Search Results: "daf"

20 June 2020

Dima Kogan: OpenCV C API transition. A rant.

I just went through a debugging exercise that was so ridiculous, I just had to write it up. Some of this probably should go into a bug report instead of a rant, but I'm tired. And clearly I don't care anymore. OK, so I'm doing computer vision work. OpenCV has been providing basic functions in this area, so I have been using them for a while. Just for really, really basic stuff, like projection. The C API was kinda weird, and their error handling is a bit ridiculous (if you give it arguments it doesn't like, it asserts!), but it has been working fine for a while. At some point (around OpenCV 3.0) somebody over there decided that they didn't like their C API, and that this was now a C++ library. Except the docs still documented the C API, and the website said it supported C, and the code wasn't actually removed. They just kinda stopped testing it and thinking about it. So it would mostly continue to work, except some poor saps would see weird failures; like this and this, for instance. OpenCV 3.2 was the last version where it was mostly possible to keep using the old C code, even when compiling without optimizations. So I was doing that for years. So now, in 2020, Debian is finally shipping a version of OpenCV that definitively does not work with the old code, so I had to do something. Over time I stopped using everything about OpenCV, except a few cvProjectPoints2() calls. So I decided to just write a small C++ shim to call the new version of that function, expose that with =extern "C"= to the rest of my world, and I'd be done. And normally I would be, but this is OpenCV we're talking about. I wrote the shim, and it didn't work. The code built and ran, but the results were wrong. After some pointless debugging, I boiled the problem down to this test program:
#include <opencv2/calib3d.hpp>
#include <stdio.h>
int main(void)
 
    double fx = 1000.0;
    double fy = 1000.0;
    double cx = 1000.0;
    double cy = 1000.0;
    double _camera_matrix[] =
          fx,  0, cx,
          0,  fy, cy,
          0,   0,  1  ;
    cv::Mat camera_matrix(3,3, CV_64FC1, _camera_matrix);
    double pp[3] =  1., 2., 10. ;
    double qq[2] =  444, 555 ;
    int N=1;
    cv::Mat object_points(N,3, CV_64FC1, pp);
    cv::Mat image_points (N,2, CV_64FC1, qq);
    // rvec,tvec
    double _zero3[3] =  ;
    cv::Mat zero3(1,3,CV_64FC1, _zero3);
    cv::projectPoints( object_points,
                       zero3,zero3,
                       camera_matrix,
                       cv::noArray(),
                       image_points,
                       cv::noArray(), 0.0);
    fprintf(stderr, "manually-projected no-distortion: %f %f\n",
            pp[0]/pp[2] * fx + cx,
            pp[1]/pp[2] * fy + cy);
    fprintf(stderr, "opencv says: %f %f\n", qq[0], qq[1]);
    return 0;
 
This is as trivial as it gets. I project one point through a pinhole camera, and print out the right answer (that I can easily compute, since this is trivial), and what OpenCV reports:
$ g++ -I/usr/include/opencv4 -o tst tst.cc -lopencv_calib3d -lopencv_core && ./tst
manually-projected no-distortion: 1100.000000 1200.000000
opencv says: 444.000000 555.000000
Well that's no good. The answer is wrong, but it looks like it didn't even write anything into the output array. Since this is supposed to be a thin shim to C code, I want this thing to be filling in C arrays, which is what I'm doing here:
double qq[2] =  444, 555 ;
int N=1;
cv::Mat image_points (N,2, CV_64FC1, qq);
This is how the C API has worked forever, and their C++ API works the same way, I thought. Nothing barfed, not at build time, or run time. Fine. So I went to figure this out. In the true spirit of C++, the new API is inscrutable. I'm passing in cv::Mat, but the API wants cv::InputArray for some arguments and cv::OutputArray for others. Clearly cv::Mat can be coerced into either of those types (and that's what you're supposed to do), but the details are not meant to be understood. You can read the snazzy C++-style documentation. Clicking on "OutputArray" in the doxygen gets you here. Then I guess you're supposed to click on "_OutputArray", and you get here. Understand what's going on now? Me neither. Stepping through the code revealed the problem. cv::projectPoints() looks like this:
void cv::projectPoints( InputArray _opoints,
                        InputArray _rvec,
                        InputArray _tvec,
                        InputArray _cameraMatrix,
                        InputArray _distCoeffs,
                        OutputArray _ipoints,
                        OutputArray _jacobian,
                        double aspectRatio )
 
    ....
    _ipoints.create(npoints, 1, CV_MAKETYPE(depth, 2), -1, true);
    ....
I.e. they're allocating a new data buffer for the output, and giving it back to me via the OutputArray object. This object already had a buffer, and that's where I was expecting the output to go. Instead it went to the brand-new buffer I didn't want. Issues: Well that's just super. I can call the C++ function, copy the data into the place it's supposed to go to, and then deallocate the extra buffer. Or I can pull out the meat of the function I want into my project, and then I can drop the OpenCV dependency entirely. Clearly that's the way to go. So I go poking back into their code to grab what I need, and here's what I see:
static void cvProjectPoints2Internal( const CvMat* objectPoints,
                  const CvMat* r_vec,
                  const CvMat* t_vec,
                  const CvMat* A,
                  const CvMat* distCoeffs,
                  CvMat* imagePoints, CvMat* dpdr CV_DEFAULT(NULL),
                  CvMat* dpdt CV_DEFAULT(NULL), CvMat* dpdf CV_DEFAULT(NULL),
                  CvMat* dpdc CV_DEFAULT(NULL), CvMat* dpdk CV_DEFAULT(NULL),
                  CvMat* dpdo CV_DEFAULT(NULL),
                  double aspectRatio CV_DEFAULT(0) )
 
...
 
Looks familiar? It should. Because this is the original C-API function they replaced. So in their quest to move to C++, they left the original code intact, C API and everything, un-exposed it so you couldn't call it anymore, and made a new, shitty C++ wrapper for people to call instead. CvMat is still there. I have no words. Yes, this is a massive library, and maybe other parts of it indeed did make some sort of non-token transition, but this thing is ridiculous. In the end, here's the function I ended up with (licensed as OpenCV; see the comment)
// The implementation of project_opencv is based on opencv. The sources have
// been heavily modified, but the opencv logic remains. This function is a
// cut-down cvProjectPoints2Internal() to keep only the functionality I want and
// to use my interfaces. Putting this here allows me to drop the C dependency on
// opencv. Which is a good thing, since opencv dropped their C API
//
// from opencv-4.2.0+dfsg/modules/calib3d/src/calibration.cpp
//
// Copyright (C) 2000-2008, Intel Corporation, all rights reserved.
// Copyright (C) 2009, Willow Garage Inc., all rights reserved.
// Third party copyrights are property of their respective owners.
//
// Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification,
// are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:
//
//   * Redistribution's of source code must retain the above copyright notice,
//     this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
//
//   * Redistribution's in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice,
//     this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation
//     and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
//
//   * The name of the copyright holders may not be used to endorse or promote products
//     derived from this software without specific prior written permission.
//
// This software is provided by the copyright holders and contributors "as is" and
// any express or implied warranties, including, but not limited to, the implied
// warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose are disclaimed.
// In no event shall the Intel Corporation or contributors be liable for any direct,
// indirect, incidental, special, exemplary, or consequential damages
// (including, but not limited to, procurement of substitute goods or services;
// loss of use, data, or profits; or business interruption) however caused
// and on any theory of liability, whether in contract, strict liability,
// or tort (including negligence or otherwise) arising in any way out of
typedef union
 
    struct
     
        double x,y;
     ;
    double xy[2];
  point2_t;
typedef union
 
    struct
     
        double x,y,z;
     ;
    double xyz[3];
  point3_t;
void project_opencv( // outputs
                     point2_t* q,
                     point3_t* dq_dp,               // may be NULL
                     double* dq_dintrinsics_nocore, // may be NULL
                     // inputs
                     const point3_t* p,
                     int N,
                     const double* intrinsics,
                     int Nintrinsics)
 
    const double fx = intrinsics[0];
    const double fy = intrinsics[1];
    const double cx = intrinsics[2];
    const double cy = intrinsics[3];
    double k[12] =  ;
    for(int i=0; i<Nintrinsics-4; i++)
        k[i] = intrinsics[i+4];
    for( int i = 0; i < N; i++ )
     
        double z_recip = 1./p[i].z;
        double x = p[i].x * z_recip;
        double y = p[i].y * z_recip;
        double r2      = x*x + y*y;
        double r4      = r2*r2;
        double r6      = r4*r2;
        double a1      = 2*x*y;
        double a2      = r2 + 2*x*x;
        double a3      = r2 + 2*y*y;
        double cdist   = 1 + k[0]*r2 + k[1]*r4 + k[4]*r6;
        double icdist2 = 1./(1 + k[5]*r2 + k[6]*r4 + k[7]*r6);
        double xd      = x*cdist*icdist2 + k[2]*a1 + k[3]*a2 + k[8]*r2+k[9]*r4;
        double yd      = y*cdist*icdist2 + k[2]*a3 + k[3]*a1 + k[10]*r2+k[11]*r4;
        q[i].x = xd*fx + cx;
        q[i].y = yd*fy + cy;
        if( dq_dp )
         
            double dx_dp[] =   z_recip, 0,       -x*z_recip  ;
            double dy_dp[] =   0,       z_recip, -y*z_recip  ;
            for( int j = 0; j < 3; j++ )
             
                double dr2_dp = 2*x*dx_dp[j] + 2*y*dy_dp[j];
                double dcdist_dp = k[0]*dr2_dp + 2*k[1]*r2*dr2_dp + 3*k[4]*r4*dr2_dp;
                double dicdist2_dp = -icdist2*icdist2*(k[5]*dr2_dp + 2*k[6]*r2*dr2_dp + 3*k[7]*r4*dr2_dp);
                double da1_dp = 2*(x*dy_dp[j] + y*dx_dp[j]);
                double dmx_dp = (dx_dp[j]*cdist*icdist2 + x*dcdist_dp*icdist2 + x*cdist*dicdist2_dp +
                                k[2]*da1_dp + k[3]*(dr2_dp + 4*x*dx_dp[j]) + k[8]*dr2_dp + 2*r2*k[9]*dr2_dp);
                double dmy_dp = (dy_dp[j]*cdist*icdist2 + y*dcdist_dp*icdist2 + y*cdist*dicdist2_dp +
                                k[2]*(dr2_dp + 4*y*dy_dp[j]) + k[3]*da1_dp + k[10]*dr2_dp + 2*r2*k[11]*dr2_dp);
                dq_dp[i*2 + 0].xyz[j] = fx*dmx_dp;
                dq_dp[i*2 + 1].xyz[j] = fy*dmy_dp;
             
         
        if( dq_dintrinsics_nocore )
         
            dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 0) + 0] = fx*x*icdist2*r2;
            dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 1) + 0] = fy*(y*icdist2*r2);
            dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 0) + 1] = fx*x*icdist2*r4;
            dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 1) + 1] = fy*y*icdist2*r4;
            if( Nintrinsics-4 > 2 )
             
                dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 0) + 2] = fx*a1;
                dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 1) + 2] = fy*a3;
                dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 0) + 3] = fx*a2;
                dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 1) + 3] = fy*a1;
                if( Nintrinsics-4 > 4 )
                 
                    dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 0) + 4] = fx*x*icdist2*r6;
                    dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 1) + 4] = fy*y*icdist2*r6;
                    if( Nintrinsics-4 > 5 )
                     
