Search Results: "francisco"

1 September 2022

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities August 2022

Focus This month I didn't have any particular focus. I just worked on issues in my info bubble.

Changes

Issues

Debugging
  • Did extensive debugging on a libpst issue but failed to figure out the cause of the issue. Seems to be related to a change to freopen in glibc that fixed compatibility with POSIX.

Review
  • FOSSjobs: approved postings
  • Spam: reported 5 Debian bug reports and 23 Debian mailing list posts
  • Debian packages: sponsored psi-notify (twice)
  • Debian wiki: RecentChanges for the month
  • Debian BTS usertags: changes for the month
  • Debian screenshots:
    • approved bible-kjv edb-debugger lifeograph links mu-editor unattended-upgrades
    • rejected apt-listchanges/apt-listdifferences (semi-related log file), steam-devices (package description), myspell-es/lighttpd (selfie), fraqtive (Windows), wireguard (logo), kde-telepathy-contact-list (mobile hacking app)

Administration
  • Debian BTS: unarchive/reopen/triage bugs for reintroduced packages orage, scap-security-guide, libdatetime-format-datemanip-perl
  • Debian IRC: disable anti-spam channel modes for some channels
  • Debian servers: investigate full filesystems
  • Debian wiki: unblock IP addresses, approve accounts, ping accounts with bouncing email

Communication
  • Respond to queries from Debian users and contributors on the mailing lists and IRC.

Sponsors The sptag, libpst, purple-discord, circuitbreaker work was sponsored. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

27 July 2022

Vincent Bernat: ClickHouse SF Bay Area Meetup: Akvorado

Here are the slides I presented for a ClickHouse SF Bay Area Meetup in July 2022, hosted by Altinity. They are about Akvorado, a network flow collector and visualizer, and notably on how it relies on ClickHouse, a column-oriented database.
The meetup was recorded and available on YouTube. Here is the part relevant to my presentation, with subtitles:1
I got a few questions about how to get information from the higher layers, like HTTP. As my use case for Akvorado was at the network edge, my answers were mostly negative. However, as sFlow is extensible, when collecting flows from Linux servers instead, you could embed additional data and they could be exported as well. I also got a question about doing aggregation in a single table. ClickHouse can aggregate automatically data using TTL. My answer for not doing that is partial. There is another reason: the retention periods of the various tables may overlap. For example, the main table keeps data for 15 days, but even in these 15 days, if I do a query on a 12-hour window, it is faster to use the flows_1m0s aggregated table, unless I request something about ports and IP addresses.

  1. To generate the subtitles, I have used Amazon Transcribe, the speech-to-text solution from Amazon AWS. Unfortunately, there is no en-FR language available, which would have been useful for my terrible accent. While the subtitles were 100% accurate when the host, Robert Hodge from Altinity, was speaking, the success rate on my talk was quite lower. I had to rewrite almost all sentences. However, using speech-to-text is still useful to get the timings, as it is also something requiring a lot of work to do manually.

27 June 2022

Russ Allbery: Review: Light from Uncommon Stars

Review: Light from Uncommon Stars, by Ryka Aoki
Publisher: Tor
Copyright: 2021
ISBN: 1-250-78907-9
Format: Kindle
Pages: 371
Katrina Nguyen is an young abused transgender woman. As the story opens, she's preparing to run away from home. Her escape bag is packed with meds, clothes, her papers, and her violin. The note she is leaving for her parents says that she's going to San Francisco, a plausible lie. Her actual destination is Los Angeles, specifically the San Gabriel Valley, where a man she met at a queer youth conference said he'd give her a place to sleep. Shizuka Satomi is the Queen of Hell, the legendary uncompromising violin teacher responsible for six previous superstars, at least within the limited world of classical music. She's wealthy, abrasive, demanding, and intimidating, and unbeknownst to the rest of the world she has made a literal bargain with Hell. She has to deliver seven souls, seven violin players who want something badly enough that they'll bargain with Hell to get it. Six have already been delivered in spectacular fashion, but she's running out of time to deliver the seventh before her own soul is forfeit. Tamiko Grohl, an up-and-coming violinist from her native Los Angeles, will hopefully be the seventh. Lan Tran is a refugee and matriarch of a family who runs Starrgate Donut. She and her family didn't flee another unstable or inhospitable country. They fled the collapsing Galactic Empire, securing their travel authorization by promising to set up a tourism attraction. Meanwhile, she's careful to give cops free donuts and to keep their advanced technology carefully concealed. The opening of this book is unlikely to be a surprise in general shape. Most readers would expect Katrina to end up as Satomi's student rather than Tamiko, and indeed she does, although not before Katrina has a very difficult time. Near the start of the novel, I thought "oh, this is going to be hurt/comfort without a romantic relationship," and it is. But it then goes beyond that start into a multifaceted story about complexity, resilience, and how people support each other. It is also a fantastic look at the nuance and intricacies of being or supporting a transgender person, vividly illustrated by a story full of characters the reader cares about and without the academic abstruseness that often gets in the way. The problems with gender-blindness, the limitations of honoring someone's gender without understanding how other people do not, the trickiness of privilege, gender policing as a distraction and alienation from the rest of one's life, the complications of real human bodies and dysmorphia, the importance of listening to another person rather than one's assumptions about how that person feels it's all in here, flowing naturally from the story, specific to the characters involved, and never belabored. I cannot express how well-handled this is. It was a delight to read. The other wonderful thing Aoki does is set Satomi up as the almost supernaturally competent teacher who in a sense "rescues" Katrina, and then invert the trope, showing the limits of Satomi's expertise, the places where she desperately needs human connection for herself, and her struggle to understand Katrina well enough to teach her at the level Satomi expects of herself. Teaching is not one thing to everyone; it's about listening, and Katrina is nothing like Satomi's other students. This novel is full of people thinking they finally understand each other and realizing there is still more depth that they had missed, and then talking through the gap like adults. As you can tell from any summary of this book, it's an odd genre mash-up. The fantasy part is a classic "magician sells her soul to Hell" story; there are a few twists, but it largely follows genre expectations. The science fiction part involving Lan is unfortunately weaker and feels more like a random assortment of borrowed Star Trek tropes than coherent world-building. Genre readers should not come to this story expecting a well-thought-out science fiction universe or a serious attempt to reconcile metaphysics between the fantasy and science fiction backgrounds. It's a quirky assortment of parts that don't normally go together, defy easy classification, and are often unexplained. I suspect this was intentional on Aoki's part given how deeply this book is about the experience of being transgender. Of the three primary viewpoint characters, I thought Lan's perspective was the weakest, and not just because of her somewhat generic SF background. Aoki uses her as a way to talk about the refugee experience, describing her as a woman who brings her family out of danger to build a new life. This mostly works, but Lan has vastly more power and capabilities than a refugee would normally have. Rather than the typical Asian refugee experience in the San Gabriel valley, Lan is more akin to a US multimillionaire who for some reason fled to Vietnam (relative to those around her, Lan is arguably even more wealthy than that). This is also a refugee experience, but it is an incredibly privileged one in a way that partly undermines the role that she plays in the story. Another false note bothered me more: I thought Tamiko was treated horribly in this story. She plays a quite minor role, sidelined early in the novel and appearing only briefly near the climax, and she's portrayed quite negatively, but she's clearly hurting as deeply as the protagonists of this novel. Aoki gives her a moment of redemption, but Tamiko gets nothing from it. Unlike every other injured and abused character in this story, no one is there for Tamiko and no one ever attempts to understand her. I found that profoundly sad. She's not an admirable character, but neither is Satomi at the start of the book. At least a gesture at a future for Tamiko would have been appreciated. Those two complaints aside, though, I could not put this book down. I was able to predict the broad outline of the plot, but the specifics were so good and so true to characters. Both the primary and supporting cast are unique, unpredictable, and memorable. Light from Uncommon Stars has a complex relationship with genre. It is squarely in the speculative fiction genre; the plot would not work without the fantasy and (more arguably) the science fiction elements. Music is magical in a way that goes beyond what can be attributed to metaphor and subjectivity. But it's also primarily character story deeply rooted in the specific location of the San Gabriel valley east of Los Angeles, full of vivid descriptions (particularly of food) and day-to-day life. As with the fantasy and science fiction elements, Aoki does not try to meld the genre elements into a coherent whole. She lets them sit side by side and be awkward and charming and uneven and chaotic. If you're the sort of SF reader who likes building a coherent theory of world-building rules, you may have to turn that desire off to fully enjoy this book. I thought this book was great. It's not flawless, but like its characters it's not trying to be flawless. In places it is deeply insightful and heartbreakingly emotional; in others, it's a glorious mess. It's full of cooking and food, YouTube fame, the disappointments of replicators, video game music, meet-cutes over donuts, found family, and classical music drama. I wish we'd gotten way more about the violin repair shop and a bit less warmed-over Star Trek, but I also loved it exactly the way it was. Definitely the best of the 2022 Hugo nominees that I've read so far. Content warning for child abuse, rape, self-harm, and somewhat explicit sex work. The start of the book is rather heavy and horrific, although the author advertises fairly clearly (and accurately) that things will get better. Rating: 9 out of 10

21 March 2022

Bits from Debian: New Debian Developers and Maintainers (January and February 2022)

The following contributor got his Debian Developer account in the last two months: The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months: Congratulations!

