Search Results: "aron"

31 October 2017

Dirk Eddelbuettel: linl 0.0.2: Couple improvements

Following up on the initial 0.0.1 release of linl, Aaron and I are happy to announce release 0.0.2 which reached the CRAN network on Sunday in a smooth 'CRAN-pretest-publish' auto-admittance. linl provides a simple-yet-powerful Markdown---and RMarkdown---wrapper around the venerable LaTeX letter class; see below for an expanded example also included as the package vignette. This versions sets a few sensible default values for font, font size, margins, signature (non-)indentation and more; it also expands the documentation.
The NEWS entry follows:

Changes in tint version 0.0.2 (2017-10-29)
  • Set a few defaults for a decent-looking skeleton and template: font, fontsize, margins, left-justify closing (#3)
  • Blockquote display is now a default as well (#4).
  • Updated skeleton.Rmd and vignette source accordingly
  • Documented new default options (#5 and #6).
  • Links are now by default printed as footnotes (#9).

Courtesy of CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. More information is on the tint page. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

24 October 2017

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #130

Here's what happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday October 15 and Saturday October 21 2017: Past events Upcoming events New York University sessions A three week session will be held at New York University to work on reproducibilty issues in conjunction with the reproducible builds community. Students from the Application Security course will be working for two weeks to work on the reproducible builds effort. Packages reviewed and fixed, and bugs filed The following reproducible builds-related NMUs were accepted: Patches sent upstream: Reviews of unreproducible packages 41 package reviews have been added, 119 have been updated and 54 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. 2 issue types were removed as they were fixed: Weekly QA work During our reproducibility testing, FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by: diffoscope development strip-nondeterminism development Version 0.039-1 was uploaded to unstable by Chris Lamb. It included contributions already covered by posts of the previous weeks, including: reprotest development tests.reproducible-builds.org Website updates Misc. This week's edition was written by Bernhard M. Wiedemann, Chris Lamb, Holger Levsen, Santiago Torres & reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC & the mailing lists.

22 October 2017

Dirk Eddelbuettel: linl 0.0.1: linl is not Letter

Aaron Wolen and I are pleased to announce the availability of the initial 0.0.1 release of our new linl package on the CRAN network. It provides a simple-yet-powerful Markdown---and RMarkdown---wrapper the venerable LaTeX letter class. Aaron had done the legwork in the underlying pandoc-letter repository upon which we build via proper rmarkdown integration. The package also includes a LaTeX trick or two: optional header and signature files, nicer font, better size, saner default geometry and more. See the following screenshot which shows the package vignette---itself a simple letter---along with (most of) its source:
The initial (short) NEWS entry follows:

Changes in tint version 0.0.1 (2017-10-17)
  • Initial CRAN release

The date is a little off; it took a little longer than usual for the good folks at CRAN to process the initial submission. We expect future releases to be more timely. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

01 October 2017

Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities September 2017

Changes

Issues

Review

Administration
  • icns: merged patches
  • Debian: help guest user with access, investigate/escalate broken network, restart broken stunnels, investigate static.d.o storage, investigate weird RAID mails, ask hoster to investigate power issue,
  • Debian mentors: lintian/security updates & reboot
  • Debian wiki: merged & deployed patch, redirect DDTSS translator, redirect user support requests, whitelist email addresses, update email for accounts with bouncing email,
  • Debian derivatives census: merged/deployed patches
  • Debian PTS: debugged cron mails, deployed changes, reran scripts, fixed configuration file
  • Openmoko: debug reboot issue, debug load issues

Communication

Sponsors The samba bug was sponsored by my employer. All other work was done on a volunteer basis.

06 September 2017

Mike Gabriel: MATE 1.18 landed in Debian testing

This is to announce that finally all MATE Desktop 1.18 components have landed in Debian testing (aka buster). Credits Again a big thanks to the packaging team (esp. Vangelis Mouhtsis and Martin Wimpress, but also to Jeremy Bicha for constant advice and Aron Xu for joining the Debian+Ubuntu MATE Packaging Team and merging all the Ubuntu zesty and artful branches back to master). Fully Available on all Debian-supported Architectures The very special thing about this MATE 1.18 release for Debian is that MATE is now available on all Debian hardware architectures. See "Buildd" column on our DDPO overview page [1]. Thanks to all the people from the Debian porters realm for providing feedback to my porting questions. References