                        dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 0) + 5] = fx*x*cdist*(-icdist2)*icdist2*r2;
                        dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 1) + 5] = fy*y*cdist*(-icdist2)*icdist2*r2;
                        dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 0) + 6] = fx*x*cdist*(-icdist2)*icdist2*r4;
                        dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 1) + 6] = fy*y*cdist*(-icdist2)*icdist2*r4;
                        dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 0) + 7] = fx*x*cdist*(-icdist2)*icdist2*r6;
                        dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 1) + 7] = fy*y*cdist*(-icdist2)*icdist2*r6;
                        if( Nintrinsics-4 > 8 )
                         
                            dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 0) + 8] = fx*r2; //s1
                            dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 1) + 8] = fy*0; //s1
                            dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 0) + 9] = fx*r4; //s2
                            dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 1) + 9] = fy*0; //s2
                            dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 0) + 10] = fx*0;//s3
                            dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 1) + 10] = fy*r2; //s3
                            dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 0) + 11] = fx*0;//s4
                            dq_dintrinsics_nocore[(Nintrinsics-4)*(2*i + 1) + 11] = fy*r4; //s4
                         
                     
                 
             
         
     
 
This does only the stuff I need: projection only (no geometric transformation), and gradients in respect to the point coordinates and distortions only. Gradients in respect to fxy and cxy are trivial, and I don't bother reporting them. So now I don't compile or link against OpenCV, my code builds and runs on Debian/sid and (surprisingly) it runs much faster than before. Apparently there was a lot of pointless overhead happening. Alright. Rant over.

11 May 2020

Gunnar Wolf: Certified printer fumes

After losing a fair bit of hair due to quality and reliability issues with our home laser multifunctional (Brother DCP1600-series, which we bought after checking it was meant to work on Linux And it does, but with a very buggy, proprietary driver Besides being the printer itself of quite low quality), we decided it was time to survey the market again, and get a color inkjet printer. I was not very much an enthusiast of the idea, until I found all of the major manufacturers now offer refillable ink tanks instead of the darn expensive cartridges of past decades. Lets see how it goes! Of course, with over 20 years of training, I did my homework. I was about to buy an Epson printer, but decided for an HP Ink Tank 410 Wireless printer. The day it arrived, not wanting to fuss around too much to get to see the results, I connected it to my computer using the USB cable. Everything ran smoothly and happily! No driver hunting needed, print quality is superb I hope, years from now, we stay with this impression. Next day, I tried to print over WiFi. Of course, it requires configuration. And, of course, configuration strongly wants you to do it from a Windows or MacOS machine which I don t have. OK, fall back to Android For which an app download is required (and does not thrill me, but what can I say. Oh and the app needs location services to even run. Why Maybe because it interacts with the wireless network in WiFi Direct, non-authenticated way?) Anyway, things seem to work. But they don t My computers can identify and connect with the printer from CUPS, but nothing ever comes out. Printer paused, they say. Entering the printer s web interface is somewhat ambiguous Following the old HP practices, I tried http://192.168.1.75:9100/ (no point in hiding my internal IP), and got a partial webpage sometimes (and nothing at all othertimes). Seeing the printer got detected over ipps://, my immediate reaction was to try pointing the browser to port 631. Seems to work! Got some odd messages But it seems I ll soon debug the issue away. I am not a familiar meddler in the dark lands of cups, our faithful print server, but I had to remember my toolkit..
# cupsenable HP_Ink_Tank_Wireless_410_series_C37468_ --release
Sucess in enabling, but self-auto-disabled right away lpstat -t was not more generous, reporting only it was still paused. Some hours later (mix in attending kids and whatnot), I finally remember to try cupsctl --debug-logging, and magically, /var/log/cups/error_log turns from being quiet to being quite chatty. And, of course, my first print job starts being processed:
D [10/May/2020:23:07:20 -0500] Report: jobs-active=1
(...)
D [10/May/2020:23:07:25 -0500] [Job 174] Start rendering...
(...)
D [10/May/2020:23:07:25 -0500] [Job 174] STATE: -connecting-to-device
(...)
Everything looks fine and dandy so far! But, hey, given nothing came out of the printer keep reading one more second of logs (a couple dozen lines)
D [10/May/2020:23:07:26 -0500] [Job 174] Connection is encrypted.
D [10/May/2020:23:07:26 -0500] [Job 174] Credentials are expired (Credentials have expired.)
D [10/May/2020:23:07:26 -0500] [Job 174] Printer credentials: HPC37468 / Thu, 01 Jan 1970 00:00:00 GMT / 28A59EF511A480A34798B6712DEEAE74
D [10/May/2020:23:07:26 -0500] [Job 174] No stored credentials.
D [10/May/2020:23:07:26 -0500] [Job 174] update_reasons(attr=0(), s=\"-cups-pki-invalid,cups-pki-changed,cups-pki-expired,cups-pki-unknown\")
D [10/May/2020:23:07:26 -0500] [Job 174] STATE: -cups-pki-expired
(...)
D [10/May/2020:23:08:00 -0500] [Job 174] envp[16]="CUPS_ENCRYPTION=IfRequested"
(...)
D [10/May/2020:23:08:00 -0500] [Job 174] envp[27]="PRINTER_STATE_REASONS=cups-pki-expired"
My first stabs were attempts to get CUPS not to care about expired certificates, but it seems to have been hidden or removed from its usual place. Anyway, I was already frustrated. WTF Well, yes, turns out that from the Web interface, I paid some attention to this the first time around, but let it pass (speaks wonders about my security practices!): Way, way, way too expired cert So, the self-signed certificate the printer issued at itself expired 116 years before even being issued. (is this maybe a Y2k38 bug? Sounds like it!) Interesting thing, my CUPS log mentions the printer credentials to expire at the beginning of the Unix Epoch (01 Jan 1970 00:00:00 GMT). OK, lets clickety-click away on the Web interface Didn t take me long to get to Network Advanced settings Certificates: Can manage certs! However, clicking on Configure leads me to the not very reassuring Way, way, way too expired cert I don t remember what I did for the next couple of minutes. Kept fuming Until I parsed again the output of lpstat -t, and found that:
# lpstat -t
(...)
device for HP_Ink_Tank_Wireless_410_series_C37468_: ipps://HPF43909C37468.local:443/ipp/print
(...)
Hmmmm CUPS is connecting using good ol port 443, as if it were a Web thingy What if I do the same? Now we are talking! Click on New self-signed certificate , click on Next, a couple of reloads And a very nice color print came out of the printer, yay! Now, it still baffles me (of course I checked!): The self-signed certificate is now said to come from Issuer : CN=HPC37468, L=Vancouver, ST=Washington, C=US, O=HP,OU=HP-IPG, alright not that it matters (I can import a more meaningful one if I really feel like it), but, why is it Issued On: 2019-06-14 and set to Expires On: 2029-06-11? Anyway, print quality is quite nice. I hope to keep the printer long enough to rant at the certificate being expired in the future!

Comments Jeff Epler (Adafruit) 2020-05-11 20:39:17 -0500 why is it Issued On: 2019-06-14 and set to Expires On: 2029-06-11? Because it s 3650 days Gunnar Wolf 2020-05-11 20:39:17 -0500 Nice catch! Thanks for doing the head-scratching for me

26 March 2020

Axel Beckert: Pictures in pure HTML with chafa and aha

I recently stumbled upon chafa, a tool to display pictures, especially color pictures on your ANSI text terminal, e.g. inside an xterm. And I occasionally use aha, the Ansi HTML Adapter to convert a colorful terminal content into HTML to show off terminal screenshots without the requirement of a picture so that it also works in e.g. text browsers or for blinds. Combining chafa and aha: Examples A moment ago I had the thought what would happen if I feed the output of chafa into aha and expected nothing really usable. But I was surprised by the quality of the outcome.
looks like this after chafa -w 9 -c full -s 160x50 DSCN4692.jpg aha -n:
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                     
Checking the Look in Text Browsers It even looks not that bad in elinks as far as I know the only text browser which supports CSS and styles:
In Lynx and Links 2, the text composing the image is displayed only in black and white, but you at least can recognise the edges in the picture:
Same Functionality in One Tool? I knew there was a tool which did this in one step. Seems to have been png2html. Tried to play around with it, too, but neither really understood how to use it (seems to require a text file for the characters to be used why?) nor did I really got it working. It always ran until I aborted it and it never filled the target file with any content. Additionally, png2html insists on one character per pixel, requiring to first properly resize the image before converting to HTML. The Keyboard in the Pictures Oh, and btw., the displayed keyboard is my Zlant. The Zlant is a 40% uniform staggered mechanical keyboard. Currently, only Zlant PCBs are available at 1UP Keyboards (USA), i.e. no complete kits. It is shown with the SA Vilebloom key cap set, currently available at MechSupply (UK).