25 May 2021

Vincent Bernat: Jerikan+Ansible: a configuration management system for network

There are many resources for network automation with Ansible. Most of them only expose the first steps or limit themselves to a narrow scope. They give no clue on how to expand from that. Real network environments may be large, versatile, heterogeneous, and filled with exceptions. The lack of real-world examples for Ansible deployments, unlike Puppet and SaltStack, leads many teams to build brittle and incomplete automation solutions. We have released under an open-source license our attempt to tackle this problem: Here is a quick demo to configure a new peering:
This work is the collective effort of C dric Hasco t, Jean-Christophe Legatte, Lo c Pailhas, S bastien Hurtel, Tchadel Icard, and Vincent Bernat. We are the network team of Blade, a French company operating Shadow, a cloud-computing product. In May 2021, our company was bought by Octave Klaba and the infrastructure is being transferred to OVHcloud, saving Shadow as a product, but making our team redundant. Our network was around 800 devices, spanning over 10 datacenters with more than 2.5 Tbps of available egress bandwidth. The released material is therefore a substantial example of managing a medium-scale network using Ansible. We have left out the handling of our legacy datacenters to make the final result more readable while keeping enough material to not turn it into a trivial example.

Jerikan The first component is Jerikan. As input, it takes a list of devices, configuration data, templates, and validation scripts. It generates a set of configuration files for each device. Ansible could cover this task, but it has the following limitations:
  • it is slow;
  • errors are difficult to debug;1 and
  • the hierarchy to look up a variable is rigid.
Jerikan inputs and outputs
Jerikan inputs and outputs
If you want to follow the examples, you only need to have Docker and Docker Compose installed. Clone the repository and you are ready!

Source of truth We use YAML files, versioned with Git, as the single source of truth instead of using a database, like NetBox, or a mix of a database and text files. This provides many advantages:
  • anyone can use their preferred text editor;
  • the team prepares changes in branches;
  • the team reviews changes using merge requests;
  • the merge requests expose the changes to the generated configuration files;
  • rollback to a previous state is easy; and
  • it is fast.
The first file is devices.yaml. It contains the device list. The second file is classifier.yaml. It defines a scope for each device. A scope is a set of keys and values. It is used in templates and to look up data associated with a device.
$ ./run-jerikan scope to1-p1.sk1.blade-group.net
continent: apac
environment: prod
groups:
- tor
- tor-bgp
- tor-bgp-compute
host: to1-p1.sk1
location: sk1
member: '1'
model: dell-s4048
os: cumulus
pod: '1'
shorthost: to1-p1
The device name is matched against a list of regular expressions and the scope is extended by the result of each match. For to1-p1.sk1.blade-group.net, the following subset of classifier.yaml defines its scope:
matchers:
  - '^(([^.]*)\..*)\.blade-group\.net':
      environment: prod
      host: '\1'
      shorthost: '\2'
  - '\.(sk1)\.':
      location: '\1'
      continent: apac
  - '^to([12])-[as]?p(\d+)\.':
      member: '\1'
      pod: '\2'
  - '^to[12]-p\d+\.':
      groups:
        - tor
        - tor-bgp
        - tor-bgp-compute
  - '^to[12]-(p ap)\d+\.sk1\.':
      os: cumulus
      model: dell-s4048
The third file is searchpaths.py. It describes which directories to search for a variable. A Python function provides a list of paths to look up in data/ for a given scope. Here is a simplified version:2
def searchpaths(scope):
    paths = [
        "host/ scope[location] / scope[shorthost] ",
        "location/ scope[location] ",
        "os/ scope[os] - scope[model] ",
        "os/ scope[os] ",
        'common'
    ]
    for idx in range(len(paths)):
        try:
            paths[idx] = paths[idx].format(scope=scope)
        except KeyError:
            paths[idx] = None
    return [path for path in paths if path]
With this definition, the data for to1-p1.sk1.blade-group.net is looked up in the following paths:
$ ./run-jerikan scope to1-p1.sk1.blade-group.net
[ ]
Search paths:
  host/sk1/to1-p1
  location/sk1
  os/cumulus-dell-s4048
  os/cumulus
  common
Variables are scoped using a namespace that should be specified when doing a lookup. We use the following ones:
  • system for accounts, DNS, syslog servers,
  • topology for ports, interfaces, IP addresses, subnets,
  • bgp for BGP configuration
  • build for templates and validation scripts
  • apps for application variables
When looking up for a variable in a given namespace, Jerikan looks for a YAML file named after the namespace in each directory in the search paths. For example, if we look up a variable for to1-p1.sk1.blade-group.net in the bgp namespace, the following YAML files are processed: host/sk1/to1-p1/bgp.yaml, location/sk1/bgp.yaml, os/cumulus-dell-s4048/bgp.yaml, os/cumulus/bgp.yaml, and common/bgp.yaml. The search stops at the first match. The schema.yaml file allows us to override this behavior by asking to merge dictionaries and arrays across all matching files. Here is an excerpt of this file for the topology namespace:
system:
  users:
    merge: hash
  sampling:
    merge: hash
  ansible-vars:
    merge: hash
  netbox:
    merge: hash
The last feature of the source of truth is the ability to use Jinja2 templates for keys and values by prefixing them with ~ :
# In data/os/junos/system.yaml
netbox:
  manufacturer: Juniper
  model: "~  model upper  "
# In data/groups/tor-bgp-compute/system.yaml
netbox:
  role: net_tor_gpu_switch
Looking up for netbox in the system namespace for to1-p2.ussfo03.blade-group.net yields the following result:
$ ./run-jerikan scope to1-p2.ussfo03.blade-group.net
continent: us
environment: prod
groups:
- tor
- tor-bgp
- tor-bgp-compute
host: to1-p2.ussfo03
location: ussfo03
member: '1'
model: qfx5110-48s
os: junos
pod: '2'
shorthost: to1-p2
[ ]
Search paths:
[ ]
  groups/tor-bgp-compute
[ ]
  os/junos
  common
$ ./run-jerikan lookup to1-p2.ussfo03.blade-group.net system netbox
manufacturer: Juniper
model: QFX5110-48S
role: net_tor_gpu_switch
This also works for structured data:
# In groups/adm-gateway/topology.yaml
interface-rescue:
  address: "~  lookup('topology', 'addresses').rescue  "
  up:
    - "~ip route add default via   lookup('topology', 'addresses').rescue ipaddr('first_usable')   table rescue"
    - "~ip rule add from   lookup('topology', 'addresses').rescue ipaddr('address')   table rescue priority 10"
# In groups/adm-gateway-sk1/topology.yaml
interfaces:
  ens1f0: "~  lookup('topology', 'interface-rescue')  "
This yields the following result:
$ ./run-jerikan lookup gateway1.sk1.blade-group.net topology interfaces
[ ]
ens1f0:
  address: 121.78.242.10/29
  up:
  - ip route add default via 121.78.242.9 table rescue
  - ip rule add from 121.78.242.10 table rescue priority 10
When putting data in the source of truth, we use the following rules:
  1. Don t repeat yourself.
  2. Put the data in the most specific place without breaking the first rule.
  3. Use templates with parsimony, mostly to help with the previous rules.
  4. Restrict the data model to what is needed for your use case.
The first rule is important. For example, when specifying IP addresses for a point-to-point link, only specify one side and deduce the other value in the templates. The last rule means you do not need to mimic a BGP YANG model to specify BGP peers and policies:
peers:
  transit:
    cogent:
      asn: 174
      remote:
        - 38.140.30.233
        - 2001:550:2:B::1F9:1
      specific-import:
        - name: ATT-US
          as-path: ".*7018$"
          lp-delta: 50
  ix-sfmix:
    rs-sfmix:
      monitored: true
      asn: 63055
      remote:
        - 206.197.187.253
        - 206.197.187.254
        - 2001:504:30::ba06:3055:1
        - 2001:504:30::ba06:3055:2
    blizzard:
      asn: 57976
      remote:
        - 206.197.187.42
        - 2001:504:30::ba05:7976:1
      irr: AS-BLIZZARD