03 September 2017

Lior Kaplan: FOSScamp Syros 2017 day 1

During Debconf17 I was asked by Daniel Pocock if I can attend FOSScamp Syros to help with Debian s l10n in the Balkans. I said I would be happy to, although my visit would be short (2.5 days) due to previous plans. The main idea of camp is to have FOSS people meet for about 1 week near a beach. So it s sun, water and free software. This year it takes place in Syros, Greece. After take the morning ferry, I met with the guys at noon. I didn t know how would it be, as it s my first time with this group/meeting, but they were very nice and welcoming. 10 minutes after my arrival I found myself setting with two of the female attendees starting to work on Albanian (sq) translation of Debian Installer. It took my a few minutes to find my where to check out the current level1 files, as I thought they aren t in SVN anymore, but ended up learning the PO files is the only part of the installer still on SVN. As the girls were quick with the assinged levle1 sublevels, I started to look for the level2 and level3 files, and it was annoying to have the POT files very accessible, but no links to the relevant git repositories. I do want to have all the relevant links in one central place, so people who want to help with translation could do that. While some of the team member just used a text editor to edit the files, I suggested to them using either poedit or granslator, both I used a few years ago. Yaron Shahrabani also recommended virtaal to me, but after trying it for a while I didn t like it (expect it s great feature showing the diff with fuzzy messages). For the few people who also have Windows on their machine, both poedit and Virtaal have windows binaries for download. So you don t have to have Linux in order to help with translations. In parallel, I used the free time to work on the Hebrew translation for level1, as it s been a while since either me or Omer Zak worked on it. Quite soon the guys started to send me the files for review, and I did find some errors using diff. Especially when not everyone use a PO editor. I also missed a few strings during the review, which got fixed later on by Christian Perrier. Team work indeed (: I found it interesting to see the reactions and problems for the team to work with the PO files, and most projects now use some system (e.g. Pootle) for online web translation. Which saves some of the head ace, but also prevents from making some review and quality check before submitting the files. It s a good idea to explore this option for Debian as well. A tip for those who do want to work with PO files, either use git s diff features or use colordiff to check your changes (notice less will require -R parameter to keep the color). Although I met the guys only at noon, the day was very fruitful for Debian Installer l10n: Some files are still work in progress and will be completed tomorrow. My goal is to have Albanian at 100% during the camp and ready for the next d-i alpha. I must admit that I remember d-i to have many more strings as part of the 3 levels, especially levels 2+3 which were huge (e.g. the iso codes). Except all the work and FOSS related conversations, I found a great group who welcomed me quickly, made me feel comfortable and taught me a thing or two about Greece and the Syros specifically. TIP: try the dark chocolate with red hot chili pepper in the icecream shop.
Filed under: Debian GNU/Linux, i18n & l10n

01 August 2017

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #118

Here's what happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday July 23 and Saturday July 29 2017: Toolchain development and fixes Packages reviewed and fixed, and bugs filed Reviews of unreproducible packages 4 package reviews have been added, 2 have been updated and 24 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. Weekly QA work During our reproducibility testing, FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by: diffoscope development Misc. This week's edition was written by Chris Lamb, Mattia Rizzolo & reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC & the mailing lists.

11 June 2017

Benjamin Mako Hill: The Wikipedia Adventure

I recently finished a paper that presents a novel social computing system called the Wikipedia Adventure. The system was a gamified tutorial for new Wikipedia editors. Working with the tutorial creators, we conducted both a survey of its users and a randomized field experiment testing its effectiveness in encouraging subsequent contributions. We found that although users loved it, it did not affect subsequent participation rates.
Start screen for the Wikipedia Adventure.
A major concern that many online communities face is how to attract and retain new contributors. Despite it s success, Wikipedia is no different. In fact, researchers have shown that after experiencing a massive initial surge in activity, the number of active editors on Wikipedia has been in slow decline since 2007.
The number of active, registered editors ( 5 edits per month) to Wikipedia over time. From Halfaker, Geiger, and Morgan 2012.
Research has attributed a large part of this decline to the hostile environment that newcomers experience when begin contributing. New editors often attempt to make contributions which are subsequently reverted by more experienced editors for not following Wikipedia s increasingly long list of rules and guidelines for effective participation. This problem has led many researchers and Wikipedians to wonder how to more effectively onboard newcomers to the community. How do you ensure that new editors Wikipedia quickly gain the knowledge they need in order to make contributions that are in line with community norms? To this end, Jake Orlowitz and Jonathan Morgan from the Wikimedia Foundation worked with a team of Wikipedians to create a structured, interactive tutorial called The Wikipedia Adventure. The idea behind this system was that new editors would be invited to use it shortly after creating a new account on Wikipedia, and it would provide a step-by-step overview of the basics of editing.

The Wikipedia Adventure was designed to address issues that new editors frequently encountered while learning how to contribute to Wikipedia. It is structured into different missions that guide users through various aspects of participation on Wikipedia, including how to communicate with other editors, how to cite sources, and how to ensure that edits present a neutral point of view. The sequence of the missions gives newbies an overview of what they need to know instead of having to figure everything out themselves. Additionally, the theme and tone of the tutorial sought to engage new users, rather than just redirecting them to the troves of policy pages. Those who play the tutorial receive automated badges on their user page for every mission they complete. This signals to veteran editors that the user is acting in good-faith by attempting to learn the norms of Wikipedia.