1 March 2020

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities February 2020

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • Debian wiki: deploy changes, unblock IP addresses, approve new accounts, auto-approve email domains

Communication

Sponsors The apt-offline backport and purple-discord uploads were sponsored by my employer. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

17 October 2017

Russ Allbery: Bundle haul

Confession time: I started making these posts (eons ago) because a close friend did as well, and I enjoyed reading them. But the main reason why I continue is because the primary way I have to keep track of the books I've bought and avoid duplicates is, well, grep on these posts. I should come up with a non-bullshit way of doing this, but time to do more elegant things is in short supply, and, well, it's my blog. So I'm boring all of you who read this in various places with my internal bookkeeping. I do try to at least add a bit of commentary. This one will be more tedious than most since it includes five separate Humble Bundles, which increases the volume a lot. (I just realized I'd forgotten to record those purchases from the past several months.) First, the individual books I bought directly: Ilona Andrews Sweep in Peace (sff)
Ilona Andrews One Fell Sweep (sff)
Steven Brust Vallista (sff)
Nicky Drayden The Prey of Gods (sff)
Meg Elison The Book of the Unnamed Midwife (sff)
Pat Green Night Moves (nonfiction)
Ann Leckie Provenance (sff)
Seanan McGuire Once Broken Faith (sff)
Seanan McGuire The Brightest Fell (sff)
K. Arsenault Rivera The Tiger's Daughter (sff)
Matthew Walker Why We Sleep (nonfiction)
Some new books by favorite authors, a few new releases I heard good things about, and two (Night Moves and Why We Sleep) from references in on-line articles that impressed me. The books from security bundles (this is mostly work reading, assuming I'll get to any of it), including a blockchain bundle: Wil Allsop Unauthorised Access (nonfiction)
Ross Anderson Security Engineering (nonfiction)
Chris Anley, et al. The Shellcoder's Handbook (nonfiction)
Conrad Barsky & Chris Wilmer Bitcoin for the Befuddled (nonfiction)
Imran Bashir Mastering Blockchain (nonfiction)
Richard Bejtlich The Practice of Network Security (nonfiction)
Kariappa Bheemaiah The Blockchain Alternative (nonfiction)
Violet Blue Smart Girl's Guide to Privacy (nonfiction)
Richard Caetano Learning Bitcoin (nonfiction)
Nick Cano Game Hacking (nonfiction)
Bruce Dang, et al. Practical Reverse Engineering (nonfiction)
Chris Dannen Introducing Ethereum and Solidity (nonfiction)
Daniel Drescher Blockchain Basics (nonfiction)
Chris Eagle The IDA Pro Book, 2nd Edition (nonfiction)
Nikolay Elenkov Android Security Internals (nonfiction)
Jon Erickson Hacking, 2nd Edition (nonfiction)
Pedro Franco Understanding Bitcoin (nonfiction)
Christopher Hadnagy Social Engineering (nonfiction)
Peter N.M. Hansteen The Book of PF (nonfiction)
Brian Kelly The Bitcoin Big Bang (nonfiction)
David Kennedy, et al. Metasploit (nonfiction)
Manul Laphroaig (ed.) PoC GTFO (nonfiction)
Michael Hale Ligh, et al. The Art of Memory Forensics (nonfiction)
Michael Hale Ligh, et al. Malware Analyst's Cookbook (nonfiction)
Michael W. Lucas Absolute OpenBSD, 2nd Edition (nonfiction)
Bruce Nikkel Practical Forensic Imaging (nonfiction)
Sean-Philip Oriyano CEHv9 (nonfiction)
Kevin D. Mitnick The Art of Deception (nonfiction)
Narayan Prusty Building Blockchain Projects (nonfiction)
Prypto Bitcoin for Dummies (nonfiction)
Chris Sanders Practical Packet Analysis, 3rd Edition (nonfiction)
Bruce Schneier Applied Cryptography (nonfiction)
Adam Shostack Threat Modeling (nonfiction)
Craig Smith The Car Hacker's Handbook (nonfiction)
Dafydd Stuttard & Marcus Pinto The Web Application Hacker's Handbook (nonfiction)
Albert Szmigielski Bitcoin Essentials (nonfiction)
David Thiel iOS Application Security (nonfiction)
Georgia Weidman Penetration Testing (nonfiction)
Finally, the two SF bundles: Buzz Aldrin & John Barnes Encounter with Tiber (sff)
Poul Anderson Orion Shall Rise (sff)
Greg Bear The Forge of God (sff)
Octavia E. Butler Dawn (sff)
William C. Dietz Steelheart (sff)
J.L. Doty A Choice of Treasons (sff)
Harlan Ellison The City on the Edge of Forever (sff)
Toh Enjoe Self-Reference ENGINE (sff)
David Feintuch Midshipman's Hope (sff)
Alan Dean Foster Icerigger (sff)
Alan Dean Foster Mission to Moulokin (sff)
Alan Dean Foster The Deluge Drivers (sff)
Taiyo Fujii Orbital Cloud (sff)
Hideo Furukawa Belka, Why Don't You Bark? (sff)
Haikasoru (ed.) Saiensu Fikushon 2016 (sff anthology)
Joe Haldeman All My Sins Remembered (sff)
Jyouji Hayashi The Ouroboros Wave (sff)
Sergei Lukyanenko The Genome (sff)
Chohei Kambayashi Good Luck, Yukikaze (sff)
Chohei Kambayashi Yukikaze (sff)
Sakyo Komatsu Virus (sff)
Miyuki Miyabe The Book of Heroes (sff)
Kazuki Sakuraba Red Girls (sff)
Robert Silverberg Across a Billion Years (sff)
Allen Steele Orbital Decay (sff)
Bruce Sterling Schismatrix Plus (sff)
Michael Swanwick Vacuum Flowers (sff)
Yoshiki Tanaka Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Volume 1: Dawn (sff)
Yoshiki Tanaka Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Volume 2: Ambition (sff)
Yoshiki Tanaka Legend of the Galactic Heroes, Volume 3: Endurance (sff)
Tow Ubukata Mardock Scramble (sff)
Sayuri Ueda The Cage of Zeus (sff)
Sean Williams & Shane Dix Echoes of Earth (sff)
Hiroshi Yamamoto MM9 (sff)
Timothy Zahn Blackcollar (sff)
Phew. Okay, all caught up, and hopefully won't have to dump something like this again in the near future. Also, more books than I have any actual time to read, but what else is new.

22 July 2017

Norbert Preining: Making fun of Trump thanks France

I mean, it is easy to make fun of Trump, he is just too stupid and incapable and uneducated. But what the French president Emmanuel Macron did on Bastille Day, in presence of the usual Trumpies, was just above the usual level of making fun of Trump. The French made Trump watch a French band playing a medley of Daft Punk. And as we know Trump seemed to be very unimpressed, most probably because he doesn t have a clue. I mean, normally you play these pathetic rubbish, look at the average US (or Chinese or North Korean) parades, and here we have the celebration of an event much older then anything the US can put on the table, and they are playing Daft Punk! France, thanks. You made my day actually not only one!

1 July 2017

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities June 2017

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • Debian: redirect 2 users to support channels, redirect 1 person to the mirrors team, investigate SMTP TLS question, fix ACL issue, restart dead exim4 service
  • Debian mentors: service restarts, security updates & reboot
  • Debian QA: deploy my changes
  • Debian website: release related rebuilds, rebuild installation-guide
  • Debian wiki: whitelist several email addresses, whitelist 1 domain
  • Debian package tracker: deploy my changes
  • Debian derivatives census: deploy my changes
  • Openmoko: security updates & reboots.

Communication

Sponsors All work was done on a volunteer basis.

1 June 2017

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities May 2017

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • Debian: discuss mail bounces with a hoster, check perms of LE results, add 1 user to a group, re-sent some TLS cert expiry mail, clean up mail bounce flood, approve some debian.net TLS certs, do the samhain dance thrice, end 1 samhain mail flood, diagnose/fix LDAP update issue, relay DebConf cert expiry mails, reboot 2 non-responsive VM, merged patches for debian.org-sources.debian.org meta-package,
  • Debian mentors: lintian/security updates & reboot
  • Debian wiki: delete stray tmp file, whitelist 14 email addresses, disable 1 accounts with bouncing email, ping 3 persons with bouncing email
  • Debian website: update/push index/CD/distrib
  • Debian QA: deploy my changes, disable some removed suites in qadb
  • Debian PTS: strip whitespace from existing pages, invalidate sigs so pages get a rebuild
  • Debian derivatives census: deploy changes
  • Openmoko: security updates & reboots.

Communication
  • Invite Purism (on IRC), XBian (also on IRC), DuZeru to the Debian derivatives census
  • Respond to the shutdown of Parsix
  • Report BlankOn fileserver and Huayra webserver issues
  • Organise a transition of Ubuntu/Endless Debian derivatives census maintainers
  • Advocate against Debian having a monopoly on hardware certification
  • Advocate working with existing merchandise vendors
  • Start a discussion about Debian membership in other organisations
  • Advocate for HPE to join the LVFS & support fwupd

Sponsors All work was done on a volunteer basis.

30 April 2017

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities April 2017

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • Debian systems: quiet a logrotate warning, investigate issue with DNSSEC and alioth, deploy fix on our first stretch buildd, restore alioth git repo after history rewrite, investigate iptables segfaults on buildd and investigate time issues on a NAS
  • Debian derivatives census: delete patches over 5 MiB, re-enable the service
  • Debian wiki: investigate some 403 errors, fix alioth KGB config, deploy theme changes, close a bogus bug report, ping 1 user with bouncing email, whitelist 9 email addresses and whitelist 2 domains
  • Debian QA: deploy my changes
  • Debian mentors: security upgrades and service restarts
  • Openmoko: debug mailing list issue, security upgrades and reboots

Communication
  • Invite Wazo to the Debian derivatives census
  • Welcome ubilinux, Wazo and Roopa Prabhu (of Cumulus Linux) to the Debian derivatives census
  • Discuss HP/ProLiant wiki page with HPE folks
  • Inform git history rewriter about the git mailmap feature

Sponsors The libconfig-crontab-perl backports and pyvmomi issue were sponsored by my employer. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

1 April 2017

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities March 2017

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • Debian systems: apply a patch to userdir-ldap, ask a local admin to reset a dead powerpc buildd, remove dead SH4 porterboxen from LDAP, fix perms on www.d.o OC static mirror, report false positives in an an automated abuse report, redirect 1 student to FAQs/support/DebianEdu, redirect 1 event organiser to partners/trademark/merchandise/DPL, redirect 1 guest account seeker to NM, redirect 1 @debian.org desirer to NM, redirect 1 email bounce to a changes@db.d.o user, redirect 2 people to the listmasters, redirect 1 person to Debian Pure Blends, redirect 1 user to a service admin and redirect 2 users to support
  • Debian packages site: deploy my ports/cruft changes
  • Debian wiki: poke at HP page history and advise a contributor, whitelist 13 email address, whitelist 1 domain, check out history of a banned IP, direct 1 hoster to DebConf17 sponsors team, direct 1 user to OpenStack packaging, direct 1 user to InstallingDebianOn and h-node.org, direct 2 users to different ways to help Debian and direct 1 emeritus DD on repository wiki page reorganisation
  • Debian QA: fix an issue with the PTS news, remove some debugging cruft I left behind, fix the usertags on a QA bug and deploy some code fixes
  • Debian mentors: security upgrades and service restarts
  • Openmoko: security upgrades and reboots