Templates The list of templates to compile for each device is stored in the source of truth, under the build namespace:
$ ./run-jerikan lookup edge1.ussfo03.blade-group.net build templates
data.yaml: data.j2
config.txt: junos/main.j2
config-base.txt: junos/base.j2
config-irr.txt: junos/irr.j2
$ ./run-jerikan lookup to1-p1.ussfo03.blade-group.net build templates
data.yaml: data.j2
config.txt: cumulus/main.j2
frr.conf: cumulus/frr.j2
interfaces.conf: cumulus/interfaces.j2
ports.conf: cumulus/ports.j2
dhcpd.conf: cumulus/dhcp.j2
default-isc-dhcp: cumulus/default-isc-dhcp.j2
authorized_keys: cumulus/authorized-keys.j2
motd: linux/motd.j2
acl.rules: cumulus/acl.j2
rsyslog.conf: cumulus/rsyslog.conf.j2
Templates are using Jinja2. This is the same engine used in Ansible. Jerikan ships some custom filters but also reuse some of the useful filters from Ansible, notably ipaddr. Here is an excerpt of templates/junos/base.j2 to configure DNS and NTP servers on Juniper devices:
system  
  ntp  
 % for ntp in lookup("system", "ntp") % 
    server   ntp  ;
 % endfor % 
   
  name-server  
 % for dns in lookup("system", "dns") % 
      dns  ;
 % endfor % 
   
 
The equivalent template for Cisco IOS-XR is:
 % for dns in lookup('system', 'dns') % 
domain vrf VRF-MANAGEMENT name-server   dns  
 % endfor % 
!
 % for syslog in lookup('system', 'syslog') % 
logging   syslog   vrf VRF-MANAGEMENT
 % endfor % 
!
There are three helper functions provided:
  • devices() returns the list of devices matching a set of conditions on the scope. For example, devices("location==ussfo03", "groups==tor-bgp") returns the list of devices in San Francisco in the tor-bgp group. You can also omit the operator if you want the specified value to be equal to the one in the local scope. For example, devices("location") returns devices in the current location.
  • lookup() does a key lookup. It takes the namespace, the key, and optionally, a device name. If not provided, the current device is assumed.
  • scope() returns the scope of the provided device.
Here is how you would define iBGP sessions between edge devices in the same location:
 % for neighbor in devices("location", "groups==edge") if neighbor != device % 
   % for address in lookup("topology", "addresses", neighbor).loopback tolist % 
protocols bgp group IPV  address ipv  -EDGES-IBGP  
  neighbor   address    
    description "IPv  address ipv  : iBGP to   neighbor  ";
   
 
   % endfor % 
 % endfor % 
We also have a global key-value store to save information to be reused in another template or device. This is quite useful to automatically build DNS records. First, capture the IP address inserted into a template with store() as a filter:
interface Loopback0
 description 'Loopback:'
  % for address in lookup('topology', 'addresses').loopback tolist % 
 ipv  address ipv   address   address store('addresses', 'Loopback0') ipaddr('cidr')  
  % endfor % 
!
Then, reuse it later to build DNS records by iterating over store():4
 % for device, ip, interface in store('addresses') % 
   % set interface = interface replace('/', '-') replace('.', '-') replace(':', '-') % 
   % set name = ' . '.format(interface lower, device) % 
  name  . IN   'A' if ip ipv4 else 'AAAA'     ip ipaddr('address')  
 % endfor % 
Templates are compiled locally with ./run-jerikan build. The --limit argument restricts the devices to generate configuration files for. Build is not done in parallel because a template may depend on the data collected by another template. Currently, it takes 1 minute to compile around 3000 files spanning over 800 devices.
Jerikan outputs when building templates
Output of Jerikan after building configuration files for six devices
When an error occurs, a detailed traceback is displayed, including the template name, the line number and the value of all visible variables. This is a major time-saver compared to Ansible!
templates/opengear/config.j2:15: in top-level template code
    config.interfaces.  interface  .netmask   adddress   ipaddr("netmask")  
        continent  = 'us'
        device     = 'con1-ag2.ussfo03.blade-group.net'
        environment = 'prod'
        host       = 'con1-ag2.ussfo03'
        infos      =  'address': '172.30.24.19/21' 
        interface  = 'wan'
        location   = 'ussfo03'
        loop       = <LoopContext 1/2>
        member     = '2'
        model      = 'cm7132-2-dac'
        os         = 'opengear'
        shorthost  = 'con1-ag2'
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
value = JerkianUndefined, query = 'netmask', version = False, alias = 'ipaddr'
[ ]
        # Check if value is a list and parse each element
        if isinstance(value, (list, tuple, types.GeneratorType)):
            _ret = [ipaddr(element, str(query), version) for element in value]
            return [item for item in _ret if item]
>       elif not value or value is True:
E       jinja2.exceptions.UndefinedError: 'dict object' has no attribute 'adddress'
We don t have general-purpose rules when writing templates. Like for the source of truth, there is no need to create generic templates able to produce any BGP configuration. There is a balance to be found between readability and avoiding duplication. Templates can become scary and complex: sometimes, it s better to write a filter or a function in jerikan/jinja.py. Mastering Jinja2 is a good investment. Take time to browse through our templates as some of them show interesting features.

Checks Optionally, each configuration file can be validated by a script in the checks/ directory. Jerikan looks up the key checks in the build namespace to know which checks to run:
$ ./run-jerikan lookup edge1.ussfo03.blade-group.net build checks
- description: Juniper configuration file syntax check
  script: checks/junoser
  cache:
    input: config.txt
    output: config-set.txt
- description: check YAML data
  script: checks/data.yaml
  cache: data.yaml
In the above example, checks/junoser is executed if there is a change to the generated config.txt file. It also outputs a transformed version of the configuration file which is easier to understand when using diff. Junoser checks a Junos configuration file using Juniper s XML schema definition for Netconf.5 On error, Jerikan displays:
jerikan/build.py:127: RuntimeError
-------------- Captured syntax check with Junoser call --------------
P: checks/junoser edge2.ussfo03.blade-group.net
C: /app/jerikan
O:
E: Invalid syntax:  set system syslog archive size 10m files 10 word-readable
S: 1

Integration into GitLab CI The next step is to compile the templates using a CI. As we are using GitLab, Jerikan ships with a .gitlab-ci.yml file. When we need to make a change, we create a dedicated branch and a merge request. GitLab compiles the templates using the same environment we use on our laptops and store them as an artifact.
Merge requests in GitLab for a change
Merge request to add a new port in USSFO03. The templates were compiled successfully but approval from another team member is still required to merge.
Before approving the merge request, another team member looks at the changes in data and templates but also the differences for the generated configuration files:
Differences for generated configuration files
The change configures a port on the Juniper device, adds records to DNS, and updates NetBox with the new IP addresses (not shown).

Ansible After Jerikan has built the configuration files, Ansible takes over. It is also packaged as a Docker image to avoid the trouble to maintain the right Python virtual environment and ensure everyone is using the same versions.

Inventory Jerikan has generated an inventory file. It contains all the managed devices, the variables defined for each of them and the groups converted to Ansible groups:
ob1-n1.sk1.blade-group.net ansible_host=172.29.15.12 ansible_user=blade ansible_connection=network_cli ansible_network_os=ios
ob2-n1.sk1.blade-group.net ansible_host=172.29.15.13 ansible_user=blade ansible_connection=network_cli ansible_network_os=ios
ob1-n1.ussfo03.blade-group.net ansible_host=172.29.15.12 ansible_user=blade ansible_connection=network_cli ansible_network_os=ios
none ansible_connection=local
[oob]
ob1-n1.sk1.blade-group.net
ob2-n1.sk1.blade-group.net
ob1-n1.ussfo03.blade-group.net
[os-ios]
ob1-n1.sk1.blade-group.net
ob2-n1.sk1.blade-group.net
ob1-n1.ussfo03.blade-group.net
[model-c2960s]
ob1-n1.sk1.blade-group.net
ob2-n1.sk1.blade-group.net
ob1-n1.ussfo03.blade-group.net
[location-sk1]
ob1-n1.sk1.blade-group.net
ob2-n1.sk1.blade-group.net
[location-ussfo03]
ob1-n1.ussfo03.blade-group.net
[in-sync]
ob1-n1.sk1.blade-group.net
ob2-n1.sk1.blade-group.net
ob1-n1.ussfo03.blade-group.net
none
in-sync is a special group for devices which configuration should match the golden configuration. Daily and unattended, Ansible should be able to push configurations to this group. The mid-term goal is to cover all devices. none is a special device for tasks not related to a specific host. This includes synchronizing NetBox, IRR objects, and the DNS, updating the RPKI, and building the geofeed files.

