for almost as long as there has been a Raspberry Pi to talk of (this year it turns 10 years old!), there have been efforts to get it to boot using only free software. How is it progressing? Michael Bishop (IRC user clever) explained today in the #debian-raspberrypi channel in OFTC that it advances far better than what I expected: It is even possible to boot a usable system under the RPi2 family! Just There is somewhat incomplete hardware support: For his testing, he has managed to use a xfce environment but over the composite (NTSC) video output, as HDMI initialization support is not there. However, he shared with me several interesting links and videos, and I told him I d share them there are still many issues; I do not believe it is currently worth it to make Debian images with this firmware. Before anything else: Go visit the librerpi/lk-overlay repository. Its README outlines hardware support for each of the RPi families; there is a binary build available with nixos if you want to try it out, and instructions to build it. But what clever showed me that made me write this post Is the amount of stuff you can do with the RPi s VPU (why Vision Vector Processing Unit and not the more familiar GPU, Graphical Processing Unit? I don t really know But I trust clever s definitions beyond how I trust my own ) before it loads an opearting system: There s not too much I can add to this. I was just Truly amazed. And I hope to see the remaining hurdles for regular Linux booting on this range of machines with purely free software quickly go away! Packaging this for Debian? Well, not yet not so fast I first told clever we could push this firmware to experimental instead of unstable, as it is not yet ready for most production systems. However, pabs made some spot-on further questions. And yes, it requires installing three(!) different cross-compilers, one of which vc4-toolchain, for the VPU is free software, but not yet upstreamed, and hence is not available for Debian. Anyway, the talk continued long after I had to go. I have gone a bit over the backlog, but I have to leave now so that will be it as for this blog post

21 March 2022

Gunnar Wolf: Long, long, long live Emacs after 39 years

Reading Planet Debian (see, Sam, we are still having a conversation over there? ), I read Anarcat s 20+ years of Emacs. And.. Well, should I brag contribute to the discussion? Of course, why not? Emacs is the first computer program I can name that I ever learnt to use to do something minimally useful. 39 years ago.
From the Space Cadet keyboard that (obviously ) influenced Emacs early design
The Emacs editor was born, according to Wikipedia, in 1976, same year as myself. I am clearly not among its first users. It was already a well-established citizen when I first learnt it; I am fortunate to be the son of a Physics researcher at UNAM, My father used to take me to his institute after he noticed how I was attracted to computers; we would usually spend some hours there between 7 and 11PM on Friday nights. His institute had a computer room where they had very sweet gear: Some 10 Heathkit terminals quite similar to this one: The terminals were connected (via individual switches) to both a PDP-11 and a Foonly F2 computers. The room also had a beautiful thermal printer, a beautiful Tektronix vectorial graphics output terminal, and some other stuff. The main user for my father was to typeset some books; he had recently (1979) published Integral Transforms in Science and Engineering (that must be my first mention in scientific literature), and I remember he was working on the proceedings of a conference he held in Oaxtepec (the account he used in the system was oax, not his usual kbw, which he lent me). He was also working on Manual de Lenguaje y Tipograf a Cient fica en Castellano, where you can see some examples of TeX; due to a hardware crash, the book has the rare privilege of being a direct copy of the output of the thermal printer: It was not possible to produce a higher resolution copy for several years But it is fun and interesting to see what we were able to produce with in-house tools back in 1985! So, what could he teach me so I could use the computers while he worked? TeX, of course. No, no LaTeX (that was published in 1984). LaTeX is a set of macros developed initially by Leslie Lamport, used to make TeX easier; TeX was developed by Donald Knuth, and if I have this information correct, it was Knuth himself who installed and demonstrated TeX in the Foonly computer, during a visit to UNAM. Now, after 39 years hammering at Emacs buffers Have I grown extra fingers? Nope. I cannot even write decent elisp code, and can barely read it. I do use org-mode (a lot!) and love it; I have written basically five books, many articles and lots of presentations and minor documents with it. But I don t read my mail or handle my git from Emacs. I could say, I m a relatively newbie after almost four decades. Four decades When we got a PC in 1986, my father got the people at the Institute to get him memacs (micro-emacs). There was probably a ten year period I barely used any emacs, but always recognized it. My fingers hve memorized a dozen or so movement commands, and a similar number of file management commands. And yes, Emacs and TeX are still the main tools I use day to day.