Communication

Sponsors The valgrind backport, samba and libthrift-perl bug reports were sponsored by my employer. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

15 December 2016

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 85 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday December 4 and Saturday December 10 2016: Toolchain development and fixes Anders Kaseorg opened a pull request to asciidoc upstream, to make it generate reproducible documentation. (#782294) Bugs filed Chris Lamb: Clint Adams: Dafydd Harries: Robbie Harwood: Valerie R Young: Reviews of unreproducible packages 47 package reviews have been added, 84 have been updated and 3 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. 1 new issue type has been added: lessc_captures_build_path Weekly QA work During our reproducibility testing, some FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by: diffoscope development Chris Lamb fixed a division-by-zero in the progress bar, split out trydiffoscope into a separate package, and made some performance enhancements. Maria Glukhova fixed build issues with Python 3.4 strip-nondeterminism development Anders Kaseorg added support for .par files, by allowing them to be treated as Zip archives; and Chris Lamb improved some documentation. reprotest development Ximin Luo added the ability to vary the build time using faketime, as well as other code quality improvements and cleanups. He also discovered a little-known fact about faketime - that it also modifies filesystem timestamps by default. He submitted a PR to libfaketime upstream to improve the documentation on this, which was quickly accepted, and also disabled this feature in reprotest's own usage of faketime. buildinfo.debian.net development There was further work on buildinfo.debian.net code. Chris Lamb added support for buildinfo format 0.2 and made rejection notices clearer; and Emanuel Bronshtein fixed some links to use HTTPS. Misc. This week's edition was written by Ximin Luo and reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC and via email.

12 December 2016

Kees Cook: security things in Linux v4.9

Previously: v4.8. Here are a bunch of security things I m excited about in the newly released Linux v4.9: Latent Entropy GCC plugin Building on her earlier work to bring GCC plugin support to the Linux kernel, Emese Revfy ported PaX s Latent Entropy GCC plugin to upstream. This plugin is significantly more complex than the others that have already been ported, and performs extensive instrumentation of functions marked with __latent_entropy. These functions have their branches and loops adjusted to mix random values (selected at build time) into a global entropy gathering variable. Since the branch and loop ordering is very specific to boot conditions, CPU quirks, memory layout, etc, this provides some additional uncertainty to the kernel s entropy pool. Since the entropy actually gathered is hard to measure, no entropy is credited , but rather used to mix the existing pool further. Probably the best place to enable this plugin is on small devices without other strong sources of entropy. vmapped kernel stack and thread_info relocation on x86 Normally, kernel stacks are mapped together in memory. This meant that attackers could use forms of stack exhaustion (or stack buffer overflows) to reach past the end of a stack and start writing over another process s stack. This is bad, and one way to stop it is to provide guard pages between stacks, which is provided by vmalloced memory. Andy Lutomirski did a bunch of work to move to vmapped kernel stack via CONFIG_VMAP_STACK on x86_64. Now when writing past the end of the stack, the kernel will immediately fault instead of just continuing to blindly write. Related to this, the kernel was storing thread_info (which contained sensitive values like addr_limit) at the bottom of the kernel stack, which was an easy target for attackers to hit. Between a combination of explicitly moving targets out of thread_info, removing needless fields, and entirely moving thread_info off the stack, Andy Lutomirski and Linus Torvalds created CONFIG_THREAD_INFO_IN_TASK for x86. CONFIG_DEBUG_RODATA mandatory on arm64 As recently done for x86, Mark Rutland made CONFIG_DEBUG_RODATA mandatory on arm64. This feature controls whether the kernel enforces proper memory protections on its own memory regions (code memory is executable and read-only, read-only data is actually read-only and non-executable, and writable data is non-executable). This protection is a fundamental security primitive for kernel self-protection, so there s no reason to make the protection optional. random_page() cleanup Cleaning up the code around the userspace ASLR implementations makes them easier to reason about. This has been happening for things like the recent consolidation on arch_mmap_rnd() for ET_DYN and during the addition of the entropy sysctl. Both uncovered some awkward uses of get_random_int() (or similar) in and around arch_mmap_rnd() (which is used for mmap (and therefore shared library) and PIE ASLR), as well as in randomize_stack_top() (which is used for stack ASLR). Jason Cooper cleaned things up further by doing away with randomize_range() entirely and replacing it with the saner random_page(), making the per-architecture arch_randomize_brk() (responsible for brk ASLR) much easier to understand. That s it for now! Let me know if there are other fun things to call attention to in v4.9.

2016, Kees Cook. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.
Creative Commons License

5 December 2016

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 84 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday November 27 and Saturday December 3 2016: Reproducible work in other projects Media coverage, etc. Bugs filed Chris Lamb: Clint Adams: Dafydd Harries: Daniel Shahaf: Reiner Herrmann: Valerie R Young: Reviews of unreproducible packages 15 package reviews have been added, 4 have been updated and 26 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. 2 issue types have been added: Weekly QA work During our reproducibility testing, some FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by: diffoscope development Is is available now in Debian, Archlinux and on PyPI. strip-nondeterminism development reprotest development tests.reproducible-builds.org Misc. This week's edition was written by Chris Lamb, Valerie Young, Vagrant Cascadian, Holger Levsen and reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC.

1 October 2016

Kees Cook: security things in Linux v4.6

Previously: v4.5. The v4.6 Linux kernel release included a bunch of stuff, with much more of it under the KSPP umbrella. seccomp support for parisc Helge Deller added seccomp support for parisc, which including plumbing support for PTRACE_GETREGSET to get the self-tests working. x86 32-bit mmap ASLR vs unlimited stack fixed Hector Marco-Gisbert removed a long-standing limitation to mmap ASLR on 32-bit x86, where setting an unlimited stack (e.g. ulimit -s unlimited ) would turn off mmap ASLR (which provided a way to bypass ASLR when executing setuid processes). Given that ASLR entropy can now be controlled directly (see the v4.5 post), and that the cases where this created an actual problem are very rare, means that if a system sees collisions between unlimited stack and mmap ASLR, they can just adjust the 32-bit ASLR entropy instead. x86 execute-only memory Dave Hansen added Protection Key support for future x86 CPUs and, as part of this, implemented support for execute only memory in user-space. On pkeys-supporting CPUs, using mmap(..., PROT_EXEC) (i.e. without PROT_READ) will mean that the memory can be executed but cannot be read (or written). This provides some mitigation against automated ROP gadget finding where an executable is read out of memory to find places that can be used to build a malicious execution path. Using this will require changing some linker behavior (to avoid putting data in executable areas), but seems to otherwise Just Work. I m looking forward to either emulated QEmu support or access to one of these fancy CPUs. CONFIG_DEBUG_RODATA enabled by default on arm and arm64, and mandatory on x86 Ard Biesheuvel (arm64) and I (arm) made the poorly-named CONFIG_DEBUG_RODATA enabled by default. This feature controls whether the kernel enforces proper memory protections on its own memory regions (code memory is executable and read-only, read-only data is actually read-only and non-executable, and writable data is non-executable). This protection is a fundamental security primitive for kernel self-protection, so making it on-by-default is required to start any kind of attack surface reduction within the kernel. On x86 CONFIG_DEBUG_RODATA was already enabled by default, but, at Ingo Molnar s suggestion, I made it mandatory: CONFIG_DEBUG_RODATA cannot be turned off on x86. I expect we ll get there with arm and arm64 too, but the protection is still somewhat new on these architectures, so it s reasonable to continue to leave an out for developers that find themselves tripping over it. arm64 KASLR text base offset Ard Biesheuvel reworked a ton of arm64 infrastructure to support kernel relocation and, building on that, Kernel Address Space Layout Randomization of the kernel text base offset (and module base offset). As with x86 text base KASLR, this is a probabilistic defense that raises the bar for kernel attacks where finding the KASLR offset must be added to the chain of exploits used for a successful attack. One big difference from x86 is that the entropy for the KASLR must come either from Device Tree (in the /chosen/kaslr-seed property) or from UEFI (via EFI_RNG_PROTOCOL), so if you re building arm64 devices, make sure you have a strong source of early-boot entropy that you can expose through your boot-firmware or boot-loader. zero-poison after free Laura Abbott reworked a bunch of the kernel memory management debugging code to add zeroing of freed memory, similar to PaX/Grsecurity s PAX_MEMORY_SANITIZE feature. This feature means that memory is cleared at free, wiping any sensitive data so it doesn t have an opportunity to leak in various ways (e.g. accidentally uninitialized structures or padding), and that certain types of use-after-free flaws cannot be exploited since the memory has been wiped. To take things even a step further, the poisoning can be verified at allocation time to make sure that nothing wrote to it between free and allocation (called sanity checking ), which can catch another small subset of flaws. To understand the pieces of this, it s worth describing that the kernel s higher level allocator, the page allocator (e.g. __get_free_pages()) is used by the finer-grained slab allocator (e.g. kmem_cache_alloc(), kmalloc()). Poisoning is handled separately in both allocators. The zero-poisoning happens at the page allocator level. Since the slab allocators tend to do their own allocation/freeing, their poisoning happens separately (since on slab free nothing has been freed up to the page allocator). Only limited performance tuning has been done, so the penalty is rather high at the moment, at about 9% when doing a kernel build workload. Future work will include some exclusion of frequently-freed caches (similar to PAX_MEMORY_SANITIZE), and making the options entirely CONFIG controlled (right now both CONFIGs are needed to build in the code, and a kernel command line is needed to activate it). Performing the sanity checking (mentioned above) adds another roughly 3% penalty. In the general case (and once the performance of the poisoning is improved), the security value of the sanity checking isn t worth the performance trade-off. Tests for the features can be found in lkdtm as READ_AFTER_FREE and READ_BUDDY_AFTER_FREE. If you re feeling especially paranoid and have enabled sanity-checking, WRITE_AFTER_FREE and WRITE_BUDDY_AFTER_FREE can test these as well. To perform zero-poisoning of page allocations and (currently non-zero) poisoning of slab allocations, build with:
CONFIG_DEBUG_PAGEALLOC=n
CONFIG_PAGE_POISONING=y
CONFIG_PAGE_POISONING_NO_SANITY=y
CONFIG_PAGE_POISONING_ZERO=y
CONFIG_SLUB_DEBUG=y
and enable the page allocator poisoning and slab allocator poisoning at boot with this on the kernel command line:
page_poison=on slub_debug=P
To add sanity-checking, change PAGE_POISONING_NO_SANITY=n, and add F to slub_debug as slub_debug=PF . read-only after init I added the infrastructure to support making certain kernel memory read-only after kernel initialization (inspired by a small part of PaX/Grsecurity s KERNEXEC functionality). The goal is to continue to reduce the attack surface within the kernel by making even more of the memory, especially function pointer tables, read-only (which depends on CONFIG_DEBUG_RODATA above). Function pointer tables (and similar structures) are frequently targeted by attackers when redirecting execution. While many are already declared const in the kernel source code, making them read-only (and therefore unavailable to attackers) for their entire lifetime, there is a class of variables that get initialized during kernel (and module) start-up (i.e. written to during functions that are marked __init ) and then never (intentionally) written to again. Some examples are things like the VDSO, vector tables, arch-specific callbacks, etc. As it turns out, most architectures with kernel memory protection already delay making their data read-only until after __init (see mark_rodata_ro()), so it s trivial to declare a new data section ( .data..ro_after_init ) and add it to the existing read-only data section ( .rodata ). Kernel structures can be annotated with the new section (via the __ro_after_init macro), and they ll become read-only once boot has finished. The next step for attack surface reduction infrastructure will be to create a kernel memory region that is passively read-only, but can be made temporarily writable (by a single un-preemptable CPU), for storing sensitive structures that are written to only very rarely. Once this is done, much more of the kernel s attack surface can be made read-only for the majority of its lifetime. As people identify places where __ro_after_init can be used, we can grow the protection. A good place to start is to look through the PaX/Grsecurity patch to find uses of __read_only on variables that are only written to during __init functions. The rest are places that will need the temporarily-writable infrastructure (PaX/Grsecurity uses pax_open_kernel()/pax_close_kernel() for these). That s it for v4.6, next up will be v4.7!