Playbook We use a single playbook for all devices. It is described in the ansible/playbooks/site.yaml file. Here is a shortened version:
- hosts: adm-gateway:!done
  strategy: mitogen_linear
  roles:
    - blade.linux
    - blade.adm-gateway
    - done
- hosts: os-linux:!done
  strategy: mitogen_linear
  roles:
    - blade.linux
    - done
- hosts: os-junos:!done
  gather_facts: false
  roles:
    - blade.junos
    - done
- hosts: os-opengear:!done
  gather_facts: false
  roles:
    - blade.opengear
    - done
- hosts: none:!done
  gather_facts: false
  roles:
    - blade.none
    - done
A host executes only one of the play. For example, a Junos device executes the blade.junos role. Once a play has been executed, the device is added to the done group and the other plays are skipped. The playbook can be executed with the configuration files generated by the GitLab CI using the ./run-ansible-gitlab command. This is a wrapper around Docker and the ansible-playbook command and it accepts the same arguments. To deploy the configuration on the edge devices for the SK1 datacenter in check mode, we use:
$ ./run-ansible-gitlab playbooks/site.yaml --limit='edge:&location-sk1' --diff --check
[ ]
PLAY RECAP *************************************************************
edge1.sk1.blade-group.net  : ok=6    changed=0    unreachable=0    failed=0    skipped=3    rescued=0    ignored=0
edge2.sk1.blade-group.net  : ok=5    changed=0    unreachable=0    failed=0    skipped=1    rescued=0    ignored=0
We have some rules when writing roles:
  • --check must detect if a change is needed;
  • --diff must provide a visualization of the planned changes;
  • --check and --diff must not display anything if there is nothing to change;
  • writing a custom module tailored to our needs is a valid solution;
  • the whole device configuration is managed;6
  • secrets must be stored in Vault;
  • templates should be avoided as we have Jerikan for that; and
  • avoid duplication and reuse tasks.7
We avoid using collections from Ansible Galaxy, the exception being collections to connect and interact with vendor devices, like cisco.iosxr collection. The quality of Ansible Galaxy collections is quite random and it is an additional maintenance burden. It seems better to write roles tailored to our needs. The collections we use are in ci/ansible/ansible-galaxy.yaml. We use Mitogen to get a 10 speedup on Ansible executions on Linux hosts. We also have a few playbooks for operational purpose: upgrading the OS version, isolate an edge router, etc. We were also planning on how to add operational checks in roles: are all the BGP sessions up? They could have been used to validate a deployment and rollback if there is an issue. Currently, our playbooks are run from our laptops. To keep tabs, we are using ARA. A weekly dry-run on devices in the in-sync group also provides a dashboard on which devices we need to run Ansible on.

Configuration data and templates Jerikan ships with pre-populated data and templates matching the configuration of our USSFO03 and SK1 datacenters. They do not exist anymore but, we promise, all this was used in production back in the days!
Network architecture for Blade datacenter
The latest iteration of our network infrastructure for SK1, USSFO03, and future data centers. The production network is using BGPttH using a spine-leaf fabric. The out-of-band network is using a simple L2 design, using the spanning tree protocol, as well as a set of console servers.
Notably, you can find the configuration for:
our edge routers
Some are running on Junos, like edge2.ussfo03, the others on IOS-XR, like edge1.sk1. The implemented functionalities are similar in both cases and we could swap one for the other. It includes the BGP configuration for transits, peerings, and IX as well as the associated BGP policies. PeeringDB is queried to get the maximum number of prefixes to accept for peerings. bgpq3 and a containerized IRRd help to filter received routes. A firewall is added to protect the routing engine. Both IPv4 and IPv6 are configured.
our BGP-based fabric
BGP is used inside the datacenter8 and is extended on bare-metal hosts. The configuration is automatically derived from the device location and the port number.9 Top-of-the-rack devices are using passive BGP sessions for ports towards servers. They are also serving a provisioning network to let them boot using DHCP and PXE. They also act as a DHCP server. The design is multivendor. Some devices are running Cumulus Linux, like to1-p1.ussfo03, while some others are running Junos, like to1-p2.ussfo03.
our out-of-band fabric
We are using Cisco Catalyst 2960 switches to build an L2 out-of-band network. To provide redundancy and saving a few bucks on wiring, we build small loops and run the spanning-tree protocol. See ob1-p1.ussfo03. It is redundantly connected to our gateway servers. We also use OpenGear devices for console access. See con1-n1.ussfo03
our administrative gateways
These Linux servers have multiple purposes: SSH jump boxes, rescue connection, direct access to the out-of-band network, zero-touch provisioning of network devices,10 Internet access for management flows, centralization of the console servers using Conserver, and API for autoconfiguration of BGP sessions for bare-metal servers. They are the first servers installed in a new datacenter and are used to provision everything else. Check both the generated files and the associated Ansible tasks.

  1. Ansible does not even provide a line number when there is an error in a template. You may need to find the problem by bisecting.
    $ ansible --version
    ansible 2.10.8
    [ ]
    $ cat test.j2
    Hello   name  !
    $ ansible all -i localhost, \
    >  --connection=local \
    >  -m template \
    >  -a "src=test.j2 dest=test.txt"
    localhost   FAILED! =>  
        "changed": false,
        "msg": "AnsibleUndefinedVariable: 'name' is undefined"
     
    
  2. You may recognize the same concepts as in Hiera, the hierarchical key-value store from Puppet. At first, we were using Jerakia, a similar independent store exposing an HTTP REST interface. However, the lookup overhead is too large for our use. Jerikan implements the same functionality within a Python function.
  3. The list of available filters is mangled inside jerikan/jinja.py. This is a remain of the fact we do not maintain Jerikan as a standalone software.
  4. This is a bit confusing: we have a store() filter and a store() function. With Jinja2, filters and functions live in two different namespaces.
  5. We are using a fork with some modifications to be able to validate our configurations and exposing an HTTP service to reduce the time spent on each configuration check.
  6. There is a trend in network automation to automate a configuration subset, for example by having a playbook to create a new BGP session. We believe this is wrong: with time, your configuration will get out-of-sync with its expected state, notably hand-made changes will be left undetected.
  7. See ansible/roles/blade.linux/tasks/firewall.yaml and ansible/roles/blade.linux/tasks/interfaces.yaml. They are meant to be called when needed, using import_role.
  8. We also have some datacenters using BGP EVPN VXLAN at medium-scale using Juniper devices. As they are still in production today, we didn t include this feature but we may publish it in the future.
  9. In retrospect, this may not be a good idea unless you are pretty sure everything is uniform (number of switches for each layer, number of ports). This was not our case. We now think it is a better idea to assign a prefix to each device and write it in the source of truth.
  10. Non-linux based devices are upgraded and configured unattended. Cumulus Linux devices are automatically upgraded on install but the final configuration has to be pushed using Ansible: we didn t want to duplicate the configuration process using another tool.

26 October 2020

Reproducible Builds: Second Reproducible Builds IRC meeting

After the success of our previous IRC meeting, we are having our second IRC meeting today. Monday 26th October, at 18:00 UTC: Please join us on the #reproducible-builds channel on irc.oftc.net an agenda is available. As mentioned in our previous meeting announcement, due to the unprecedented events in 2020, there will be no in-person Reproducible Builds event this year, but we plan to run these IRC meetings every fortnight.

19 September 2020

Bits from Debian: New Debian Maintainers (July and August 2020)

The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months: Congratulations!

7 June 2020

Enrico Zini: Cooperation links

This comic was based on this essay from Augusten Burroughs: How to live unhappily ever after. In addition to the essay, I highly recommend reading his books. It's also been described in psychology as flow.
With full English subtitles
Confict where it comes from and how to deal with it
Communication skills
Other languages
Distributed teams are where people you work with aren t physically co-located, ie. they re at another office building, home or an outsourced company abroad. They re becoming increasingly popular, for DevOps and other teams, due to recruitment, diversity, flexibility and cost savings. Challenges arise due to timezones, language barriers, cultures and ways of working. People actively participating in Open Source communities tend to be effective in distributed teams. This session looks at how to apply core Open Source principles to distributed teams in Enterprise organisations, and the importance of shared purposes/goals, (mis)communication, leading vs managing teams, sharing and learning. We'll also look at practical aspects of what's worked well for others, such as alternatives to daily standups, promoting video conferencing, time management and virtual coffee breaks. This session is relevant for those leading or working in distributed teams, wanting to know how to cultivate an inclusive culture of increased trust and collaboration that leads to increased productivity and performance.