An example of a badge that a user receives after demonstrating the skills to communicate with other users on Wikipedia.
Once the system was built, we were interested in knowing whether people enjoyed using it and found it helpful. So we conducted a survey asking editors who played the Wikipedia Adventure a number of questions about its design and educational effectiveness. Overall, we found that users had a very favorable opinion of the system and found it useful.
Survey responses about how users felt about TWA.
Survey responses about what users learned through TWA.
We were heartened by these results. We d sought to build an orientation system that was engaging and educational, and our survey responses suggested that we succeeded on that front. This led us to ask the question could an intervention like the Wikipedia Adventure help reverse the trend of a declining editor base on Wikipedia? In particular, would exposing new editors to the Wikipedia Adventure lead them to make more contributions to the community? To find out, we conducted a field experiment on a population of new editors on Wikipedia. We identified 1,967 newly created accounts that passed a basic test of making good-faith edits. We then randomly invited 1,751 of these users via their talk page to play the Wikipedia Adventure. The rest were sent no invitation. Out of those who were invited, 386 completed at least some portion of the tutorial. We were interested in knowing whether those we invited to play the tutorial (our treatment group) and those we didn t (our control group) contributed differently in the first six months after they created accounts on Wikipedia. Specifically, we wanted to know whether there was a difference in the total number of edits they made to Wikipedia, the number of edits they made to talk pages, and the average quality of their edits as measured by content persistence. We conducted two kinds of analyses on our dataset. First, we estimated the effect of inviting users to play the Wikipedia Adventure on our three outcomes of interest. Second, we estimated the effect of playing the Wikipedia Adventure, conditional on having been invited to do so, on those same outcomes. To our surprise, we found that in both cases there were no significant effects on any of the outcomes of interest. Being invited to play the Wikipedia Adventure therefore had no effect on new users volume of participation either on Wikipedia in general, or on talk pages specifically, nor did it have any effect on the average quality of edits made by the users in our study. Despite the very positive feedback that the system received in the survey evaluation stage, it did not produce a significant change in newcomer contribution behavior. We concluded that the system by itself could not reverse the trend of newcomer attrition on Wikipedia. Why would a system that was received so positively ultimately produce no aggregate effect on newcomer participation? We ve identified a few possible reasons. One is that perhaps a tutorial by itself would not be sufficient to counter hostile behavior that newcomers might experience from experienced editors. Indeed, the friendly, welcoming tone of the Wikipedia Adventure might contrast with strongly worded messages that new editors receive from veteran editors or bots. Another explanation might be that users enjoyed playing the Wikipedia Adventure, but did not enjoy editing Wikipedia. After all, the two activities draw on different kinds of motivations. Finally, the system required new users to choose to play the tutorial. Maybe people who chose to play would have gone on to edit in similar ways without the tutorial. Ultimately, this work shows us the importance of testing systems outside of lab studies. The Wikipedia Adventure was built by community members to address known gaps in the onboarding process, and our survey showed that users responded well to its design. While it would have been easy to declare victory at that stage, the field deployment study painted a different picture. Systems like the Wikipedia Adventure may inform the design of future orientation systems. That said, more profound changes to the interface or modes of interaction between editors might also be needed to increase contributions from newcomers.

This blog post, and the open access paper that it describes, is a collaborative project with Sneha Narayan, Jake Orlowitz, Jonathan Morgan, and Aaron Shaw. Financial support came from the US National Science Foundation (grants IIS-1617129 and IIS-1617468), Northwestern University, and the University of Washington. We also published all the data and code necessary to reproduce our analysis in a repository in the Harvard Dataverse. Sneha posted the material in this blog post over on the Community Data Science Collective Blog.

14 May 2017

Bits from Debian: New Debian Developers and Maintainers (March and April 2017)

The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months: The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months: Congratulations!

03 May 2017

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 105 in Stretch cycle

Here's what happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday April 23 and Saturday April 29 2017: Past and upcoming events On April 26th Chris Lamb gave a talk at foss-north 2017 in Gothenburg, Sweden on Reproducible Builds. Between May 5th-7th the Reproducible Builds Hackathon 2017 will take place in Hamburg, Germany. Then on May 26th Bernhard M. Wiedemann will give a talk titled reproducible builds in openSUSE (2017) at the openSUSE Conference 2017 in N rnberg, Germany. Media coverage Already on April 19th Sylvain Beucler wrote a yet another follow-up post Practical basics of reproducible builds 3, after part 1 and part 2 of his series. Toolchain development and fixes Michael Woerister of the Rust project has implemented file maps that affect all path-related compiler information, including "error messages, metadata, debuginfo, and the file!() macro alike". Ximin Luo with support from some other Rust developers and contributors helped steer the final result into something that was compatible with reproducible builds. Many thanks to all involved, especially for the patience of discussing this over several months. Ximin wrote a first-attempt patch to fix R build-path issues. It made 460/477 R packages reproducible, but also caused 3 of these to FTBFS. See randomness_in_r_rdb_rds_databases for details. Bugs filed and patches sent upstream Chris Lamb: Bernhard M. Wiedemann filed a number of patches upstream: Reviews of unreproducible packages 102 package reviews have been added, 64 have been updated and 24 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. 3 issue types have been updated: Weekly QA work During our reproducibility testing, FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by: diffoscope development diffoscope 82 was uploaded to experimental by Chris Lamb. It included contributions from: Changes from previous weeks that were also released with 82: Misc. This week's edition was written by Ximin Luo, Chris Lamb and Holger Levsen & reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC & the mailing lists.

30 April 2017

Chris Lamb: Free software activities in April 2017

Here is my monthly update covering what I have been doing in the free software world (previous month):
Reproducible builds

Whilst anyone can inspect the source code of free software for malicious flaws, most software is distributed pre-compiled to end users. The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to permit verification that no flaws have been introduced either maliciously or accidentally during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised. I have generously been awarded a grant from the Core Infrastructure Initiative to fund my work in this area. This month I:
I also made the following changes to diffoscope, our recursive and content-aware diff utility used to locate and diagnose reproducibility issues:
  • New features:
    • Add support for comparing Ogg Vorbis files. (0436f9b)
  • Bug fixes:
    • Prevent a traceback when using --new-file with containers. (#861286)
    • Don't crash on invalid archives; print a useful error instead. (#833697).
    • Don't print error output from bzip2 call. (21180c4)
  • Cleanups:
    • Prevent abstraction-level violations by defining visual diff support on Presenter classes. (7b68309)
    • Show Debian packages installed in test output. (c86a9e1)


Debian
Debian LTS

This month I have been paid to work 18 hours on Debian Long Term Support (LTS). In that time I did the following:
  • "Frontdesk" duties, triaging CVEs, etc.
  • Issued DLA 882-1 for the tryton-server general application platform to fix a path suffix injection attack.
  • Issued DLA 883-1 for curl preventing a buffer read overrun vulnerability.
  • Issued DLA 884-1 for collectd (a statistics collection daemon) to close a potential infinite loop vulnerability.
  • Issued DLA 885-1 for the python-django web development framework patching two open redirect & XSS attack issues.
  • Issued DLA 890-1 for ming, a library to create Flash files, closing multiple heap-based buffer overflows.
  • Issued DLA 892-1 and DLA 891-1 for the libnl3/libnl Netlink protocol libraries, fixing integer overflow issues which could have allowed arbitrary code execution.