2016, Kees Cook. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.
Creative Commons License

19 September 2016

Mike Gabriel: Rocrail changed License to some dodgy non-free non-License

The Background Story A year ago, or so, I took some time to search the internet for Free Software that can be used for controlling model railways via a computer. I was happy to find Rocrail [1] being one of only a few applications available on the market. And even more, I was very happy when I saw that it had been licensed under a Free Software license: GPL-3(+). A month ago, or so, I collected my old M rklin (Digital) stuff from my parents' place and started looking into it again after +15 years, together with my little son. Some weeks ago, I remembered Rocrail and thought... Hey, this software was GPLed code and absolutely suitable for uploading to Debian and/or Ubuntu. I searched for the Rocrail source code and figured out that it got hidden from the web some time in 2015 and that the license obviously has been changed to some non-free license (I could not figure out what license, though). This made me very sad! I thought I had found a piece of software that might be interesting for testing with my model railway. Whenever I stumble over some nice piece of Free Software that I plan to use (or even only play with), I upload this to Debian as one of the first steps. However, I highly attempt to stay away from non-free sofware, so Rocrail has become a no-option for me back in 2015. I should have moved on from here on... Instead... Proactively, I signed up with the Rocrail forum and asked the author(s) if they see any chance of re-licensing the Rocrail code under GPL (or any other FLOSS license) again [2]? When I encounter situations like this, I normally offer my expertise and help with such licensing stuff for free. My impression until here already was that something strange must have happened in the past, so that software developers choose GPL and later on stepped back from that decision and from then on have been hiding the source code from the web entirely. Going deeper... The Rocrail project's wiki states that anyone can request GitBlit access via the forum and obtain the source code via Git for local build purposes only. Nice! So, I asked for access to the project's Git repository, which I had been granted. Thanks for that. Trivial Source Code Investigation... So far so good. I investigated the source code (well, only the license meta stuff shipped with the source code...) and found that the main COPYING files (found at various locations in the source tree, containing a full version of the GPL-3 license) had been replaced by this text:
Copyright (c) 2002 Robert Jan Versluis, Rocrail.net
All rights reserved.
Commercial usage needs permission.
The replacement happened with these Git commits:
commit cfee35f3ae5973e97a3d4b178f20eb69a916203e
Author: Rob Versluis <r.j.versluis@rocrail.net>
Date:   Fri Jul 17 16:09:45 2015 +0200
    update copyrights
commit df399d9d4be05799d4ae27984746c8b600adb20b
Author: Rob Versluis <r.j.versluis@rocrail.net>
Date:   Wed Jul 8 14:49:12 2015 +0200
    update licence
commit 0daffa4b8d3dc13df95ef47e0bdd52e1c2c58443
Author: Rob Versluis <r.j.versluis@rocrail.net>
Date:   Wed Jul 8 10:17:13 2015 +0200
    update
Getting in touch again, still being really interested and wanting to help... As I consider such a non-license as really dangerous when distributing any sort of software, be it Free or non-free Software, I posted the below text on the Rocrail forum:
Hi Rob,
I just stumbled over this post [3] [link reference adapted for this
blog post), which probably is the one you have referred to above.
It seems that Rocrail contains features that require a key or such
for permanent activation.  Basically, this is allowed and possible
even with the GPL-3+ (although Free Software activists will  not
appreciate that). As the GPL states that people can share the source
code, programmers can  easily deactivate license key checks (and
such) in the code and re-distribute that patchset as they  like.
Furthermore, the current COPYING file is really non-protective at
all. It does not really protect   you as copyright holder of the
code. Meaning, if people crash their trains with your software, you  
could actually be legally prosecuted for that. In theory. Or in the
U.S. ( ;-) ). Main reason for  having a long long license text is to
protect you as the author in case your software causes t trouble to
other people. You do not have any warranty disclaimer in your COPYING
file or elsewhere. Really not a good idea.
In that referenced post above, someone also writes about the nuisance
of license discussions in  this forum. I have seen various cases
where people produced software and did not really care for 
licensing. Some ended with a letter from a lawyer, some with some BIG
company using their code  under their copyright holdership and their
own commercial licensing scheme. This is not paranoia,  this is what
happens in the Free Software world from time to time.
A model that might be much more appropriate (and more protective to
you as the author), maybe, is a  dual release scheme for the code. A
possible approach could be to split Rocrail into two editions:  
Community Edition and Professional/Commercial Edition. The Community
Edition must be licensed in a  way that it allows re-using the code
in a closed-source, non-free version of Rocrail (e.g.   MIT/Expat
License or Apache2.0 License). Thus, the code base belonging to the
community edition  would be licensed, say..., as Apache-2.0 and for
the extra features in the Commercial Edition, you  may use any
non-free license you want (but please not that COPYING file you have
now, it really  does not protect your copyright holdership).
The reason for releasing (a reduced set of features of a) software as
Free Software is to extend  the user base. The honey jar effect, as
practise by many huge FLOSS projects (e.g. Owncloud,  GitLab, etc.).
If people could install Rocrail from the Debian / Ubuntu archives
directly, I am  sure that the user base of Rocrail will increase.
There may also be developers popping up showing  an interest in
Rocrail (e.g. like me). However, I know many FLOSS developers (e.g.
like me) that  won't waste their free time on working for a non-free
piece of software (without being paid).
If you follow (or want to follow) a business model with Rocrail, then
keep some interesting  features in the Commercial Edition and don't
ship that source code. People with deep interest may  opt for that.
Furthermore, another option could be dual licensing the code. As the
copyright holder of Rocrail  you are free to juggle with licenses and
apply any license to a release you want. For example, this  can be
interesing for a free-again Rocrail being shipped via Apple's iStore. 
Last but not least, as you ship the complete source code with all
previous changes as a Git project  to those who request GitBlit
access, it is possible to obtain all earlier versions of Rocrail. In 
the mail I received with my GitBlit credentials, there was some text
that  prohibits publishing the  code. Fine. But: (in theory) it is
not forbidden to share the code with a friend, for local usage.  This
friend finds the COPYING file, frowns and rewinds back to 2015 where
the license was still  GPL-3+. GPL-3+ code can be shared with anyone
and also published, so this friend could upload the  2015-version of
Rocrail to Github or such and start to work on a free fork. You also
may not want  this.
Thanks for working on this piece of software! It is highly
interesing, and I am still sad, that it  does not come with a free
license anymore. I won't continue this discussion and move on, unless
you  are interested in any of the above information and ask for more
expertise. Ping me here or directly  via mail, if needed. If the
expertise leads to parts of Rocrail becoming Free Software again, the 
expertise is offered free of charge ;-).
light+love
Mike
Wow, the first time I got moderated somewhere... What an experience! This experience now was really new. My post got immediately removed from the forum by the main author of Rocrail (with the forum's moderator's hat on). The new experience was: I got really angry when I discovererd having been moderated. Wow! Really a powerful emotion. No harassment in my words, no secrets disclosed, and still... my free speech got suppressed by someone. That feels intense! And it only occurred in the virtual realm, not face to face. Wow!!! I did not expect such intensity... The reason for wiping my post without any other communication was given as below and quite a statement to frown upon (this post has also been "moderately" removed from the forum thread [2] a bit later today):
Mike,
I think its not a good idea to point out a way to get the sources back to the GPL periode.
Therefore I deleted your posting.
(The phpBB forum software also allows moderators to edit posts, so the critical passage could have been removed instead, but immediately wiping the full message, well...). Also, just wiping my post and not replying otherwise with some apology to suppress my words, really is a no-go. And the reason for wiping the rest of the text... Any Git user can easily figure out how to get a FLOSS version of Rocrail and continue to work on that from then on. Really. Now the political part of this blog post... Fortunately, I still live in an area of the world where the right of free speech is still present. I found out: I really don't like being moderated!!! Esp. if what I share / propose is really noooo secret at all. Anyone who knows how to use Git can come to the same conclusion as I have come to this morning. [Off-topic, not at all related to Rocrail: The last votes here in Germany indicate that some really stupid folks here yearn for another this time highly idiotic wind of change, where free speech may end up as a precious good.] To other (Debian) Package Maintainers and Railroad Enthusiasts... With this blog post I probably close the last option for Rocrail going FLOSS again. Personally, I think that gate was already closed before I got in touch. Now really moving on... Probably the best approach for my new train conductor hobby (as already recommended by the woman at my side some weeks back) is to leave the laptop lid closed when switching on the train control units. I should have listened to her much earlier. I have finally removed the Rocrail source code from my computer again without building and testing the application. I neither have shared the source code with anyone. Neither have I shared the Git URL with anyone. I really think that FLOSS enthusiasts should stay away from this software for now. For my part, I have lost my interest in this completely... References light+love,
Mike

31 August 2016

Chris Lamb: Free software activities in August 2016

Here is my monthly update covering what I have been doing in the free software world (previously):

Reproducible builds

Whilst anyone can inspect the source code of free software for malicious flaws, most Linux distributions provide binary (or "compiled") packages to end users. The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to allow verification that no flaws have been introduced either maliciously and accidentally during this compilation process by promising identical binary packages are always generated from a given source.