10 May 2020

Russ Allbery: Review: Golden Gates

Review: Golden Gates, by Conor Dougherty
Publisher: Penguin
Copyright: 2020
ISBN: 0-525-56022-X
Format: Kindle
Pages: 249
This review, for reasons that will hopefully become clear later, starts with a personal digression. I have been interested in political theory my entire life. That sounds like something admirable, or at least neutral. It's not. "Interested" means that I have opinions that are generally stronger than my depth of knowledge warrants. "Interested" means that I like thinking about and casting judgment on how politics should be done without doing the work of politics myself. And "political theory" is different than politics in important ways, not the least of which is that political actions have rarely been a direct danger to me or my family. I have the luxury of arguing about politics as a theory. In short, I'm at high risk of being one of those people who has an opinion about everything and shares it on Twitter. I'm still in the process (to be honest, near the beginning of the process) of making something useful out of that interest. I've had some success when I become enough a part of a community that I can do some of the political work, understand the arguments at a level deeper than theory, and have to deal with the consequences of my own opinions. But those communities have been on-line and relatively low stakes. For the big political problems, the ones that involve governments and taxes and laws, those that decide who gets medical treatment and income support and who doesn't, to ever improve, more people like me need to learn enough about the practical details that we can do the real work of fixing them, rather than only making our native (and generally privileged) communities better for ourselves. I haven't found my path helping with that work yet. But I do have a concrete, challenging, local political question that makes me coldly furious: housing policy. Hence this book. Golden Gates is about housing policy in the notoriously underbuilt and therefore incredibly expensive San Francisco Bay Area, where I live. I wanted to deepen that emotional reaction to the failures of housing policy with facts and analysis. Golden Gates does provide some of that. But this also turns out to be a book about the translation of political theory into practice, about the messiness and conflict that results, and about the difficult process of measuring success. It's also a book about how substantial agreement on the basics of necessary political change can still founder on the shoals of prioritization, tribalism, and people who are interested in political theory. In short, it's a book about the difficulty of changing the world instead of arguing about how to change it. This is not a direct analysis of housing policy, although Dougherty provides the basics as background. Rather, it's the story of the political fight over housing told primarily through two lenses: Sonja Trauss, founder of BARF (the Bay Area Renters' Federation); and a Redwood City apartment complex, the people who fought its rent increases, and the nun who eventually purchased it. Around that framework, Dougherty writes about the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association and the history of California's Proposition 13, a fight over a development in Lafayette, the logistics challenge of constructing sufficient housing even when approved, and the political career of Scott Wiener, the hated opponent of every city fighting for the continued ability to arbitrarily veto any new housing. One of the things Golden Gates helped clarify for me is that there are three core interest groups that have to be part of any discussion of Bay Area housing: homeowners who want to limit or eliminate local change, renters who are vulnerable to gentrification and redevelopment, and the people who want to live in that area and can't (which includes people who want to move there, but more sympathetically includes all the people who work there but can't afford to live locally, such as teachers, day care workers, food service workers, and, well, just about anyone who doesn't work in tech). (As with any political classification, statements about collectives may not apply to individuals; there are numerous people who appear to fall into one group but who vote in alignment with another.) Dougherty makes it clear that housing policy is intractable in part because the policies that most clearly help one of those three groups hurt the other two. As advertised by the subtitle, Dougherty's focus is on the fight for more housing. Those who already own homes whose values have been inflated by artificial scarcity, or who want to preserve such stratified living conditions as low-density, large-lot single-family dwellings within short mass-transit commute of one of the densest cities in the United States, don't get a lot of sympathy or focus here except as opponents. I understand this choice; I also don't have much sympathy. But I do wish that Dougherty had spent more time discussing the unsustainable promise that California has implicitly made to homeowners: housing may be impossibly expensive, but if you can manage to reach that pinnacle of financial success, the ongoing value of your home is guaranteed. He does mention this in passing, but I don't think he puts enough emphasis on the impact that a single huge, illiquid investment that is heavily encouraged by government policy has on people's attitude towards anything that jeopardizes that investment. The bulk of this book focuses on the two factions trying to make housing cheaper: Sonja Trauss and others who are pushing for construction of more housing, and tenant groups trying to manage the price of existing housing for those who have to rent. The tragedy of Bay Area housing is that even the faintest connection of housing to the economic principle of supply and demand implies that the long-term goals of those two groups align. Building more housing will decrease the cost of housing, at least if you build enough of it over a long enough period of time. But in the short term, particularly given the amount of Bay Area land pre-emptively excluded from housing by environmental protection and the actions of the existing homeowners, building more housing usually means tearing down cheap lower-density housing and replacing it with expensive higher-density housing. And that destroys people's lives. I'll admit my natural sympathy is with Trauss on pure economic grounds. There simply aren't enough places to live in the Bay Area, and the number of people in the area will not decrease. To the marginal extent that growth even slows, that's another tale of misery involving "super commutes" of over 90 minutes each way. But the most affecting part of this book was the detailed look at what redevelopment looks like for the people who thought they had housing, and how it disrupts and destroys existing communities. It's impossible to read those stories and not be moved. But it's equally impossible to not be moved by the stories of people who live in their cars during the week, going home only on weekends because they have to live too far away from their jobs to commute. This is exactly the kind of politics that I lose when I take a superficial interest in political theory. Even when I feel confident in a guiding principle, the hard part of real-world politics is bringing real people with you in the implementation and mitigating the damage that any choice of implementation will cause. There are a lot of details, and those details matter. Without the right balance between addressing a long-term deficit and providing short-term protection and relief, an attempt to alleviate unsustainable long-term misery creates more short-term misery for those least able to afford it. And while I personally may have less sympathy for the relatively well-off who have clawed their way into their own mortgage, being cavalier with their goals and their financial needs is both poor ethics and poor politics. Mobilizing political opponents who have resources and vote locally isn't a winning strategy. Dougherty is a reporter, not a housing or public policy expert, so Golden Gates poses problems and tells stories rather than describes solutions. This book didn't lead me to a brilliant plan for fixing the Bay Area housing crunch, or hand me a roadmap for how to get effectively involved in local politics. What it did do is tell stories about what political approaches have worked, how they've worked, what change they've created, and the limitations of that change. Solving political problems is work. That work requires understanding people and balancing concerns, which in turn requires a lot of empathy, a lot of communication, and sometimes finding a way to make unlikely allies. I'm not sure how broad the appeal of this book will be outside of those who live in the region. Some aspects of the fight for housing generalize, but the Bay Area (and I suspect every region) has properties specific to it or to the state of California. It has also reached an extreme of housing shortage that is rivaled in the United States only by New York City, which changes the nature of the solutions. But if you want to seriously engage with Bay Area housing policy, knowing the background explained here is nearly mandatory. There are some flaws I wish Dougherty would have talked more about traffic and transit policy, although I realize that could be another book but this is an important story told well. If this somewhat narrow topic is within your interests, highly recommended. Rating: 8 out of 10

18 June 2017

Jonathan Carter: Debian 9 is available!

Congratulations to everyone who has played a part in the creation of Debian GNU/Linux 9.0! It s a great release, I ve installed the pre-release versions for friends, family and colleagues and so far the feedback has been very positive. This release is dedicated to Ian Murdock, who founded the Debian project in 1993, and sadly passed away on 28 December 2015. On the Debian ISO files a dedication statement is available on /doc/dedication/dedication-9.0.txt Here s a copy of the dedication text:
Dedicated to Ian Murdock
------------------------
Ian Murdock, the founder of the Debian project, passed away
on 28th December 2015 at his home in San Francisco. He was 42.
It is difficult to exaggerate Ian's contribution to Free
Software. He led the Debian Project from its inception in
1993 to 1996, wrote the Debian manifesto in January 1994 and
nurtured the fledgling project throughout his studies at
Purdue University.
Ian went on to be founding director of Linux International,
CTO of the Free Standards Group and later the Linux
Foundation, and leader of Project Indiana at Sun
Microsystems, which he described as "taking the lesson
that Linux has brought to the operating system and providing
that for Solaris".
Debian's success is testament to Ian's vision. He inspired
countless people around the world to contribute their own free
time and skills. More than 350 distributions are known to be
derived from Debian.
We therefore dedicate Debian 9 "stretch" to Ian.
-- The Debian Developers
During this development cycle, the amount of source packages in Debian grew from around 21 000 to around 25 000 packages, which means that there s a whole bunch of new things Debian can make your computer do. If you find something new in this release that you like, post about it on your favourite social networks, using the hashtag #newinstretch or look it up to see what others have discovered!

17 June 2017

Jonathan Carter: Debian 9 is available!

Congratulations to everyone who has played a part in the creation of Debian GNU/Linux 9.0! It s a great release, I ve installed the pre-release versions for friends, family and colleagues and so far the feedback has been very positive. This release is dedicated to Ian Murdock, who founded the Debian project in 1993, and sadly passed away on 28 December 2015. On the Debian ISO files a dedication statement is available on /doc/dedication/dedication-9.0.txt Here s a copy of the dedication text:
Dedicated to Ian Murdock
------------------------
Ian Murdock, the founder of the Debian project, passed away
on 28th December 2015 at his home in San Francisco. He was 42.
It is difficult to exaggerate Ian's contribution to Free
Software. He led the Debian Project from its inception in
1993 to 1996, wrote the Debian manifesto in January 1994 and
nurtured the fledgling project throughout his studies at
Purdue University.
Ian went on to be founding director of Linux International,
CTO of the Free Standards Group and later the Linux
Foundation, and leader of Project Indiana at Sun
Microsystems, which he described as "taking the lesson
that Linux has brought to the operating system and providing
that for Solaris".
Debian's success is testament to Ian's vision. He inspired
countless people around the world to contribute their own free
time and skills. More than 350 distributions are known to be
derived from Debian.
We therefore dedicate Debian 9 "stretch" to Ian.
-- The Debian Developers
During this development cycle, the amount of source packages in Debian grew from around 21 000 to around 25 000 packages, which means that there s a whole bunch of new things Debian can make your computer do. If you find something new in this release that you like, post about it on your favourite social networks, using the hashtag #newinstretch or look it up to see what others have discovered!