17 March 2022

Gunnar Wolf: Speaking about the OpenPGP WoT on LibrePlanet this Saturday

So, LibrePlanet, the FSF s conference, is coming! I much enjoyed attending this conference in person in March 2018. This year I submitted a talk again, and it got accepted of course, given the conference is still 100% online, I doubt I will be able to go 100% conference-mode (I hope to catch a couple of other talks, but well, we are all eager to go back to how things were before 2020!)

Anyway, what is my talk about? My talk is titled Current challenges for the OpenPGP keyserver network. Is there a way forward?. The abstract I submitted follows:
Many free projects use OpenPGP encryption or signatures for various important tasks, like defining membership, authenticating participation, asserting identity over a vote, etc. The Web-of-Trust upon which its operation is based is a model many of us hold dear, allowing for a decentralized way to assign trust to the identity of a given person. But both the Web-of-Trust model and the software that serves as a basis for the above mentioned uses are at risk due to attacks on the key distribution protocol (not on the software itself!) With this talk, I will try to bring awareness to this situation, to some possible mitigations, and present some proposals to allow for the decentralized model to continue to thrive towards the future.
I am on the third semester of my PhD, trying to somehow keep a decentralized infrastructure for the OpenPGP Web of Trust viable and usable for the future. While this is still in the early stages of my PhD work (and I still don t have a solution to present), I will talk about what the main problems are and will sketch out the path I intend to develop. What is the relevance? Mainly, I think, that many free software projects use the OpenPGP Web of Trust for their identity definitions Are we anachronistic? Are we using tools unfit for this century? I don t think so. I think we are in time to fix the main sore spots for this great example of a decentralized infrastructure.

When is my talk scheduled? This Saturday, 2022.03.19, at
GMT / UTC time
19:25 20:10
Conference schedule time (EDT/GMT-4)
15:25 16:10
Mexico City time (GMT-6)
13:25 14:10

How to watch it? The streams are open online. I will be talking in the Saturn room, feel free to just appear there and watch! The FSF asks people to [register for the conference](https://my.fsf.org/civicrm/event/info?reset=1&id=99) beforehand, in order to be able to have an active participation (i.e. ask questions and that). Of course, you might be interested in other talks take a look at the schedule! LibrePlanet keeps a video archive of their past conferences, and this talk will be linked from there. Of course, I will link to the recording once it is online. Update: As of 2022.03.30, LibrePlanet has posted the videos for all of their talks, all linked from the program. And of course, for convenience, I copied the talk over here: Current challenges for the OpenPGP keyserver network. Is there a way forward?