Diffoscope diffoscope is our "diff on steroids" that will not only recursively unpack archives but will transform binary formats into human-readable forms in order to compare them:
  • Added a command-line interface to the try.diffoscope.org web service.
  • Added a JSON comparator.
  • In the HTML output, highlight lines when hovering to make it easier to visually track.
  • Ensure that we pass str types to our Difference class, otherwise we can't be sure we can render them later.
  • Testsuite improvements:
    • Generate test coverage reports.
    • Add tests for Haskell and GitIndex comparators.
    • Completely refactored all of the comparator tests, extracting out commonly-used routines.
    • Confirm rendering of text and HTML presenters when checking non-existing files.
    • Dropped a squashfs test as it was simply too unreliable and/or has too many requirements to satisfy.
  • A large number of miscellaneous cleanups, including:
    • Reworking the comparator setup/preference internals by dynamically importing classes via a single list.
    • Split exceptions out into dedicated diffoscope.exc module.
    • Tidying the PROVIDERS dict in diffoscope/__init__.py.
    • Use html.escape over xml.sax.saxutils.escape, cgi.escape, etc.
    • Removing hard-coding of manual page targets names in debian/rules.
    • Specify all string format arguments as logging function parameters, not using interpolation.
    • Tidying imports, correcting indentation levels and drop unnecessary whitespace.

disorderfs disorderfs is our FUSE filesystem that deliberately introduces nondeterminism in system calls such as readdir(3).
  • Added a testsuite to prevent regressions. (f124965)
  • Added a --sort-dirents=yes no option for forcing deterministic ordering. (2aae325)

Other
  • Improved strip-nondeterminism, our tool to remove specific nondeterministic information after a build:
    • Match more styles of Java .properties files.
    • Remove hyphen from "non-determinism" and "non-deterministic" throughout package for consistency.
  • Improvements to our testing infrastucture:
    • Improve the top-level navigation so that we can always get back to "home" of a package.
    • Give expandable elements cursor: pointer CSS styling to highlight they are clickable.
    • Drop various trailing underlined whitespaces after links.
    • Explicitly log that build was successful or not.
    • Various code-quality improvements, including prefering str.format over concatentation.
  • Miscellaneous updates to our filter-packages internal tool:
    • Add --random=N and --url options.
    • Add support for --show=comments.
    • Correct ordering so that --show-version runs after --filter-ftbfs.
    • Rename --show-ftbfs to --filter-ftbfs and --show-version to --show=version.
  • Created a proof-of-concept reproducible-utils package to contain commonly-used snippets aimed at developers wishing to make their packages reproducible.


I also submitted 92 patches to fix specific reproducibility issues in advi, amora-server, apt-cacher-ng, ara, argyll, audiotools, bam, bedtools, binutils-m68hc1x, botan1.10, broccoli, congress, cookiecutter, dacs, dapl, dateutils, ddd, dicom3tools, dispcalgui, dnssec-trigger, echoping, eekboek, emacspeak, eyed3, fdroidserver, flashrom, fntsample, forkstat, gkrellm, gkrellm, gnunet-gtk, handbrake, hardinfo, ircd-irc2, ircd-ircu, jack-audio-connection-kit, jpy, kxmlgui, libbson, libdc0, libdevel-cover-perl, libfm, libpam-ldap, libquvi, librep, lilyterm, mozvoikko, mp4h, mp4v2, myghty, n2n, nagios-nrpe, nikwi, nmh, nsnake, openhackware, pd-pdstring, phpab, phpdox, phpldapadmin, pixelmed-codec, pleiades, pybit, pygtksourceview, pyicu, python-attrs, python-gflags, quvi, radare2, rc, rest2web, roaraudio, rt-extension-customfieldsonupdate, ruby-compass, ruby-pg, sheepdog, tf5, ttf-tiresias, ttf-tiresias, tuxpaint, tuxpaint-config, twitter-bootstrap3, udpcast, uhub, valknut, varnish, vips, vit, wims, winswitch, wmweather+ & xshisen.

Debian GNU/Linux
Debian LTS

This month I have been paid to work 15 hours on Debian Long Term Support (LTS). In that time I did the following:
  • "Frontdesk" duties, triaging CVEs, etc.
  • Authored the patch & issued DLA 596-1 for extplorer, a web-based file manager, fixing an archive traversal exploit.
  • Issued DLA 598-1 for suckless-tools, fixing a segmentation fault in the slock screen locking tool.
  • Issued DLA 599-1 for cracklib2, a pro-active password checker library, fixing a stack-based buffer overflow when parsing large GECOS fields.
  • Improved the find-work internal tool adding optional colour highlighting and migrating it to Python 3.
  • Wrote an lts-missing-uploads tool to find mistakes where there was no correponding package in the archive after an announcement.
  • Added optional colour highlighting to the lts-cve-triage tool.

Uploads
  • redis 2:3.2.3-1 New upstream release, move to the DEP-5 debian/copyright format, ensure that we are running as root in LSB initscripts and add a README.Source regarding our local copies of redis.conf and sentinel.conf.
  • python-django:
    • 1:1.10-1 New upstream release.
    • 1:1.10-2 Fix test failures due to mishandled upstream translation updates.

  • gunicorn:
    • 19.6.0-2 Reload logrotate in the postrotate action to avoid processes writing to the old files and move to DEP-5 debian/copyright format.
    • 19.6.0-3 Drop our /usr/sbin/gunicorn ,3 -debian and related Debian-specific machinery to be more like upstream.
    • 19.6.0-4 Drop "template" systemd .service files and point towards examples and documentation instead.

  • adminer:
    • 4.2.5-1 Take over package maintenance, completely overhauling the packaging with a new upstream version, move to virtual-mysql-server to support MariaDB, updating package names of dependencies and fix the outdated Apache configuration.
    • 4.2.5-2 Correct the php5 package names.




FTP Team As a Debian FTP assistant I ACCEPTed 90 packages: android-platform-external-jsilver, android-platform-frameworks-data-binding, camlpdf, consolation, dfwinreg, diffoscope, django-restricted-resource, django-testproject, django-testscenarios, gitlab-ci-multi-runner, gnome-shell-extension-taskbar, golang-github-flynn-archive-go-shlex, golang-github-jamesclonk-vultr, golang-github-weppos-dnsimple-go, golang-golang-x-time, google-android-ndk-installer, haskell-expiring-cache-map, haskell-hclip, haskell-hdbc-session, haskell-microlens-ghc, haskell-names-th, haskell-persistable-record, haskell-should-not-typecheck, haskell-soap, haskell-soap-tls, haskell-th-reify-compat, haskell-with-location, haskell-wreq, kbtin, libclipboard-perl, libgtk3-simplelist-perl, libjs-jquery-selectize.js, liblemon, libplack-middleware-header-perl, libreoffice, libreswan, libtest-deep-json-perl, libtest-timer-perl, linux, linux-signed, live-tasks, llvm-toolchain-3.8, llvm-toolchain-snapshot, lua-luv, lua-torch-image, lua-torch-nn, magic-wormhole, mini-buildd, ncbi-vdb, node-ast-util, node-es6-module-transpiler, node-es6-promise, node-inline-source-map, node-number-is-nan, node-object-assign, nvidia-graphics-drivers, openhft-chronicle-bytes, openhft-chronicle-core, openhft-chronicle-network, openhft-chronicle-threads, openhft-chronicle-wire, pycodestyle, python-aptly, python-atomicwrites, python-click-log, python-django-casclient, python-git-os-job, python-hypothesis, python-nosehtmloutput, python-overpy, python-parsel, python-prov, python-py, python-schema, python-tackerclient, python-tornado, pyvo, r-cran-cairo, r-cran-mi, r-cran-rcppgsl, r-cran-sem, ruby-curses, ruby-fog-rackspace, ruby-mixlib-archive, ruby-tzinfo-data, salt-formula-swift, scapy3k, self-destructing-cookies, trollius-redis & websploit.