8 May 2017

Russ Allbery: Review: Chimes at Midnight

Review: Chimes at Midnight, by Seanan McGuire
Series: October Daye #7
Publisher: DAW
Copyright: 2013
ISBN: 1-101-63566-5
Format: Kindle
Pages: 346
Chimes at Midnight is the seventh book of the October Daye series and builds heavily on the previous books. Toby has gathered quite the group of allies by this point, and events here would casually spoil some of the previous books in the series (particularly One Salt Sea, which you absolutely do not want spoiled). I strongly recommend starting at the beginning, even if the series is getting stronger as it goes along. This time, rather than being asked for help, the book opens with Toby on a mission. Goblin fruit is becoming increasingly common on the streets of San Francisco, and while she's doing all she can to find and stop the dealers, she's finding dead changelings. Goblin fruit is a pleasant narcotic to purebloods, but to changelings it's instantly and fatally addictive. The growth of the drug trade means disaster for the local changelings, particularly since previous events in the series have broken a prominent local changeling gang. That was for the best, but they were keeping goblin fruit out, and now it's flooding into the power vacuum. In the sort of idealistic but hopelessly politically naive move that Toby is prone to, she takes her evidence to the highest local authority in faerie: the Queen of the Mists. The queen loathes Toby and the feeling is mutual, but Toby's opinion is that this shouldn't matter: these are her subjects and goblin fruit is widely recognized as a menace. Even if she cares nothing for their lives, a faerie drug being widely sold on the street runs the substantial risk that someone will give it to humans, potentially leading to the discovery of faerie. Sadly, but predictably, Toby has underestimated the Queen's malevolence. She leaves the court burdened not only with the knowledge that the Queen herself is helping with the distribution of goblin fruit, but also an impending banishment thanks to her reaction. She has three days to get out of the Queen's territory, permanently. Three days that the Luidaeg suggests she spend talking to people who knew King Gilad, the former and well-respected king of the local territory who died in the 1906 earthquake, apparently leaving the kingdom to the current Queen. Or perhaps not. As usual, crossing Toby is a very bad idea, and getting Toby involved in politics means that one should start betting heavily against the status quo. Also, as usual, things initially go far too well, and then Toby ends up in serious trouble. (I realize the usefulness of raising the stakes of the story, but I do prefer the books of this series that don't involve Toby spending much of the book ill.) However, there is a vast improvement over previous books in the story: one key relationship (which I'll still avoid spoiling) is finally out of the precarious will-they, won't-they stage and firmly on the page, and it's a relationship that I absolutely love. Watching Toby stomp people who deserve to be stomped makes me happy, but watching Toby let herself be happy and show it makes me even happier. McGuire also gives us some more long-pending revelations. I probably should have guessed the one about one of Toby's long-time friends and companions much earlier, although at least I did so a few pages before Toby found out. I have some strong suspicions about Toby's own background that were reinforced by this book, and will be curious to see if I'm right. And I'm starting to have guesses about the overall arc of the series, although not firm ones. One of my favorite things in long-running series is the slow revelation of more and more world background, and McGuire does it in just the way I like: lots of underlying complexity, reveals timed for emotional impact but without dragging on things that the characters should obviously be able to figure out, and a whole bunch of layered secrets that continue to provide more mystery even after one layer is removed. The plot here is typical of the plot of the last couple of novels in the series, which is fine by me since my favorite part of this series is the political intrigue (and Toby realizing that she has far more influence than she thinks). It helps that I thought Arden was great, given how central she is to this story. I liked her realistic reactions to her situation, and I liked her arguments with Toby. I'm dubious how correct Toby actually was, but we've learned by now that arguments from duty are always going to hold sway with her. And I loved Mags and the Library, and hope we'll be seeing more of them in future novels. The one quibble I'll close with, since the book closed with it, is that I found the ending rather abrupt. There were several things I wanted to see in the aftermath, and the book ended before they could happen. Hopefully that means they'll be the start of the next book (although a bit of poking around makes me think they may be in a novella). If you've liked the series so far, particularly the couple of books before this one, this is more of what you liked. Recommended. Followed by The Winter Long. Rating: 8 out of 10

26 January 2017

John Goerzen: What is happening to America?

I still remember vividly my first visit to Europe, back in 2010. I had just barely gotten off a plane in Hamburg and on to a bus to Lubeck, and struck up a conversation with a friendly, well-educated German classical musician next to me. We soon started to discuss politics and religion. Over the course of the conversation, in response to his questions, I explained I had twice voted against George W. Bush, that I opposed the war in Iraq for many reasons, that I did thought there was an ethical imperative to work to defeat climate change, that I viewed health care as an important ethical and religious issue, that I thought evolution was well-established, and that I am a Christian. Finally, without any hint of insult intended, and rather a lot of surprise written all over his face, he said: Wow. You re an American, and a Christian, and you re so . normal! This, it seems to me, has a lot to do with Trump. Ouch It felt like a punch to the gut. The day after the election, having known that a man that appeared to stand for everything that honorable people are against won the election, like people all around the world, I was trying to make sense of how could this happen? As I ve watched since, as he stacks government with wealthy cronies with records nearly as colorful as his own, it is easy to feel even more depressed. Based on how Trump spoke and acted, it would be easy to conclude that the deplorables won the day that he was elected by a contingent of sexists or racists ascendent in power. But that would be too simple an explanation. This is, after all, the same country that elected Barack Obama twice. There are a many people that voted twice for a black man, and then for Trump. Why? Racism, while doubtless a factor, can t explain it all. How Trump could happen Russ Allbery made some excellent points recently:
[Many Americans are] hurt, and they re scared, and they feel like a lot of the United States just slammed the door in their faces. The status quo is not working for people. Technocratic government by political elites is not working for people. Business as usual is not working for people. Minor tweaks to increasingly arcane systems is not working for people. People are feeling lost in bureaucracy, disaffected by elections that do not present a clear alternate vision, and depressed by a slow slide into increasingly dismal circumstances. Government is not doing what we want it to do for us. And people are getting left behind. The left in the United States (of which I m part) has for many years been very concerned about the way blacks and other racial minorities are systematically pushed to the margins of our economy, and how women are pushed out of leadership roles. Those problems are real. But the loss of jobs in the industrial heartland, the inability of a white, rural, working-class man to support his family the way his father supported him, the collapse of once-vibrant communities into poverty and despair: those problems are real too. The status quo is not working for anyone except for a few lucky, highly-educated people on the coasts. People, honestly, like me, and like many of the other (primarily white and male) people who work in tech. We are one of the few beneficiaries of a system that is failing the vast majority of people in this country.
Russ is, of course, right. The Democrats have been either complicit in policies damaging to many, or ineffective in preventing them. They have often appeared unconcerned with the plight of people outside cities (even if that wasn t really the case). And it goes deeper. When s the last time you visited Kansas? I live in Kansas. The nearest paved road is about a 3-mile drive from my home. The nearest town, population 600, is a 6-mile drive. My governor whom I did not vote for cut taxes on the wealthy so much that our excellent local schools have been struggling for years. But my community is amazing, full of loving and caring people, the sort of people who you know you ll be living with for 40 years, and so you make sure you get along well with. I have visited tourist sites in Berlin, enjoyed an opera and a Broadway show in New York, taken a train across the country to Portland, explored San Francisco. I ve enjoyed all of them. Many rural people do get out and experience the world. I have been in so many conversations where I try to explain where I live to people that simply cannot fathom it. I have explained how the 18 acres I own is a very small amount where I am. How, yes, I do actually have electricity and Internet. How a bad traffic day is one where I have to wait for three cars to go past before turning onto the paved road. How I occasionally find a bull in my front yard, how I can walk a quarter mile and be at the creek on the edge of my property, how I can get to an airport faster than most New Yorkers and my kids can walk out the front door and play in a spot more peaceful than Central Park, and how all this is way cheaper than a studio apartment in a bad part of San Francisco. It is rare indeed to see visitors actually traveling to Kansas as a destination. People have no concept of the fact that my mechanic would drop everything and help me get my broken-down car to the shop for no charge, that any number of neighbors or uncles would bring a tractor and come plow the snow off my 1/4-mile driveway out of sheer kindness, that people around here really care for each other in a way you don t see in a city. There are people that I know see politics way differently than me, but I know them to be good people. They would also do anything for a person in need, no matter who they are. I may find the people that they vote for to be repugnant, but I cannot say I ve looked this person in the eyes and they are nothing but deplorable. And so, people in rural areas feel misunderstood. And they are right. Some perspectives on Trump As I ve said, I do find Trump to be deplorable, but not everyone that voted for him is. How, then, do people wind up voting for him? The New Yorker had an excellent story about a man named Mark Frisbie, owner of a welding and fab shop. The recession had been hard on his business. His wife s day-care center also closed. Health care was hard to find, and the long, slow decline had spanned politicians of every stripe. Mark and his wife supposedly did everything they were supposed to: they worked hard, were honest, were entrepreneurial, and yet he had lost his business, his family house, his health coverage, everything. He doesn t want a handout. He wants to be able to earn a living. Asked who he d vote for, he said, Is none of the above an option? The Washington Post had another insightful article, about a professor from Madison, WI interviewing people in rural areas. She said people would often say: All the decisions are made in Madison and Milwaukee and nobody s listening to us. Nobody s paying attention, nobody s coming out here and asking us what we think. Decisions are made in the cities, and we have to abide by them. She pushed back, hard, on the idea that Trump supporters are ignorant, and added that liberals that push that line of thinking are only making the problem worse. I would agree; seeing all the talk about universities dis-inviting speakers that don t hew to certain political views doesn t help either. A related article talks about the lack of empathy for Trump voters. And then we have a more recent CNN article: Where Tump support and Obamacare use soar together, explaining in great detail how it can be logical for someone to be on Obamacare but not like it. We can all argue that the Republicans may have as much to do with that as anything, but the problem exists. And finally, a US News article makes this point:
His supporters realize he s a joke. They do not care. They know he s authoritarian, nationalist, almost un-American, and they love him anyway, because he disrupts a broken political process and beats establishment candidates who ve long ignored their interests. When you re earning $32,000 a year and haven t had a decent vacation in over a decade, it doesn t matter who Trump appoints to the U.N., or if he poisons America s standing in the world, you just want to win again, whoever the victim, whatever the price. According to the Republican Party, the biggest threat to rural America was Islamic terrorism. According to the Democratic Party it was gun violence. In reality it was prescription drug abuse and neither party noticed until it was too late.
Are we leaving people out? All this reminded me of reading about Donald Knuth, the famous computer scientist and something of the father of modern computing, writing about his feelings of trepidation about sharing with his university colleagues that he was working on a project related to the Bible. I am concerned about the complaints about the PC culture , because I think it is good that people aren t making racist or anti-semitic jokes in public anymore. But, as some of these articles point out, in many circles, making fun of Christians and conservatives is still one of the accepted targets. Does that really help anything? (And as a Christian that is liberal, have all of you that aren t Christians so quickly forgotten how churches like the Episcopals blazed the way for marriage equality many years ago already?) But they don t get a free pass I have found a few things, however, absolutely scary. One was an article from December showing that Trump voters actually changed their views on Russia after Trump became the nominee. Another one from just today was a study on how people reacted when showed inauguration crowd photos. NPR ran a story today as well, on how Trump is treating journalists like China does. Chilling stuff indeed. Conclusion So where does this leave us? Heading into uncertain times, for sure, but perhaps just maybe with a greater understanding of our neighbors. Perhaps we will all be able to see past the rhetoric and polarization, and understand that there is something, well, normal about each other. Doing that is going to be the only way we can really take our country back.