Uploads
  • redis (4:4.0-rc3-1) New upstream RC release.
  • adminer:
    • 4.3.0-2 Fix debian/watch file.
    • 4.3.1-1 New upstream release.
  • bfs:
    • 1.0-1 Initial release.
    • 1.0-2 Drop fstype tests as they rely on /etc/mtab being available. (#861471)
  • python-django:
    • 1:1.10.7-1 New upstream security release.
    • 1:1.11-1 New upstream stable release to experimental.

I sponsored the following uploads: I also performed the following QA uploads:
  • gtkglext (1.2.0-7) Correct installation location of gdkglext-config.h after "Multi-Archification" in 1.2.0-5. (#860007)
Finally, I made the following non-maintainer uploads (NMUs):
  • python-formencode (1.3.0-2) Don't ship files in /usr/lib/python 2.7,3 /dist-packages/docs. (#860146)
  • django-assets (0.12-2) Patch pytest plugin to check whether we are running in a Django context, otherwise we can break unrelated testsuites. (#859916)


FTP Team

As a Debian FTP assistant I ACCEPTed 155 packages: aiohttp-cors, bear, colorize, erlang-p1-xmpp, fenrir, firejail, fizmo-console, flask-ldapconn, flask-socketio, fontmanager.app, fonts-blankenburg, fortune-zh, fw4spl, fzy, gajim-antispam, gdal, getdns, gfal2, gmime, golang-github-go-macaron-captcha, golang-github-go-macaron-i18n, golang-github-gogits-chardet, golang-github-gopherjs-gopherjs, golang-github-jroimartin-gocui, golang-github-lunny-nodb, golang-github-markbates-goth, golang-github-neowaylabs-wabbit, golang-github-pkg-xattr, golang-github-siddontang-goredis, golang-github-unknwon-cae, golang-github-unknwon-i18n, golang-github-unknwon-paginater, grpc, grr-client-templates, gst-omx, hddemux, highwayhash, icedove, indexed-gzip, jawn, khal, kytos-utils, libbloom, libdrilbo, libhtml-gumbo-perl, libmonospaceif, libpsortb, libundead, llvm-toolchain-4.0, minetest-mod-homedecor, mini-buildd, mrboom, mumps, nnn, node-anymatch, node-asn1.js, node-assert-plus, node-binary-extensions, node-bn.js, node-boom, node-brfs, node-browser-resolve, node-browserify-des, node-browserify-zlib, node-cipher-base, node-console-browserify, node-constants-browserify, node-delegates, node-diffie-hellman, node-errno, node-falafel, node-hash-base, node-hash-test-vectors, node-hash.js, node-hmac-drbg, node-https-browserify, node-jsbn, node-json-loader, node-json-schema, node-loader-runner, node-miller-rabin, node-minimalistic-crypto-utils, node-p-limit, node-prr, node-sha.js, node-sntp, node-static-module, node-tapable, node-tough-cookie, node-tunein, node-umd, open-infrastructure-storage-tools, opensvc, openvas, pgaudit, php-cassandra, protracker, pygame, pypng, python-ase, python-bip32utils, python-ltfatpy, python-pyqrcode, python-rpaths, python-statistics, python-xarray, qtcharts-opensource-src, r-cran-cellranger, r-cran-lexrankr, r-cran-pwt9, r-cran-rematch, r-cran-shinyjs, r-cran-snowballc, ruby-ddplugin, ruby-google-protobuf, ruby-rack-proxy, ruby-rails-assets-underscore, rustc, sbt, sbt-launcher-interface, sbt-serialization, sbt-template-resolver, scopt, seqsero, shim-signed, sniproxy, sortedcollections, starjava-array, starjava-connect, starjava-datanode, starjava-fits, starjava-registry, starjava-table, starjava-task, starjava-topcat, starjava-ttools, starjava-util, starjava-vo, starjava-votable, switcheroo-control, systemd, tilix, tslib, tt-rss-notifier-chrome, u-boot, unittest++, vc, vim-ledger, vis, wesnoth-1.13, wolfssl, wuzz, xandikos, xtensor-python & xwallpaper. I additionally filed 14 RC bugs against packages that had incomplete debian/copyright files against getdns, gfal2, grpc, mrboom, mumps, opensvc, python-ase, sniproxy, starjava-topcat, starjava-ttools, unittest++, wolfssl, xandikos & xtensor-python.