25 July 2016

Norbert Preining: TUG 2016 Day 0 Books and Beers

The second pre-conference day was dedicated to books and beers, with a visit to an exquisite print studio, and a beer tasting session at one of the craft breweries in Canada. In addition we could grab a view into the Canadian lifestyle by visiting Pavneet s beautiful house in the countryside, as well as enjoying traditional style pastries from a bakery.
Heidelberg printing machine at Porcupine's quilt
In short, a perfect combination for us typography and beer savvy freaks! This morning we had somehow an early start from the hotel. Soon the bus left downtown Toronto and entered countryside Ontario, large landscapes filled with huge (for my Japanese feeling) estates and houses, separated by fields, forests and wild landscape. Very beautiful and inviting to live there. On our way to the printing workshop we stopped at Pavneet s house for a very short visit of the exterior, which includes mathematics in the bricking. According to Pavneet, his kids hate to see math on the wall I would be proud to have it.
Pavneet's house is hiding some mathematics
A bit further on we entered into Erin, where the Porcupine s Quill is located. A small building along the street, one could easily oversee that rare jewel! In addition considering that according to the owners, Google Maps has a bad error which would lead you to a completely different location. This printing workshop, led by Tim and Elke Inkster, is producing books in a traditional style using an old Heidelberg Offset printing machine.
Entrance to the Porcupine's Quill, a local bookshop doing excellent printing
Elke introduced us to the sewing of folded signatures together with a lovely old sewing machine. It was the first time I actually saw one in action.
Sewn signatures
Tim, the head master of the printing shop, first entertained us with stories about Chinese publishers visiting them in the old cold-war times, before diving into explanations of the actual machines around, like the Heidelberg offset printing machine.
Master Tim is showing us offset technique
In the back of the basement of the little studio there is also a huge folding machine, which cuts up the big signatures of 16 pages and folds them into bundles. An impressive example of tricky engineering.
The folding machine creates from a printed signature 16 pages in proper order.
Due to the small size of the printing studio, our groups were actually split into two groups, and while the other group got its guided tour, we grabbed coffee and traditional cookies and pastries from the nearby Holtom s bakery. Loads of nice pastries with various filling, my favorite being the slightly salty cherry pie, and above all the rhubarb-raspberry pie.
Nearby old-style bakery, selling Viennese-style "Kaisersemmel", calling them "Kaiser buns". There must be an Austrian hiding somewhere around.
To my absolute astonishment I also found there a Viennese Kaisersemmel , called Kaiser bun here, but keeping the shape and the idea (but unfortunately not the crispy cracky quality of the original in Vienna). Of course I got two of them, together with a nice jam from the region, and enjoyed these Viennese breakfast the next day morning.
Viennese breakfast from the Bakery near Porcupine's Quill
Leaving the Quill we headed for a lunch in a nice pizzeria (I got Pizza Toscana) which also served excellent local beer how would I like to have something like this over in Japan! Our last stop on this excursion was Stone Hammer Brewery, ne of the most famous craft breweries in Canada.
One of the top craft breweries in Canada, the Stone Hammer
keep-calmAlthough they wont win a prize for typography (besides one page of a coaster there that carried a nice pun), their beers are exquisite. We got five different beers to taste, plus extensive explanations on brewing methods and differences. Now I finally understand why most of the new craft breweries in Japan are making Ales: Ales don t need a long process and are ready for sale in rather short time, compared to e.g. lagers.)
Explanations of the the secrets of beer brewing
Nothing to add to this poster found in the Stone Hammer Brewery!
Also at the Stone Hammer Brewery I spotted this very nice poster on the wall of the toilet. And I cannot agree more, everything can easily be discussed over a good beer it calms down aversions, makes even the worst enemies friends, and is healthy for both the mind and body. Filled with excellent beer, some of us (notably an unnamed US TeXnician and politician), stacked up on beers to carry home. I was very tempted to get a huge batch, but putting cans into an airplane seems to be not the optimal idea. Since we are talking cans, I was surprised to hear that many craft beer brewers nowadays prefer cans due to their better protection of the beer from light and oxygen, both killers of good beer. Before leaving we took a last look at the Periodic Table of Beer Types, which left me in awe about how much I don t know and I probably never will know. In particular, I heard the first time of a Vienna style beer Vienna is not really famous for beer, better to say, it is infamous. So maybe this is a different Vienna than my home town that is meant here.
Lots to study here, the Periodic Table of Beers
Another two hour bus ride brought us back to Toronto, where we met with other participants at the reception in a restaurant of Mediterranean cuisine, where I could enjoy for the first time in years a good Tahina and Humus. All around another excellent day, now I only would like to have two days of holidays, guess I need to relax in the lectures starting from tomorrow.

20 July 2016

Daniel Pocock: How many mobile phone accounts will be hijacked this summer?

Summer vacations have been getting tougher in recent years. Airlines cut into your precious vacation time with their online check-in procedures and a dozen reminder messages, there is growing concern about airport security and Brexit has already put one large travel firm into liquidation leaving holidaymakers in limbo. If that wasn't all bad enough, now there is a new threat: while you are relaxing in the sun, scammers fool your phone company into issuing a replacement SIM card or transferring your mobile number to a new provider and then proceed to use it to take over all your email, social media, Paypal and bank accounts. The same scam has been appearing around the globe, from Britain to Australia and everywhere in between. Many of these scams were predicted in my earlier blog SMS logins: an illusion of security (April 2014) but they are only starting to get publicity now as more aspects of our lives are at risk, scammers are ramping up their exploits and phone companies are floundering under the onslaught. With the vast majority of Internet users struggling to keep their passwords out of the wrong hands, many organizations have started offering their customers the option of receiving two-factor authentication codes on their mobile phone during login. Rather than making people safer, this has simply given scammers an incentive to seize control of telephones, usually by tricking the phone company to issue a replacement SIM or port the number. It also provides a fresh incentive for criminals to steal phones while cybercriminals have been embedding code into many "free" apps to surreptitiously re-route the text messages and gather other data they need for an identity theft sting. Sadly, telephone networks were never designed for secure transactions. Telecoms experts have made this clear numerous times. Some of the largest scams in the history of financial services exploited phone verification protocols as the weakest link in the chain, including a $150 million heist reminiscent of Ocean's 11. For phone companies, SMS messaging came as a side-effect of digital communications for mobile handsets. It is less than one percent of their business. SMS authentication is less than one percent of that. Phone companies lose little or nothing when SMS messages are hijacked so there is little incentive for them to secure it. Nonetheless, like insects riding on an elephant, numerous companies have popped up with a business model that involves linking websites to the wholesale telephone network and dressing it up as a "security" solution. These companies are able to make eye-watering profits by "purchasing" text messages for $0.01 and selling them for $0.02 (one hundred percent gross profit), but they also have nothing to lose when SIM cards are hijacked and therefore minimal incentive to take any responsibility. Companies like Google, Facebook and Twitter have thrown more fuel on the fire by encouraging and sometimes even demanding users provide mobile phone numbers to "prove they are human" or "protect" their accounts. Through these antics, these high profile companies have given a vast percentage of the population a false sense of confidence in codes delivered by mobile phone, yet the real motivation for these companies does not appear to be security at all: they have worked out that the mobile phone number is the holy grail in cross-referencing vast databases of users and customers from different sources for all sorts of creepy purposes. As most of their services don't involve any financial activity, they have little to lose if accounts are compromised and everything to gain by accurately gathering mobile phone numbers from as many users as possible.
Can you escape your mobile phone while on vacation? Just how hard is it to get a replacement SIM card or transfer/port a user's phone number while they are on vacation? Many phone companies will accept instructions through a web form or a phone call. Scammers need little more than a user's full name, home address and date of birth: vast lists of these private details are circulating on the black market, sourced from social media, data breaches (99% of which are never detected or made public), marketing companies and even the web sites that encourage your friends to send you free online birthday cards. Every time a company has asked me to use mobile phone authentication so far, I've opted out and I'll continue to do so. Even if somebody does hijack my phone account while I'm on vacation, the consequences for me are minimal as it will not give them access to any other account or service, can you and your family members say the same thing? What can be done?
  • Opt-out of mobile phone authentication schemes.
  • Never give the mobile phone number to web sites unless there is a real and pressing need for them to call you.
  • Tell firms you don't have a mobile phone or that you share your phone with your family and can't use it for private authentication.
  • If you need to use two-factor authentication, only use technical solutions such as smart cards or security tokens that have been engineered exclusively for computer security. Leave them in a locked drawer or safe while on vacation. Be wary of anybody who insists on SMS and doesn't offer these other options.
  • Rather than seeking to "protect" accounts, simply close some or all social media accounts to reduce your exposure and eliminate the effort of keeping them "secure" and updating "privacy" settings.
  • If your bank provides a relationship manager or other personal contact, this
    can also provide a higher level of security as they get to know you.
Previous blogs on SMS messaging, security and two factor authentication, including my earlier blog SMS Logins: an illusion of security.

19 June 2016

Paul Tagliamonte: Go Debian!

As some of the world knows full well by now, I've been noodling with Go for a few years, working through its pros, its cons, and thinking a lot about how humans use code to express thoughts and ideas. Go's got a lot of neat use cases, suited to particular problems, and used in the right place, you can see some clear massive wins. I've started writing Debian tooling in Go, because it's a pretty natural fit. Go's fairly tight, and overhead shouldn't be taken up by your operating system. After a while, I wound up hitting the usual blockers, and started to build up abstractions. They became pretty darn useful, so, this blog post is announcing (a still incomplete, year old and perhaps API changing) Debian package for Go. The Go importable name is pault.ag/go/debian. This contains a lot of utilities for dealing with Debian packages, and will become an edited down "toolbelt" for working with or on Debian packages. Module Overview Currently, the package contains 4 major sub packages. They're a changelog parser, a control file parser, deb file format parser, dependency parser and a version parser. Together, these are a set of powerful building blocks which can be used together to create higher order systems with reliable understandings of the world. changelog The first (and perhaps most incomplete and least tested) is a changelog file parser.. This provides the programmer with the ability to pull out the suite being targeted in the changelog, when each upload was, and the version for each. For example, let's look at how we can pull when all the uploads of Docker to sid took place:
func main()  
    resp, err := http.Get("http://metadata.ftp-master.debian.org/changelogs/main/d/docker.io/unstable_changelog")
    if err != nil  
        panic(err)
     
    allEntries, err := changelog.Parse(resp.Body)
    if err != nil  
        panic(err)
     
    for _, entry := range allEntries  
        fmt.Printf("Version %s was uploaded on %s\n", entry.Version, entry.When)
     