11 December 2016

Clint Adams: Only in San Francisco would one brag about this

I dated Appelbaum! she said. I gotta go, I said.

5 November 2016

Elizabeth Ferdman: Applying to Debian for Outreachy 2016

This year, Outreachy featured internships from organizations such as Debian, Fedora, GNOME, the Linux Kernel, Mozilla, Python, and Wikimedia, just to name a few. Each organization features mentored projects and in order to apply, applicants must contact the mentor, introduce themselves on the appropriate channels and make a small contribution to the project. After that, applicants might be required to fulfill additional tasks to demonstrate their abilities. Successful applicants will make quality contributions, communicate effectively with mentors, ask questions, fulfill tasks, help out their peers via mailing lists, and/or blog about their experience. One of the projects I applied to was the Clean Room for PGP and X.509 (PKI) Key Management. The project aims to create a Live Disc that enables users to create and manage their PGP keys easily and securely, using a text-based UI. I ve been a Debian user for about a year, but before applying to the project I didn t know much about GnuPG or public key encryption. Since then, I ve made some contributions and attended my first keysigning event in San Francisco featuring a lecture by Neal Walfield (more on that below). For my initial contribution, Daniel Pocock, the mentor for this project, asked that I write a script that lists the USB flash devices connected to the system and specifies which device the system booted from. Here s the bash script that I wrote, and that was enough to submit an application for Debian. My next task was to write a dns hook script for the dehydrated project, a shell client for signing certificates with Let s Encrypt (for free!). The script completes a dns challenge sent by the ACME-server by provisioning a TXT record for a given domain in order to prove ownership of the domain. I chose to write it in python and used the dnspython API. I posted my solution on github and there are many more here. At the lecture, Neal talked about good practices for key creation and management. Here are a few of those points: See the slides for Neal s full presentation.

Elizabeth Ferdman: Applying to Debian for Outreachy 2016

This year, Outreachy featured internships from organizations such as Debian, Fedora, GNOME, the Linux Kernel, Mozilla, Python, and Wikimedia, just to name a few. Each organization features mentored projects and in order to apply, applicants must contact the mentor, introduce themselves on the appropriate channels and make a small contribution to the project. After that, applicants might be required to fulfill additional tasks to demonstrate their abilities. Successful applicants will make quality contributions, communicate effectively with mentors, ask questions, fulfill tasks, help out their peers via mailing lists, and/or blog about their experience. One of the projects I applied to was the Clean Room for PGP and X.509 (PKI) Key Management. The project aims to create a Live Disc that enables users to create and manage their PGP keys easily and securely, using a text-based UI. I ve been a Debian user for about a year, but before applying to the project I didn t know much about GnuPG or public key encryption. Since then, I ve made some contributions and attended my first keysigning event in San Francisco featuring a lecture by Neal Walfield (more on that below). For my initial contribution, Daniel Pocock, the mentor for this project, asked that I write a script that lists the USB flash devices connected to the system and specifies which device the system booted from. Here s the bash script that I wrote, and that was enough to submit an application for Debian. My next task was to write a dns hook script for the dehydrated project, a shell client for signing certificates with Let s Encrypt (for free!). The script completes a dns challenge sent by the ACME-server by provisioning a TXT record for a given domain in order to prove ownership of the domain. I chose to write it in python and used the dnspython API. I posted my solution on github and there are many more here. At the lecture, Neal talked about good practices for key creation and management. Here are a few of those points: See the slides for Neal s full presentation.

9 October 2016

Nathan Handler: Ohio Linux Fest

This weekend, I traveled to Columbus, Ohio to attend Ohio Linux Fest. I departed San Francisco early on Thursday. It was interesting getting to experience the luxurious side of flying as I enjoyed a mimosa in the American Express Centurion lounge for the first time. I even happend to cross paths with Corey Quinn, who was on his way to [DevOpsDays Boise]. While connecting in Houston, I met up with the always awesome Jos Antonio Rey, who was to be my travel companion for this trip. The long day of travel took its toll on us, so we had a lazy Friday morning before checking in for the conference around lunch time. I was not that interested in the afternoon sessions, so I spent the majority of the first day helping out at the Ubuntu booth and catching up with friends and colleagues. The day ended with a nice Happy Hour sponsored by Oracle. Saturday was the main day for the conference. Ethan Galstad, Founder and CEO of Nagios, started the day with a Keynote about Becoming the Next Tech Entrepreneur. Next up was Elizabeth K. Joseph with A Tour of OpenStack Deployment Scenarios. While I ve read plenty about OpenStack, I ve never actually used it before. As a result, this demo and introduction was great to watch. It was entertaining to watch her login to CirrOS with the default password of cubswin:), as the Chicago Cubs are currently playing the San Francisco Giants in the National League Divisional Series (and winning). Unfortunately, I was not able to win a copy of her new Common OpenStack Deployments book, but it was great getting to watch her signing copies for other attendees after all of the hard work that went into writing the book. For lunch, Jos , Elizabeth, and Svetlana Belkin all gathered together for an informal Ubuntu lunch. Finally, it was time for me to give my talk. This was the same talk I gave at FOSSCON, but this time, I had a significantly larger audience. Practice definitely makes perfect, as my delivery was a lot better the second time giving this talk. Afterwards, I had a number of people come up to me to let me know that they really enjoyed the presentation. Pro Tip: If you ever attend a talk, the speaker will really appreciate any feedback you send their way. Even if it is a simple, Thank You , it really means a lot. One of the people who came up to me after the talk was Unit193. We have known each other through Ubuntu for years, but there has never been an opportunity to meet in person. I am proud to be able to say with 99% confidence that he is not a robot, and is in fact a real person. Next up was a lesson about the /proc filesystem. While I ve explored it a bit on my own before, I still learned a few tips and tricks about information that can be gained from the files in this magical directory. Following this was a talk about Leading When You re Not the Boss. It was even partially taught by a dummy (the speaker was a ventriloquist). The last regular talk of the day was one of the more interesting ones I attended. It was a talk by Patrick Shuff from Facebook about how they have built a load balancer than can handle a billion users. The slide deck was well-made with very clear diagrams. The speaker was also very knowledgeable and dealt with the plethora of questions he received. Prior to the closing keynote was a series of lightning talks. These served as a great means to get people laughing after a long day of talks. The closing keynote was given by father and daughter Joe and Lilly Born about The Democratization of Invention. Both of them had very interesting stories, and Lily was quite impressive given her age. We skipped the Nagios After Party in favor of a more casual pizza dinner. Overall, it was a great conference, and I am very glad to have had the opportunity to attend. A big thanks to Canonical and the Ubuntu Community for fudning my travel through the Ubuntu Community Fund and to the Ohio Linux Fest staff for allowing me the opportunity to speak at such a great conference.