13 February 2022

Gunnar Wolf: Got to boot a RPi Zero 2 W with Debian

About a month ago, I got tired of waiting for the newest member of the Raspberry product lineup to be sold in Mexico, and I bought it from a Chinese reseller through a big online shopping platform. I paid quite a bit of premium (~US$85 instead of the advertised US$15), and got it delivered ten days later Anyway, it s known this machine does not yet boot mainline Linux. The vast majority of ARM systems require the bootloader to load a Device Tree file, presenting the hardware characteristics map. And while the RPi Zero 2 W (hey what an awful and confusing naming scheme they chose!) is mostly similar to a RPi3B+, it is not quite the same thing. A kernel with RPi3B+ s device tree will refuse to boot. Anyway, I started digging, and found that some days ago Stephan Wahren sent a patch to the linux-arm-kernel mailing list with a matching device tree. Read the patch! It s quite simple to read (what is harder is to know where each declaration should go, if you want to write your own, of course). It basically includes all basic details for the main chip in the RPi3 family (BCM2837), pulls in also the declarations from the BCM2836 present in the RPi2, and adds the necessary bits for the USB OTG connection and the WiFi and Bluetooth declarations. Registers the model name as Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W, which you can easily see in the following photo, informs the kernel it has 512MB RAM, and Well, really, it s an easy device tree to read, don t be shy! So, I booted my RPi 3B+ with a freshly downloaded Bookworm image, installed and unpacked linux-source-5.15, applied Stephan s patch, and added the following for the DTB to be generated in the arm64 tree as well:
--- /dev/null   2022-01-26 23:35:40.747999998 +0000
+++ arch/arm64/boot/dts/broadcom/bcm2837-rpi-zero-2-w.dts       2022-02-13 06:28:29.968429953 +0000
@@ -0,0 +1 @@
+#include "arm/bcm2837-rpi-zero-2-w.dts"
Then, ran a simple make dtbs, and Failed, because bcm283x-rpi-wifi-bt.dtsi is not yet in the kernel . OK, no worries: Getting wireless to work is a later step. I commented out the lines causing conflict (10, 33-35, 134-136), and:
root@rpi3-20220212:/usr/src/linux-source-5.15# make dtbs
  DTC     arch/arm64/boot/dts/broadcom/bcm2837-rpi-zero-2-w.dtb
Great! Just copied over that generated file to /boot/firmware/, moved the SD over to my RPiZ2W, and behold! It boots! When I bragged about it in #debian-raspberrypi, steev suggested me to pull in the WiFi patch, that has also been submitted (but not yet accepted) for kernel inclusion. I did so, uncommented the lines I modified, and built again. It builds correctly, and again copied the DTB over. It still does not find the WiFi; dmesg still complains about a missing bit of firmware (failed to load brcm/brcmfmac43430b0-sdio.raspberrypi,model-zero-2-w.bin). Steev pointed out it can be downloaded from RPi Distro s GitHub page, but I called it a night and didn t pursue it any further ;-) So I understand this post is still a far cry from saying our images properly boot under a RPi 0 2 W , but we will get there

26 January 2022

Gunnar Wolf: Progvis Now in Debian proper! (unstable)

Progvis finally made it into Debian! What is it, you ask? It is a great tool to teach about memory management and concurrency. I first saw progvis in the poster presentation his author, Filip Str mb ck, did last year at the 52nd ACM Technical Sympossium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE), immediately recognizing it as a tool I wanted to use at my classes, and being it free software, make it available for all interested Debian users. Quoting from Progvis Web page:
This is a program visualization tool aimed at concurrent programs and related issues. The tool itself is mostly language agnostic, and relies on Storm to compile the provided code and provide basic debug information. The generated code is then inspected and instrumented to provide an experience similar to a basic debugger. The tool emphasizes a visual representation of the object hierarchy that is manipulated by the executed program to make it easy to understand how it looks. In particular, a visual representation is beneficial over a text representation since it makes it easier to find shared data that might need to be synchronized in a concurrent program. As mentioned, the tool is aimed at concurrent programs. Therefore, it allows spawning multiple threads running the same program to see if that affects the program s execution (this is mostly interesting if global variables are used). Furthermore, any spawned threads also appear in the tool, and the user may control them independently to explore possible race conditions or other synchronization errors. If enabled from the menu bar, the tool keeps track of reads and writes to the data structure in order to highlight basic race conditions in addition to deadlocks.
So, what is this Storm thing? Filip promptly informed me that Progvis is not just a pedagogical tool Or rather, that it is part of something bigger. Progvis is a program built using the Storm programming language platform is more than a compiler; it presents as a framework for creating languages, designed to make easy to implement languages that can be extended with new syntax and semantics. Storm is much more than what I have explored, and can be used as an interactive compiler, a language server used as a service for highlighting and completing in IDEs. But I won t dig much more into Storm (which is, of course, now also available in Debian as well as the libraries built from the same source). Back to progvis: It implements a very-close-to-C++ language, with some details to better suit its purpose (i.e. instead of using the usual pthread implementation, an own thread model is used; i.e. thread creation is handled via int thread_id = thread_name(funcname, &params) instead of the more complex pthread_create() function (including details such as the thread object being passed as by reference as a parameter) All in all, while I have not yet taken full advantage of this tool in my teaching, it has helped me show somewhat hard to grasp concepts such as: All in all, a great tool. I hope you find it useful and enjoyable as well! PS- I suggest you to install the progvis-examples package to get started. You will find some dozens of sample programs in /usr/share/doc/progvis-examples/examples; playing with them will help you better understand the tool and be able to better write your own programs.