29 April 2017

Shirish Agarwal: India and the Agricultural Economy

Indian farmer ploughing a field in traditional style - Wikimedia commons I was in two minds when I read Ritesh s blog post about the Indian Economy. I was angry with Ritesh as he seemed to selectively take facts and present it rather than taking it whole. Even if he had searched even a little bit, he would have got much more better material and everybody would have been the gainer. I have to also admit, I feel very much like a hypocrite as I have never slaved in a farm so my understanding and conclusions are a mix of media and limited interaction with farmers some years ago. There is also lots of local customs and politics that come into the picture and it s not as straight-forward as Ritesh thinks. What he has failed to share/account for is the far worse bad and stressed debts for the industry so just saying farm loan waivers are bad without sharing any of the context makes it seem much more worse. This is when our Current Chief Economic Adviser states about loan waivers to corporates You need to be able to forgive those debts because this is how capitalism works. People make mistakes, those have to be forgiven to some extent Let me start though with words from a book I read sometime back On a peasant uprising erupted in . The farmers were angry with high interest rates, high taxes, high inflation and low-government prices for their crops. The system had let them into debt, and debt had meant foreclosure and loss of their fields to the land barons. I intentionally have made a fill in the blanks as both the dates and places was true in India 100 years back and even today, the only difference between the two is the absence of taxes. Many people would think I m talking about Champaran whose tale while well-known in India is sadly a stub-class article in wikipedia  with quite a few citation needed tags as well  but is also true today as will be seen below. Interestingly, there is/was a remark by some unknown person who said gora sahab gays, bhura sahab aaya meaning the white officer has gone, in his place the brown officer has come. The evidence of this is very much in the Telegraph Act and the story about its usage and its place in Indian politics Surprisingly, sadly and coincidentally, the quote minus the dates and place didn t happen in India but also in Cambodia. The above quote has been taken from for the sake of all living things by John M. Del Vecchio. The quote itself appears in the first 10 odd pages (historical summation) of the somewhat 1200 odd pages book. I actually got an old edition which tops out at 900 pages so probably some more updated input/news isn t available but it still packs a powerful wallop. I want to dedicate a separate blog post for the book itself so will not say more on that book and what it shares. Sadly and coincidentally, there were news reports yesterday itself of farmers agitating for better prices just yesterday. Some of the interesting work if you want to understand the farmer s indebtedness is to study the Income, Expenditure, Productive Assets and Indebtedness of Agricultural Households in India done by NSSO. Again, one does not need to read the whole report, there were some of the analysis shared by the Hindu here and here. This was also echoed by Logical Indian It really boggles the mind to know than an average farming household earns around INR 200 per day. Even if you take a family of four people that comes to INR 50/- per person. Most rural joint families at the very least have 3-4 kids at the very least. Sadly Agricultural incomes do not keep sync even with the inflation index as there is no fair minimum age and wage for the Indian farmer, the concept does not exist for her(im)  . Just me and mum going onto a restaurant and having one dish each easily can run anywhere between INR 200~250 easily . Cooking in the house is the same if you add/input the labor (which is usually not calculated) used to make lunch/dinner. There was the idea that contract farming might be a solution but even that was corrupted by Multi-national companies such as Pepsi and others that the Government is showing movement to have a model contracting law . There are loads of stories on downtoearth magazine which deals with the above and all sorts of issues the farmer faces. I should talk about Maharashtra and even here there was/has been an irrigation scam with figures given from 35k to 70k crores or 350 to 700 billion INR . The latest finding by the PAC has been shared here. I will cut the blog post short as I find the whole thing personally very depressing. As far as local customs go this was from one of the farmers interaction some years ago where me and some other friends had gone across a village and came to know that all of them grew the same crop with some minor variances. When asked why is it so, while many said its fate, one of the elderly gentleman shared an experience where a farmer had planted some other thing. The gentleman prospered while the other villagers were suffering from glut of whatever they produced. Knowing he prospered, the other villagers damaged his crops and all sorts of unlucky things started happening for the farmer. In the end he realized his best bet is to follow the ways of the other villagers, at least they would be in peace. What I have shared isn t either unique or even unknown, even Toronto Star of Canada reported on the issue some years ago. At the end of it all, the story is one of no education and limited skill-set and I don t see it changing any time soon. There are some who are earning big figures, but majority of the farmers will always be in the red
Filed under: Miscellenous Tagged: #Agricultal Economy, #Champaran, #Contract farming, #Corruption, #farmer suicide, #irrigation scam, #Loan waivers, #planet-debian, poverty

11 April 2017

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 102 in Stretch cycle

Here's what happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday April 2 and Saturday April 8 2017: Media coverage Toolchain development and fixes Reviews of unreproducible packages 27 package reviews have been added, 14 have been updated and 17 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. Weekly QA work During our reproducibility testing, FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by: tests.reproducible-builds.org Misc. This week's edition was written by Chris Lamb, Vagrant Cascadian & reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC & the mailing lists.

31 March 2017

Chris Lamb: Free software activities in March 2017

Here is my monthly update covering what I have been doing in the free software world (previous month):
Reproducible builds

Whilst anyone can inspect the source code of free software for malicious flaws, most software is distributed pre-compiled to end users. The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to permit verification that no flaws have been introduced either maliciously or accidentally during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised. I have generously been awarded a grant from the Core Infrastructure Initiative to fund my work in this area. This month I:
I also made the following changes to our tooling:
diffoscope

diffoscope is our in-depth and content-aware diff utility that can locate and diagnose reproducibility issues.