6 October 2016

Nathan Handler: FOSSCON

This post is long past due, but I figured it is better late than never. At the start of the year, I set a goal to get more involved with attending and speaking at conferences. Through work, I was able to attend the Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE) in Pasadena, CA in January. I also got to give a talk at O'Relly's Open Source Convention (OSCON) in Austin, TX in May. However, I really wanted to give a talk about my experience contributing in the Ubuntu community. Jos Antonio Rey encouraged me to submit the talk to FOSSCON. While I've been aware of FOSSCON for years thanks to my involvement with the freenode IRC network (which has had a reference to FOSSCON in the /motd for years), I had never actually attended it before. I also wasn't quite sure how I would handle traveling from San Francisco, CA to Philadelphia, PA. Regardless, I decided to go ahead and apply. Fast forward a few weeks, and imagine my surprise when I woke up to an email saying that my talk proposal was accepted. People were actually interested in me and what I had to say. I immediately began researching flights. While they weren't crazy expensive, they were still more money than I was comfortable spending. Luckily, Jos had a solution to this problem as well; he suggested applying for funding through the Ubuntu Community Donations fund. While I've been an Ubuntu Member for over 8 years, I've never used this resource before. However, I was happy when I received a very quick approval. The conference itself was smaller than I was expecting. However, it was packed with lots of friendly and familiar faces of people I've interacted with online and in person over the years at various Open Source events. I started off the day by learning from Jos how to use Juju to quickly setup applications in the cloud. While Juju has definitely come a long way over the last couple of years, and it appears t be quite easy to learn and use, it still appears to be lacking some of the features needed to take full control over how the underlying applications interact with each other. However, I look forward to continuing to watch it grow and mature. Net up, we had a lunch break. There was no catered lunch at this conference, so we decided to get some cheesesteak at Abner's (is any trip to Philadelphia complete without cheesesteak?). Following lunch, I took some time to make a few last minute changes to my presentation and rehearse a bit. Finally, it was time. I got up in front of the audience and gave my presentation. Overall, I was quite pleased. It was not perfect, but for the first time giving the talk, I thought it went pretty well. I will work hard to make it even better for next tme. Following my talk was a series of brief lightning talks prior to the closing keynote. Another long time friend of mine, Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph, was giving the keynote about listening to the needs of your global open source community. While I have seen her speak on several other occassions, I really enjoyed this particular talk. It was full of great examples and anecdotes that were easy for the audience to relate to and start applying to their own communities. After the conference, a few of us went off and played tourist, paying the Liberty Bell a visit before concluding our trip in Philadelpha. Overall, I had a great time as FOSSCON. It was great being re-united with so many friends. A big thank you to Jos for his constant support and encouragement and to Canonical and the Ubuntu Community for helping to make it possible for me to attend this conference. Finally, thanks to the terrific FOSSCON staff for volunteering so much time to put on this great event.

19 May 2016

Valerie Young: Summer of Reproducible Builds

Hello friend, family, fellow Outreachy participants, and the Debian community!
This blog's primary purpose will be to track the progress of the Outreachy project in which I'm participating this summer    This post is to introduce myself and my project (working on the Debian reproducible builds project).
What is Outreachy? You might not know! Let me empower you: Outreachy is an organization connecting woman and minorities to mentors in the free (as in freedom) software community, /and/ funding for three months to work with the mentors and contribute to a free software project.  If you are a woman or minority human that likes free software, or if you know anyone in this situation, please tell them about Outreachy   Or put them in touch with me, I'd happily tell them more.
So who am I?
My name is Valerie Young. I live in the Boston Metropolitan Area (any other outreachy participants here?) and hella love free software. 
Some bullet pointed Val facts in rough reverse chronological order:
- I run Debian but only began contributing during the Outreachy application process
- If you went to DebConf2015, you might have seen me dye nine people's hair blue, blond or Debian swirl.
- If you stop through Boston I could be easily convinced to dye your hair.
- I worked on electronic medical records web application for the last two years (lotsa Javascriptin' and Perlin' at athenahealth)
- Before that I taught a programming summer program at University of Moratuwain Sri Lanka.
- Before that I got a degrees in physics and computer science at Boston University.
- At BU I helped start a hackerspace where my interest in technology, free software, hacker culture, anarchy, the internet all began.
- I grew up in the very fine San Francisco Bay Area.
What will I be working on?
Reproducible builds!
In the near future I'll write a  What is reproducible builds? Why is it so hot right now?  post.  For now, from a high (and not technical) level, reproducible builds is a broad effort to verify that the computer executable binary programs you run on your computer come from the human readable source code they claim to. It is not presently /impossible/ to do this verification, but it's not easy, and there are a lot of nuanced computer quirks that make it difficult for the most experienced programmer and straight-up impossible for a user with no technical expertise. And without this ability to verify -- the state we are in now -- any executable piece of software could be hiding secret code. 
The first step towards the goal of verifiability is to make reproducibility a essential part of software development. Reproducible builds means this: when you compile a program from the source code, it should always be identical, bit by bit. If the program is always identical, you can compare your version of the software to any trusted programmer with very little effort. If it is identical, you can trust it -- if it's not, you have reason to worry.
The Debian project is undergoing an effort to make the entire Debian operating system verifiable reproducible (hurray!). My outreachy-funded summer contribution involves the improving and updating tests.reproducible-builds.org   a site that presently presently surfaces the results of reproducibility testing of several free software projects (including Debian, Fedora, coreboot, OpenWrt, NetBSD, FreeBSD and ArchLinux). However, the design of test.r-b.org is a bit confusing, making it difficult for a user to find how to check on the reproducibility of a given package for one of the aforementioned projects, or understand the reasons for failure. Additional, the backend test results of Debian are outgrowing the original SQLite database, and many projects do not log the results of package testing at all. I hope, by the end of the summer, we'll have a more beefed-out and pretty site as well as better organized backend data  
This summer there will be 3 other Outreachy participants working on the Debian reproducible builds project! Check out their blogs/projects:
Scarlett
Satyam
Ceridwen
Thanks to our Debian mentors -- Lunar, Holger Levsen, and Mattia Rizzolo -- for taking us on   

17 May 2016

Sean Whitton: seoulviasfo

I spent last night in San Francisco on my way from Tucson to Seoul. This morning as I headed to the airport, I caught the end of a shouted conversation between a down-and-out and a couple of middle school-aged girls, who ran away back to the Asian Art museum as the conversation ended. A security guard told the man that he needed him to go away. The wealth divide so visible here just isn t something you really see around Tucson. I m working on a new module for Propellor that s complicated enough that I need to think carefully about the Haskell in order to write produce a flexible and maintainable module. I ve only been doing an hour or so of work on it per day, but the past few days I wake up each day with an idea for restructuring yesterday s code. These ideas aren t anything new to me: I think I m just dredging up the understanding of Haskell I developed last year when I was studying it more actively. Hopefully this summer I can learn some new things about Haskell. Riding on the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) feels like stepping back in time to the years of Microsoft s ascendency, before we had a tech world dominated by Google and Facebook: the platform announcements are in a computerised voice that sounds like it was developed in the nineties. They ll eventually replace the old trains apparently some new ones are coming in 2017 so I feel privileged to have been able to ride the older ones. I feel the same about the Tube in London. I really appreciate old but supremely reliable and effective public transport. It reminds me of the Debian toolchain: a bit creaky, but maintained over a sufficiently long period that it serves everyone a lot better than newer offerings, which tend to be produced with ulterior corporate motives.

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