19 November 2021

Gunnar Wolf: For our millionth bug, bookworms eat raspberries alive

I guess you already heard, right? The Debian Bug Tracking System has hit a big milestone! We just passed our one millionth bug report! (and yes, that s a cause for celebration; bug reporting is probably the best way for the system to grow and improve) So, to celebrate, I want to announce I have nudged our unofficial Raspberry Pi images build scripts to now also build images for our upcoming Debian release, Debian 12 Bookworm (image above: A bookworm learns about raspberries in various stages of testing. Image sources: Transformers Wiki, CC BY-SA and Sam Saunders at Flickr, CC BY-SA) So Get em while they are fresh! https://raspi.debian.net/! And enjoy the following (non-book)worm-on-a-raspberry picture from Wikimedia Commons: Oh, FWIW The site still shows images for Buster. You will notice they are no longer being autobuilt (why spend CPU time in something that s no longer going to change significatively?). The Bookworm images are not yet tested; as soon as I can test them, I will drop the Buster ones.

18 October 2021

Gunnar Wolf: raspi.debian.net now hosted on Debian infrastructure

So, since I registered the URL for serving the unofficial Debian images for the Raspberry computers, raspi.debian.net, in April 2020, I had been hosting it in my Dreamhost webspace. Over two years ago yes, before I finished setting it up in Dreamhost Steve McIntyre approached me and invited me to host the images under the Debian cdimages user group. I told him I d first just get the setup running, and later I would approach him for finalizing the setup. Then, I set up the build on my own server, hosted on my Dreamhost account and forgot about it for many months. Last month, there was a not particularly happy flamewar in debian-arm@lists.debian.org finished with me stating I would be moving the hosting to Debian infrastructure soon. Well It took me a bit over a month to get this sorted out, together with several days of half-broken links, but it is finally done: raspi.debian.net is a CNAME for ftp.acc.umu.se, which is the same system that hosts cdimage.debian.org. And, of course it is also reachable as https://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/unofficial/raspi/ looks more official, but is less memorable Thanks a lot to Steve for the nudging, and to maswan to help finalizing the setup. What next? Well, the images are being built on my server. I d love to move the builder over to Debian machines as well. When? How? That s still in the air.

22 September 2021

Gunnar Wolf: New book out! Mecanismos de privacidad y anonimato en redes, una visi n transdisciplinaria

Three years ago, I organized a fun and most interesting colloquium at Facultad de Ingenier a, UNAM about privacy and anonymity online. I would have loved to share this earlier with the world, but The university s processes are quite slow (and, to be fair, I also took quite a bit of time to push things through). But today, I m finally happy to share the result of that work with all of you. We managed to get 11 of the talks in the colloquium as articles. The back-cover text reads (in Spanish):
We live in an era where human to human interactions are more and more often mediated by technology. This, of course, means everything leaves a digital trail, a trail that can follow and us relentlessly. Privacy is recognized, however, as a human right although one that is under growing threats. Anonymity is the best tool to secure it. Throughout history, clear steps have been taken legally, technically and technologically to defend it. Various studies point out this is not only a known issue for the network's users, but that a large majority has searched for alternatives to protect their communications' privacy. This book stems from a colloquium held by *Laboratorio de Investigaci n y Desarrollo de Software Libre* (LIDSOL) of Facultad de Ingenier a, UNAM, towards the end of 2018, where we invited experts from disciplines so far apart as law and systems development, psychology and economics, to contribute with their experiences to a transdisciplinary vision.
If this interests you, you can get the book at our institutional repository. Oh, and What about the birds? In Spanish (Mexican only?), we have a saying, hay p jaros en el alambre , meaning watch your words, as uninvited people might be listening, as birds resting over the wires over which phone calls used to be made (back in the day where wiretapping was that easy). I found the design proposed by our editor ingenious and very fitting for our topic!

14 August 2021

Gunnar Wolf: Bullseye arrives. Private ARM64 install fest!