  • New features/optimisations:
    • Extract squashfs archive in one go rather than per-file, speeding up ISO comparison by ~10x.
    • Add support for .docx and .odt files via docx2txt & odt2txt. (#859056).
    • Add support for PGP files via pgpdump. (#859034).
    • Add support for comparing Pcap files. (#858867).
    • Compare GIF images using gifbuild. (#857610).
  • Bug fixes:
    • Ensure that we really are using ImageMagick and not the GraphicsMagick compatibility layer. (#857940).
    • Fix and add test for meaningless 1234-content metadata when introspecting archives. (#858223).
    • Fix detection of ISO9660 images processed with isohybrid.
    • Skip icc tests if the Debian-specific patch is not present. (#856447).
    • Support newer versions of cbfstool to avoid test failures. (#856446).
    • Update the progress bar prior to working to ensure filename is in sync.
  • Cleanups:
    • Use /usr/share/dpkg/pkg-info.mk over manual calls to dpkg-parsechangelog in debian/rules.
    • Ensure tests and the runtime environment can locate binaries in /usr/sbin (eg. tcpdump).

strip-nondeterminism

strip-nondeterminism is our tool to remove specific non-deterministic results from a completed build.

  • Fix a possible endless loop while stripping .ar files due to trusting the file's own file size data. (#857975).
  • Add support for testing files we should reject and include the filename when evaluating fixtures.

buildinfo.debian.net

buildinfo.debian.net is my experiment into how to process, store and distribute .buildinfo files after the Debian archive software has processed them.

  • Add support for Format: 1.0. (#20).
  • Don't parse Format: header as the source package version. (#21).
  • Show the reproducible status of packages.


Debian


I submitted my platform for the 2017 Debian Project Leader Elections. This was subsequently covered on LWN and I have been participating in the discussions on the debian-vote mailing list since then.


Debian LTS

This month I have been paid to work 14.75 hours on Debian Long Term Support (LTS). In that time I did the following:
  • "Frontdesk" duties, triaging CVEs, etc.
  • Issued DLA 848-1 for the freetype font library fixing a denial of service vulnerability.
  • Issued DLA 851-1 for wget preventing a header injection attack.
  • Issued DLA 863-1 for the deluge BitTorrent client correcting a cross-site request forgery vulnerability.
  • Issued DLA 864-1 for jhead (an EXIF metadata tool) patching an arbitrary code execution vulnerability.
  • Issued DLA 865-1 for the suricata intrusion detection system, fixing an IP protocol matching error.
  • Issued DLA 871-1 for python3.2 fixing a TLS stripping vulnerability in the smptlib library.
  • Issued DLA 873-1 for apt-cacher preventing a HTTP response splitting vulnerability.
  • Issued DLA 876-1 for eject to prevent an issue regarding the checking of setuid(2) and setgid(2) return values.

Uploads
  • python-django:
    • 1:1.10.6-1 New upstream bugfix release.
    • 1:1.11~rc1-1 New upstream release candidate.
  • redis:
    • 3:3.2.8-2 Avoid conflict between RuntimeDirectory and tmpfiles.d(5) both attempting to create /run/redis with differing permissions. (#856116)
    • 3:3.2.8-3 Revert the creation of a /usr/bin/redis-check-rdb to /usr/bin/redis-server symlink to avoid a dangling symlink if only the redis-tools package is installed. (#858519)
  • gunicorn 19.7.0-1 & 19.7.1-1 New upstream releases.
  • adminer 4.3.0-1 New upstream release.

Finally, I also made the following non-maintainer uploads (NMUs):


FTP Team

As a Debian FTP assistant I ACCEPTed 121 packages: 4pane, adql, android-platform-system-core, android-sdk-helper, braillegraph, deepnano, dh-runit, django-auth-ldap, django-dirtyfields, drf-extensions, gammaray, gcc-7, gnome-keysign, golang-code.gitea-sdk, golang-github-bluebreezecf-opentsdb-goclient, golang-github-bsm-redeo, golang-github-cupcake-rdb, golang-github-denisenkom-go-mssqldb, golang-github-exponent-io-jsonpath, golang-github-facebookgo-ensure, golang-github-facebookgo-freeport, golang-github-facebookgo-grace, golang-github-facebookgo-httpdown, golang-github-facebookgo-stack, golang-github-facebookgo-subset, golang-github-go-openapi-loads, golang-github-go-openapi-runtime, golang-github-go-openapi-strfmt, golang-github-go-openapi-validate, golang-github-golang-geo, golang-github-gorilla-pat, golang-github-gorilla-securecookie, golang-github-issue9-assert, golang-github-issue9-identicon, golang-github-jaytaylor-html2text, golang-github-joho-godotenv, golang-github-juju-errors, golang-github-kisielk-gotool, golang-github-kubernetes-gengo, golang-github-lpabon-godbc, golang-github-lunny-log, golang-github-makenowjust-heredoc, golang-github-mrjones-oauth, golang-github-nbutton23-zxcvbn-go, golang-github-neelance-sourcemap, golang-github-ngaut-deadline, golang-github-ngaut-go-zookeeper, golang-github-ngaut-log, golang-github-ngaut-pools, golang-github-ngaut-sync2, golang-github-optiopay-kafka, golang-github-quobyte-api, golang-github-renstrom-dedent, golang-github-sergi-go-diff, golang-github-siddontang-go, golang-github-smartystreets-go-aws-auth, golang-github-xanzy-go-cloudstack, golang-github-xtaci-kcp, golang-github-yohcop-openid-go, graywolf, haskell-raaz, hfst-ospell, hikaricp, iptraf-ng, kanboard-cli, kcptun, kreport, libbluray, libcatmandu-store-elasticsearch-perl, libcsfml, libnet-prometheus-perl, libosmocore, libpandoc-wrapper-perl, libseqlib, matrix-synapse, mockldap, nfs-ganesha, node-buffer, node-pako, nose-el, nvptx-tools, nx-libs, open-ath9k-htc-firmware, pagein, paleomix, pgsql-ogr-fdw, profanity, pyosmium, python-biotools, python-django-extra-views, python-django-otp, python-django-push-notifications, python-dnslib, python-gmpy, python-gmpy2, python-holidays, python-kanboard, python-line-profiler, python-pgpy, python-pweave, python-raven, python-xapian-haystack, python-xopen, r-cran-v8, repetier-host, ruby-jar-dependencies, ruby-maven-libs, ruby-psych, ruby-retriable, seafile-client, spyder-unittest, stressant, systray-mdstat, telegram-desktop, thawab, tigris, tnseq-transit, typesafe-config, vibe.d, x2goserver & xmlrpc-c. I additionally filed 14 RC bugs against packages that had incomplete debian/copyright files against: golang-github-cupcake-rdb, golang-github-sergi-go-diff, graywolf, hfst-ospell, libbluray, pgsql-ogr-fdw, python-gmpy, python-gmpy2, python-pgpy, python-xapian-haystack, repetier-host, telegram-desktop, tigris & xmlrpc-c.