 
The output of which looks like:
Version 1.8.3~ds1-2 was uploaded on 2015-11-04 00:09:02 -0800 -0800
Version 1.8.3~ds1-1 was uploaded on 2015-10-29 19:40:51 -0700 -0700
Version 1.8.2~ds1-2 was uploaded on 2015-10-29 07:23:10 -0700 -0700
Version 1.8.2~ds1-1 was uploaded on 2015-10-28 14:21:00 -0700 -0700
Version 1.7.1~dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2015-08-26 10:13:48 -0700 -0700
Version 1.6.2~dfsg1-2 was uploaded on 2015-07-01 07:45:19 -0600 -0600
Version 1.6.2~dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2015-05-21 00:47:43 -0600 -0600
Version 1.6.1+dfsg1-2 was uploaded on 2015-05-10 13:02:54 -0400 EDT
Version 1.6.1+dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2015-05-08 17:57:10 -0600 -0600
Version 1.6.0+dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2015-05-05 15:10:49 -0600 -0600
Version 1.6.0+dfsg1-1~exp1 was uploaded on 2015-04-16 18:00:21 -0600 -0600
Version 1.6.0~rc7~dfsg1-1~exp1 was uploaded on 2015-04-15 19:35:46 -0600 -0600
Version 1.6.0~rc4~dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2015-04-06 17:11:33 -0600 -0600
Version 1.5.0~dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2015-03-10 22:58:49 -0600 -0600
Version 1.3.3~dfsg1-2 was uploaded on 2015-01-03 00:11:47 -0700 -0700
Version 1.3.3~dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2014-12-18 21:54:12 -0700 -0700
Version 1.3.2~dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2014-11-24 19:14:28 -0500 EST
Version 1.3.1~dfsg1-2 was uploaded on 2014-11-07 13:11:34 -0700 -0700
Version 1.3.1~dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2014-11-03 08:26:29 -0700 -0700
Version 1.3.0~dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2014-10-17 00:56:07 -0600 -0600
Version 1.2.0~dfsg1-2 was uploaded on 2014-10-09 00:08:11 +0000 +0000
Version 1.2.0~dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2014-09-13 11:43:17 -0600 -0600
Version 1.0.0~dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2014-06-13 21:04:53 -0400 EDT
Version 0.11.1~dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2014-05-09 17:30:45 -0400 EDT
Version 0.9.1~dfsg1-2 was uploaded on 2014-04-08 23:19:08 -0400 EDT
Version 0.9.1~dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2014-04-03 21:38:30 -0400 EDT
Version 0.9.0+dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2014-03-11 22:24:31 -0400 EDT
Version 0.8.1+dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2014-02-25 20:56:31 -0500 EST
Version 0.8.0+dfsg1-2 was uploaded on 2014-02-15 17:51:58 -0500 EST
Version 0.8.0+dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2014-02-10 20:41:10 -0500 EST
Version 0.7.6+dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2014-01-22 22:50:47 -0500 EST
Version 0.7.1+dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2014-01-15 20:22:34 -0500 EST
Version 0.6.7+dfsg1-3 was uploaded on 2014-01-09 20:10:20 -0500 EST
Version 0.6.7+dfsg1-2 was uploaded on 2014-01-08 19:14:02 -0500 EST
Version 0.6.7+dfsg1-1 was uploaded on 2014-01-07 21:06:10 -0500 EST
control Next is one of the most complex, and one of the oldest parts of go-debian, which is the control file parser (otherwise sometimes known as deb822). This module was inspired by the way that the json module works in Go, allowing for files to be defined in code with a struct. This tends to be a bit more declarative, but also winds up putting logic into struct tags, which can be a nasty anti-pattern if used too much. The first primitive in this module is the concept of a Paragraph, a struct containing two values, the order of keys seen, and a map of string to string. All higher order functions dealing with control files will go through this type, which is a helpful interchange format to be aware of. All parsing of meaning from the Control file happens when the Paragraph is unpacked into a struct using reflection. The idea behind this strategy that you define your struct, and let the Control parser handle unpacking the data from the IO into your container, letting you maintain type safety, since you never have to read and cast, the conversion will handle this, and return an Unmarshaling error in the event of failure. Additionally, Structs that define an anonymous member of control.Paragraph will have the raw Paragraph struct of the underlying file, allowing the programmer to handle dynamic tags (such as X-Foo), or at least, letting them survive the round-trip through go. The default decoder contains an argument, the ability to verify the input control file using an OpenPGP keyring, which is exposed to the programmer through the (*Decoder).Signer() function. If the passed argument is nil, it will not check the input file signature (at all!), and if it has been passed, any signed data must be found or an error will fall out of the NewDecoder call. On the way out, the opposite happens, where the struct is introspected, turned into a control.Paragraph, and then written out to the io.Writer. Here's a quick (and VERY dirty) example showing the basics of reading and writing Debian Control files with go-debian.
package main
import (
    "fmt"
    "io"
    "net/http"
    "strings"
    "pault.ag/go/debian/control"
)
type AllowedPackage struct  
    Package     string
    Fingerprint string
 
func (a *AllowedPackage) UnmarshalControl(in string) error  
    in = strings.TrimSpace(in)
    chunks := strings.SplitN(in, " ", 2)
    if len(chunks) != 2  
        return fmt.Errorf("Syntax sucks: '%s'", in)
     
    a.Package = chunks[0]
    a.Fingerprint = chunks[1][1 : len(chunks[1])-1]
    return nil
 
type DMUA struct  
    Fingerprint     string
    Uid             string
    AllowedPackages []AllowedPackage  control:"Allow" delim:"," 
 
func main()  
    resp, err := http.Get("http://metadata.ftp-master.debian.org/dm.txt")
    if err != nil  
        panic(err)
     
    decoder, err := control.NewDecoder(resp.Body, nil)
    if err != nil  
        panic(err)
     
    for  
        dmua := DMUA 
        if err := decoder.Decode(&dmua); err != nil  
            if err == io.EOF  
                break
             
            panic(err)
         
        fmt.Printf("The DM %s is allowed to upload:\n", dmua.Uid)
        for _, allowedPackage := range dmua.AllowedPackages  
            fmt.Printf("   %s [granted by %s]\n", allowedPackage.Package, allowedPackage.Fingerprint)
         
     
 
Output (truncated!) looks a bit like:
...
The DM Allison Randal <allison@lohutok.net> is allowed to upload:
   parrot [granted by A4F455C3414B10563FCC9244AFA51BD6CDE573CB]
...
The DM Benjamin Barenblat <bbaren@mit.edu> is allowed to upload:
   boogie [granted by 3224C4469D7DF8F3D6F41A02BBC756DDBE595F6B]
   dafny [granted by 3224C4469D7DF8F3D6F41A02BBC756DDBE595F6B]
   transmission-remote-gtk [granted by 3224C4469D7DF8F3D6F41A02BBC756DDBE595F6B]
   urweb [granted by 3224C4469D7DF8F3D6F41A02BBC756DDBE595F6B]
...
The DM     <aelmahmoudy@sabily.org> is allowed to upload:
   covered [granted by 41352A3B4726ACC590940097F0A98A4C4CD6E3D2]
   dico [granted by 6ADD5093AC6D1072C9129000B1CCD97290267086]
   drawtiming [granted by 41352A3B4726ACC590940097F0A98A4C4CD6E3D2]
   fonts-hosny-amiri [granted by BD838A2BAAF9E3408BD9646833BE1A0A8C2ED8FF]
   ...
...
deb Next up, we've got the deb module. This contains code to handle reading Debian 2.0 .deb files. It contains a wrapper that will parse the control member, and provide the data member through the archive/tar interface. Here's an example of how to read a .deb file, access some metadata, and iterate over the tar archive, and print the filenames of each of the entries.
func main()  
    path := "/tmp/fluxbox_1.3.5-2+b1_amd64.deb"
    fd, err := os.Open(path)
    if err != nil  
        panic(err)
     
    defer fd.Close()
    debFile, err := deb.Load(fd, path)
    if err != nil  
        panic(err)
     
    version := debFile.Control.Version
    fmt.Printf(
        "Epoch: %d, Version: %s, Revision: %s\n",
        version.Epoch, version.Version, version.Revision,
    )
    for  
        hdr, err := debFile.Data.Next()
        if err == io.EOF  
            break
         
        if err != nil  
            panic(err)
         
        fmt.Printf("  -> %s\n", hdr.Name)
     
 
Boringly, the output looks like:
Epoch: 0, Version: 1.3.5, Revision: 2+b1
  -> ./
  -> ./etc/
  -> ./etc/menu-methods/
  -> ./etc/menu-methods/fluxbox
  -> ./etc/X11/
  -> ./etc/X11/fluxbox/
  -> ./etc/X11/fluxbox/window.menu
  -> ./etc/X11/fluxbox/fluxbox.menu-user
  -> ./etc/X11/fluxbox/keys
  -> ./etc/X11/fluxbox/init
  -> ./etc/X11/fluxbox/system.fluxbox-menu
  -> ./etc/X11/fluxbox/overlay
  -> ./etc/X11/fluxbox/apps
  -> ./usr/
  -> ./usr/share/
  -> ./usr/share/man/
  -> ./usr/share/man/man5/
  -> ./usr/share/man/man5/fluxbox-style.5.gz
  -> ./usr/share/man/man5/fluxbox-menu.5.gz
  -> ./usr/share/man/man5/fluxbox-apps.5.gz
  -> ./usr/share/man/man5/fluxbox-keys.5.gz
  -> ./usr/share/man/man1/
  -> ./usr/share/man/man1/startfluxbox.1.gz
...
dependency The dependency package provides an interface to parse and compute dependencies. This package is a bit odd in that, well, there's no other library that does this. The issue is that there are actually two different parsers that compute our Dependency lines, one in Perl (as part of dpkg-dev) and another in C (in dpkg). To date, this has resulted in me filing three different bugs. I also found a broken package in the archive, which actually resulted in another bug being (totally accidentally) already fixed. I hope to continue to run the archive through my parser in hopes of finding more bugs! This package is a bit complex, but it basically just returns what amounts to be an AST for our Dependency lines. I'm positive there are bugs, so file them!
func main()  
    dep, err := dependency.Parse("foo   bar, baz, foobar [amd64]   bazfoo [!sparc], fnord:armhf [gnu-linux-sparc]")
    if err != nil  
        panic(err)
     
    anySparc, err := dependency.ParseArch("sparc")
    if err != nil  
        panic(err)
     
    for _, possi := range dep.GetPossibilities(*anySparc)  
        fmt.Printf("%s (%s)\n", possi.Name, possi.Arch)
     
 
Gives the output:
foo (<nil>)
baz (<nil>)
fnord (armhf)
version Right off the bat, I'd like to thank Michael Stapelberg for letting me graft this out of dcs and into the go-debian package. This was nearly entirely his work (with a one or two line function I added later), and was amazingly helpful to have. Thank you! This module implements Debian version comparisons and parsing, allowing for sorting in lists, checking to see if it's native or not, and letting the programmer to implement smart(er!) logic based on upstream (or Debian) version numbers. This module is extremely easy to use and very straightforward, and not worth writing an example for. Final thoughts This is more of a "Yeah, OK, this has been useful enough to me at this point that I'm going to support this" rather than a "It's stable!" or even "It's alive!" post. Hopefully folks can report bugs and help iterate on this module until we have some really clean building blocks to build solid higher level systems on top of. Being able to have multiple libraries interoperate by relying on go-debian will be a massive ease. I'm in need of more documentation, and to finalize some parts of the older sub package APIs, but I'm hoping to be at a "1.0" real soon now.

24 May 2016

Michal &#268;iha&#345;: Gammu release day

There has been some silence on the Gammu release front and it's time to change that. Today all Gammu, python-gammu and Wammu have been released. As you might guess all are bugfix releases. List of changes for Gammu 1.37.3: List of changes for python-gammu 2.6: List of changes for Wammu 0.41: All updates are also on their way to Debian sid and Gammu PPA. Would you like to see more features in Gammu family? You an support further Gammu development at Bountysource salt or by direct donation.

Filed under: Debian English Gammu python-gammu Wammu 0 comments

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