So today is the day when a new Debian release comes out! Congratulations to everybody, and thanks a lot mainly to the Release Team. Lots of very hard work was put into making Debian 11 Bullseye a reality! My very personal way to celebrate this was to do a somewhat different Debian install at home. Why different? Well, I have quite a bit of old, older and frankly elderly laptops at home. And as many of you know, I have done more than my fair share of Raspberry Pi installs I have played and worked with assorted ARM machines at least since 2013, and I cannot consider myself a newbie with them by any means. But this is the first time I installed Debian on a mass-market, decently-specced ARM64-based laptop. Yes, I know the Pinebook has been there like for ages, but it really does feel like a computer to show off and not to use seriously (and I ve seen probably too many people fiddling with it, unable to get $foo to work). So I got myself a used Lenovo Yoga C630. Yes, a discontinued product it seems Lenovo was not able to properly market this machine, and it had a pretty short shelf life the machine was available for samples in late 2018 and for general sale in 2019! The specs are quite decent: Installing it via an almost-standard debian-installer is almost straightforward does require the installer to know what he is doing but is not too different from a regular Debian install. The AArch64 laptops project has done quite a feat in getting a d-i image ready to be inserted as a USB drive, and comprehensive instructions to help through the process. The shipped scripts even reap the Windows partition for the firmware images! I have reduced Windows to 25GB, but having only a 128GB drive, it still is a little bit too much.. I guess I ll blow it away sooner rather than later. The installer image has a regular GNOME install, which works beautifully, but I promptly replaced it with i3, as it s fundamental for me to work happily. Of course, the computer has quirks, more than I d expect from a regular x86 system, but well within what I expected to achieve during my first day with it. The issues I have most noted are: Of course, more quirks will surely appear with use. And I ll start trying to address some of them. So Happy Bullseye! Happy Debian 11! Enjoy a great release! \o/

18 June 2021

Gunnar Wolf: Fighting spam on roundcube with modsecurity

Every couple of months, one of my users falls prey to phishing attacks, and send their login/password data to an unknown somebody who poses as Well, as me, their always-friendly and always-helpful systems administrator. What follows is, of course, me spending a week trying to get our systems out of all of the RBLs/DNSBLs. But, no matter how fast I act, there s always distruption and lost mails (bounced or classified as spam) for my users. Most of my users use the Webmail I have configured on our institute s servers, Roundcube, for which I have the highest appreciation. Only that Of course, when a user yields their username and password to an attacker, it is very successful at Sending huge amounts of unrequested mail, leading to my server losing its reputation This week, I set two bits of mitigation strategies. The first one, most straightforward, was to ask Roundcube to disallow sending mails with over ten recipients. In a Debian install, this is as easy as setting up the following variable in /etc/roundcube/config.inc.php:
$config['max_recipients'] = 10
However, a dilligent spammer can still clog the server by sending many, many, many, many requests maybe each of them with ten recipients only; last weekend, I got a new mail every three seconds or so. Adding rate limit to a specific Roundcube action is not easy, however, or at least it took me quite a bit of headbanging to get it right . Roundcube is a very AJAX-y system where all (most, at least) actions are received by /index.php and there is quite a bit of parsing to do to understand the actions done. When sending a mail, of course, it is done using the POST HTTP verb, and the URI-specified variables include _task=mail&_unlock=loading<message_id> (of course, with changing message IDs). After some poking here and there, I faced to SpiderLabs ModSecurity Only that I am not yet well versed in writing rules for it. But after quite a bit of reading, poking, breaking I was able to come up with the following rules:
# How often does the limit counter expire   ratelimit_client=60,
# every 60 seconds
SecRule REQUEST_LINE "@rx POST.*_task=mail&_unlock" id:10,phase:2,nolog,pass,setuid:% tx.ua_hash ,setvar:user.ratelimit_client=+1,expirevar:user.ratelimit_client=60
# How many requests do we allow in the specified time period?  
# @gt 3, 3 requests
SecRule user:ratelimit_client "@gt 2" chain,id:100009,phase:2,deny,status:429,setenv:RATELIMITED,log,msg:RATE-LIMITED
SecRule REQUEST_LINE "@rx POST.*_task=mail&_unlock"
The first line specifies the rule will match request lines specifying the POST verb aind including the _task=mail&_unlock fragment in the URL. It increments tht ratelimit_client user variable, but expires it after 60 seconds. The first line verifies whether the above specified variable (do note that it s user: instead of user.) is greater than 2. If so, it sets the deny action, HTTP return status of 429 (Too Many Requests), and logs the reason why this request was denied (rate-limited). And Given the way Roundcube works, this even works transparently! If a user hits the limit, the mail sending component will just wait and, after a while, time out. Then, the user can click Send again. If legitimate users are too productive and try to send over three mails in a minute, they won t lose any of it; spammers will (hopefully!) find it unbearably slow and give up. Logging is quite informative; I will probably later restrict it to show fewer parts (even if just for privacy sake, as it logs the full request!) For a complex permissions framework such as mod_security, having information such as the following is most welcome in order to find a possibly misbehaving rule:
--76659f4b-H--
Message: Access denied with code 429 (phase 2). Pattern match "POST.*_task=mail&_unlock" at REQUEST_LINE. [file "/etc/modsecurity/rate_limit_sender.conf"] [line "20"] [id "100009"] [msg "RATELIMITED BOT"]
Apache-Error: [file "apache2_util.c"] [line 273] [level 3] [client 192.168.1.48] ModSecurity: Access denied with code 429 (phase 2). Pattern match "POST.*_task=mail&_unlock" at REQUEST_LINE. [file "/etc/modsecurity/rate_limit_sender.conf"] [line "20"] [id "100009"] [msg "RATELIMITED BOT"] [hostname "my.server.mx"] [uri "/roundcube/"] [unique_id "YMzJLR9jVDMGsG@18kB1qAAAAAY"]
Action: Intercepted (phase 2)
Stopwatch: 1624033581838813 1204 (- - -)
Stopwatch2: 1624033581838813 1204; combined=352, p1=29, p2=140, p3=0, p4=0, p5=94, sr=81, sw=89, l=0, gc=0
Response-Body-Transformed: Dechunked
Producer: ModSecurity for Apache/2.9.3 (http://www.modsecurity.org/).
Server: Apache
WebApp-Info: "default" "-" ""
Engine-Mode: "ENABLED"
I truly, truly hope this is the last time my server falls in the black pits of DNSBL/RBL lists