21 March 2017

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 99 in Stretch cycle

Here's what happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday March 12 and Saturday March 18 2017: Upcoming events Reproducible Builds Hackathon Hamburg 2017 The Reproducible Builds Hamburg Hackathon 2017, or RB-HH-2017 for short is a 3 day hacking event taking place May 5th-7th in the CCC Hamburg Hackerspace located inside Frappant, as collective art space located in a historical monument in Hamburg, Germany. The aim of the hackathon is to spent some days working on Reproducible Builds in every distribution and project. The event is open to anybody interested on working on Reproducible Builds issues, with or without prior experience! Accomodation is available and travel sponsorship may be available by agreement. Please register your interest as soon as possible. Reproducible Builds Summit Berlin 2016 This is just a quick note, that all the pads we've written during the Berlin summit in December 2016 are now online (thanks to Holger), nicely complementing the report by Aspiration Tech. Request For Comments for new specification: BUILD_PATH_PREFIX_MAP Ximin Luo posted a draft version of our BUILD_PATH_PREFIX_MAP specification for passing build-time paths between high-level and low-level build tools. This is meant to help eliminate irreproducibility caused by different paths being used at build time. At the time of writing, this affects an estimated 15-20% of 25000 Debian packages. This is a continuation of an older proposal SOURCE_PREFIX_MAP, which has been updated based on feedback on our patches from GCC upstream, attendees of our Berlin 2016 summit, and participants on our mailing list. Thanks to everyone that contributed! The specification also contains runnable source code examples and test cases; see our git repo. Please comment on this draft ASAP - we plan to release version 1.0 of this in a few weeks. Toolchain changes Packages reviewed and fixed, and bugs filed Chris Lamb: Reviews of unreproducible packages 5 package reviews have been added, 274 have been updated and 800 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. 1 issue type has been added: Weekly QA work During our reproducibility testing, FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by: diffoscope development diffoscope 79 and 80 were uploaded to experimental by Chris Lamb. It included contributions from: Chris Lamb: Maria Glukhova: strip-nondeterminism development strip-nondeterminism 0.032-1 was uploaded to unstable by Chris Lamb. It included contributions from: Chris Lamb: tests.reproducible-builds.org Misc. This week's edition was written by Ximin Luo, Holger Levsen and Chris Lamb & reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC & the mailing lists.

12 September 2016

Steve Kemp: If your code accepts URIs as input..

There are many online sites that accept reading input from remote locations. For example a site might try to extract all the text from a webpage, or show you the HTTP-headers a given server sends back in response to a request. If you run such a site you must make sure you validate the schema you're given - also remembering to do that if you're sent any HTTP-redirects.
Really the issue here is a confusion between URL & URI.
The only time I ever communicated with Aaron Swartz was unfortunately after his death, because I didn't make the connection. I randomly stumbled upon the html2text software he put together, which had an online demo containing a form for entering a location. I tried the obvious input:
file:///etc/passwd
The software was vulnerable, read the file, and showed it to me. The site gives errors on all inputs now, so it cannot be used to demonstrate the problem, but on Friday I saw another site on Hacker News with the very same input-issue, and it reminded me that there's a very real class of security problems here. The site in question was http://fuckyeahmarkdown.com/ and allows you to enter a URL to convert to markdown - I found this via the hacker news submission. The following link shows the contents of /etc/hosts, and demonstrates the problem: http://fuckyeahmarkdown.example.com/go/?u=file:///etc/hosts&read=1&preview=1&showframe=0&submit=go The output looked like this:
..
127.0.0.1 localhost
255.255.255.255 broadcasthost
::1 localhost
fe80::1%lo0 localhost
127.0.0.1 stage
127.0.0.1 files
127.0.0.1 brettt..
..
In the actual output of '/etc/passwd' all newlines had been stripped. (Which I now recognize as being an artifact of the markdown processing.) UPDATE: The problem is fixed now.

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 72 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday September 4 and Saturday September 10 2016: Reproducible work in other projects Python 3.6's dictonary type now retains the insertion order. Thanks to themill for the report. In coreboot, Alexander Couzens committed a change to make their release archives reproducible. Patches submitted Reviews of unreproducible packages We've been adding to our knowledge about identified issues. 3 issue types have been added: 1 issue type has been updated: 16 have been have updated: 13 have been removed, not including removed packages: 100s of packages have been tagged with the more generic captures_build_path, and many with captures_kernel_version, user_hostname_manually_added_requiring_further_investigation, user_hostname_manually_added_requiring_further_investigation, captures_shell_variable_in_autofoo_script, etc. Particular thanks to Emanuel Bronshtein for his work here. Weekly QA work FTBFS bugs have been reported by: diffoscope development strip-nondeterminism development tests.reproducible-builds.org: Misc. This week's edition was written by Chris Lamb and Holger Levsen and reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC.