24 April 2021

Gunnar Wolf: FLISOL Talking about Jitsi

Every year since 2005 there is a very good, big and interesting Latin American gathering of free-software-minded people. Of course, Latin America is a big, big, big place, and it s not like we are the most economically buoyant region to meet in something equiparable to FOSDEM. What we have is a distributed free software conference originally, a distributed Linux install-fest (which I never liked, I am against install-fests), but gradually it morphed into a proper conference: Festival Latinoamericano de Instalaci n de Software Libre (Latin American Free Software Installation Festival) This FLISOL was hosted by the always great and always interesting Rancho Electr nico, our favorite local hacklab, and has many other interesting talks. I like talking about projects where I am involved as a developer but this time I decided to do otherwise: I presented a talk on the Jitsi videoconferencing server. Why? Because of the relevance videoconferences have had over the last year. So, without further ado Here is a video I recorded locally from the talk I gave (MKV), as well as the slides (PDF).

31 March 2021

Gunnar Wolf: And what does the FSF have, anyway?

Following up with my previous post, it seems the FSF s board is taking good care of undermining the FSF itself. Over few days, it has: Now Many people have pointed to the fact that the FSF has been a sort of a moral leader pushing free software awareness But if they lose their moral statre, what s in there? What power do they bear? Why do we care? And the answer, at least one of them, is simple and strong. The General Public License (GPL), both in its v2 and v3 revisions, read:
Each version is given a distinguishing version number.  If the
Program specifies that a certain numbered version of the GNU General
Public License "or any later version" applies to it, you have the
option of following the terms and conditions either of that numbered
version or of any later version published by the Free Software
Foundation.  If the Program does not specify a version number of the
GNU General Public License, you may choose any version ever published
by the Free Software Foundation.
Years ago there was a huge argument on why Linux was licensed as GPLv2 only, without the option to relicense under GPLv3. Of course, by then, Linux had had thousands of authors, and they would all have to agree to change license so it would have been impossible even if it were wanted. But yes, some people decried several terms of GPLv3 not being aligned with their views of freedom. Well, so if the FSF board manages to have it their way, and get everybody mark them as irrelevant, they will still be the stewards of the GPL. Thousands of projects are licensed under the GPL v2 or v3 or later . Will we continue to trust the FSF s stewardship, if it just becomes a board of big egos, with no respect of what happens in the free software ecosystem? My suggestion is, for all project copyright holders that are in a position to do so, to drop the or-later terms and stick to a single, known GPL version.

23 March 2021

Gunnar Wolf: Regarding the Stallman comeback

Context:
  1. Richard Stallman is the founder of the Free Software movement, and commited his life to making what seemed like a ludicrous idea into a tangible reality. We owe him big time for that, and nothing somebody says or does will ever eclipse the fact.
  2. But Richard Stallman has a very toxic personality. There is a long, well-known published list of abuse cases; if you must read more into it, some regarding his views on sex, consent, gender, and some other issues are published as a part of the open letter I am about to reference. I have witnessed quite a few; I won t disclose here the details, as many other incidents are already known. And I don t mean by this sexual abuse, although that s the twig that eventually broke the camel s back, but ranging from general rudeness to absolute lack of consideration for people around him.
  3. In September 2019, Stallman was Forced to resign, first from his position at MIT, then as the president of the FSF. The direct cause was a comment where he defended the accusations on Minsky (a personal friend of his, and deceased three years prior to the fact) of sexual abuse.
  4. Last week, 18 months after he was driven out of the FSF, and at LibrePlanet (FSF s signature conference, usually held at the MIT, this time naturally online only) Stallman announced his comeback to the Board of Directors of the FSF.
Many people (me included, naturally) in the Free Software world are very angry about this announcement. There is a call for signatures for a position statement presented by several free software leaders that has gathered, as I write this message, over 400 signatures. The Open Source Initiative has presented its institutional position statement. And I can only forecast this rejection will continue to grow. Free software was once the arena of young, raging alpha machos where a thick skin was an entry requirement. A good thing about growing up is that our community is now wiser, and although it still attracts younger people, there is a clear trend not to repeat our past ways. Free software has grown, and there is no place for a leader so disrespectful and hurting as many of us have witnessed Stallman to be. Again, the free software movement and the world as a whole owes a great deal to Stallman. He changed history. I admire his work, his persistence and his stubbornness. But I won t have him represent me.

4 March 2021

Gunnar Wolf: The power of EIDE

I am quite happy with the Raspberry tower I bought for keeping my Raspberries organized. Clustering them? No, not by a long shot. I just want to quickly know where they all are, and at a glance, be able to know which one I will work with. Bottom drawer has a RPi1B, second one has a RPi2, next comes a 3B+, and the top two ones are RPi4 (4 and 8GB). That allows me for quick testing of stuff. Yes, I am tempted to get the top one out of the array and use it in production but as it stands, that s the layout. My only quip with this? Serial console access. Connecting and releasing the three tiny cables (no, the red one is not required it provides +5V power, but it s not enough to power over USB more than the earliest RPis) with my big, fat and numb fingers Always takes a minute or three. Until I thought of the obvious: Why not connect the RPi headers to an old EIDE cable? They are of the same dimensions, and much more practical to connect and yank! with that interface expansion in place, I will be able to easily connect my console cables Or even more, I can put on a serious electronic look on my face, take out my soldering iro ehem my very small breadboard for those with limited abilities, and look more interesting! In fact, I am almost sure I can get these two little buggers to blink interestingly when bytes come and go to my RPis! I will finally gain a bit of self-respect as an electronic tinkerer! (yes, yes, I enjoy playing with RPis, but I treat them as Well Computers. I don t do interfacing to the real world, although I m sure it can be fun) What stopped me from doing so? Pin 20 of the EIDE specification. As a service to clumsy computer repairers such as myself, the standard specifies pin 20 is not to carry any signals, and the drive headers are to ship it cut (Key, pin missing), so that together with the notch on the outer part of the bracket inserting the cable upside down is physically impossible. So no, I m not able to finish the project with pieces at hand. I even went to two nearby electronic shops yesterday when I took my dog out for a walk, and could not find it there either So I ended up buying what appears to be a sweet, cheap product covering my needs from our corporate capitalist overlords.

21 February 2021

Enrico Zini: Software development links

Next time we'll iterate on Himblick design and development, Raspberry Pi 4 can now run plain standard Debian, which should make a lot of things easier and cleaner when developing products based on it. Somewhat related to nspawn-runner, random links somehow related to my feeling that nspawn comes from an ecosystem which gives me a bigger sense of focus on security and solidity than Docker: I did a lot of work on A38, a Python library to deal with FatturaPA electronic invoicing, and it was a wonderful surprise to see a positive review spontaneously appear! : Fattura elettronica, come visualizzarla con python TuttoLogico A beautiful, hands-on explanation of git internals, as a step by step guide to reimplementing your own git: Git Internals - Learn by Building Your Own Git I recently tried meson and liked it a lot. I then gave unity builds a try, since it supports them out of the box, and found myself with doubts. I found I wasn't alone, and I liked The Evils of Unity Builds as a summary of the situation. A point of view I liked on technological debt: Technical debt as a lack of understanding Finally, a classic, and a masterful explanation for a question that keeps popping up: RegEx match open tags except XHTML self-contained tags

9 February 2021

Gunnar Wolf: And now, Bullseye images are also built for the RPi

Public service announcement In case you want to run our latest release (still cooking, of course) in your Raspberries I have enabled builds for both Debian 10 (Stable, Buster) and Debian 11 (Testing, Bullseye). Go grab it! Oh Yes, we are currently failing the builds of ARM64 (RPi3 and RPi4) Something due to python3-minimal unwilling to get installed right. But that should be fixed soon! Can you help us? Take a look at the [build log for RPi3, Bullseye](https://raspi.debian.net/daily/raspi_3_bullseye.log), or just focus on the step where it breaks It seems to have been fixed, woohoo!:
Setting up python3-minimal (3.9.1-1) ...
2021-02-09 08:56:38 DEBUG STDERR: E: Can not write log (Is /dev/pts mounted?) - posix_openpt (19: No such device)
Segmentation fault
dpkg: error processing package python3-minimal (--configure):
 installed python3-minimal package post-installation script subprocess returned error exit status 139
Errors were encountered while processing:
 python3-minimal
E: Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1)
Anyway, as you can see, the eight built images work fine and are tested, at least, for basic support!

26 January 2021

Gunnar Wolf: Back to school... As a student

Although it was a much larger step when I made a similar announcement seven years ago, when I started my Specialization, it is still a big challenge ahead, and I am very happy to pursue this: I have been admitted to a PhD program at UNAM, the university I have worked at for almost 20 years, and one of the top universities in Latin America. What program will I be part of? Doctorado en Ciencia e Ingenier a de la Computaci n (Computer Science and Engineering Doctorate Quite a broad program name, yes, sounds like anything goes). I am happy to say I managed to do as I hoped seven years ago. As that blog post says, I managed to keep an eye on my keyring-maint duties as well Will even try to link that work with what I do at school. Over the years I spent pursuing my Specialization and Masters degrees at IPN ESIME, I managed to publish two academic papers on the keyring-maint work: Strengthening a Curated Web of Trust in a Geographically Distributed Project and Insights on the large-scale deployment of a curated Web-of-Trust: the Debian project s cryptographic keyring. Since that time, several relevant things have happened. Mainly, the SKS Keyserver panorama started looking quite bleak: Various attacks such as the poisoned certificates or *certificate flooding have been mounted against the keyserver network, having as a direct outcome the questioning of the future of the decentralized transitional trust model we take for granted in the OpenPGP world. The global SKS keyserver network has quickly eroded, and its continued functioning is no longer something we can take as a given. Different methods have come up, attempting to answer to this situation, such as WKD and DANE, but they all lose something that can be seen as the essence, almost the heart of the distributed, decentralized Web-of-Trust paradigm: The ability to carry the full certificates for the keys. And that s the problem I will try to tackle with my work: How can we, in the light of the known weaknesses, keep a working, decentralized, distributed trust scheme?

Next.