24 April 2016

Bits from Debian: Debian welcomes its 2016 summer interns

GSoC 2016 logo Outreachy logo We're excited to announce that Debian has selected 29 interns to work with us this summer: 4 in Outreachy, and 25 in the Google Summer of Code. Here is the list of projects and the interns who will work on them: Android SDK tools in Debian: APT - dpkg communications rework: Continuous Integration for Debian-Med packages: Extending the Debian Developer Horizon: Improving and extending AppRecommender: Improving the debsources frontend: Improving voice, video and chat communication with Free Software: MIPS and MIPSEL ports improvements: Reproducible Builds for Debian and Free Software: Support for KLEE in Debile: The Google Summer of Code and Outreachy programs are possible in Debian thanks to the effort of Debian developers and contributors that dedicate part of their free time to mentor students and outreach tasks. Join us and help extend Debian! You can follow the students weekly reports on the debian-outreach mailing-list, chat with us on our IRC channel or on each project's team mailing lists. Congratulations to all of them!

10 April 2016

Russ Allbery: Largish haul

Let's see if I can scrounge through all of my now-organized directories of ebooks and figure out what I haven't recorded here yet. At least the paper books make that relatively easy, since I don't shelve them until I post them. (Yeah, yeah, I should actually make a database.) Hugh Aldersey-Williams Periodic Tales (nonfiction)
Sandra Ulbrich Almazan SF Women A-Z (nonfiction)
Radley Balko Rise of the Warrior Cop (nonfiction)
Peter V. Brett The Warded Man (sff)
Lois McMaster Bujold Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen (sff)
Fred Clark The Anti-Christ Handbook Vol. 2 (nonfiction)
Dave Duncan West of January (sff)
Karl Fogel Producing Open Source Software (nonfiction)
Philip Gourevitch We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families (nonfiction)
Andrew Groen Empires of EVE (nonfiction)
John Harris @ Play (nonfiction)
David Hellman & Tevis Thompson Second Quest (graphic novel)
M.C.A. Hogarth Earthrise (sff)
S.L. Huang An Examination of Collegial Dynamics... (sff)
S.L. Huang & Kurt Hunt Up and Coming (sff anthology)
Kameron Hurley Infidel (sff)
Kevin Jackson-Mead & J. Robinson Wheeler IF Theory Reader (nonfiction)
Rosemary Kirstein The Lost Steersman (sff)
Rosemary Kirstein The Language of Power (sff)
Merritt Kopas Videogames for Humans (nonfiction)
Alisa Krasnostein & Alexandra Pierce (ed.) Letters to Tiptree (nonfiction)
Mathew Kumar Exp. Negatives (nonfiction)
Ken Liu The Grace of Kings (sff)
Susan MacGregor The Tattooed Witch (sff)
Helen Marshall Gifts for the One Who Comes After (sff collection)
Jack McDevitt Coming Home (sff)
Seanan McGuire A Red-Rose Chain (sff)
Seanan McGuire Velveteen vs. The Multiverse (sff)
Seanan McGuire The Winter Long (sff)
Marc Miller Agent of the Imperium (sff)
Randal Munroe Thing Explainer (graphic nonfiction)
Marguerite Reed Archangel (sff)
J.K. Rowling Harry Potter: The Complete Collection (sff)
K.J. Russell Tides of Possibility (sff anthology)
Robert J. Sawyer Starplex (sff)
Bruce Schneier Secrets & Lies (nonfiction)
Mike Selinker (ed.) The Kobold Game to Board Game Design (nonfiction)
Douglas Smith Chimerascope (sff collection)
Jonathan Strahan Fearsome Journeys (sff anthology)
Nick Suttner Shadow of the Colossus (nonfiction)
Aaron Swartz The Boy Who Could Change the World (essays)
Caitlin Sweet The Pattern Scars (sff)
John Szczepaniak The Untold History of Japanese Game Developers I (nonfiction)
John Szczepaniak The Untold History of Japanese Game Developers II (nonfiction)
Jeffrey Toobin The Run of His Life (nonfiction)
Hayden Trenholm Blood and Water (sff anthology)
Coen Teulings & Richard Baldwin (ed.) Secular Stagnation (nonfiction)
Ursula Vernon Book of the Wombat 2015 (graphic nonfiction)
Ursula Vernon Digger (graphic novel) Phew, that was a ton of stuff. A bunch of these were from two large StoryBundle bundles, which is a great source of cheap DRM-free ebooks, although still rather hit and miss. There's a lot of just fairly random stuff that's been accumulating for a while, even though I've not had a chance to read very much. Vacation upcoming, which will be a nice time to catch up on reading.

10 March 2016

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 45 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the reproducible builds effort between February 28th and March 5th:

Toolchain fixes
  • Antonio Terceiro uploaded gem2deb/0.27 that forces generated gemspecs to use the date from debian/changelog.
  • Antonio Terceiro uploaded gem2deb/0.28 that forces generated gemspecs to have their contains file lists sorted.
  • Robert Luberda uploaded ispell/3.4.00-5 which make builds of hashes reproducible.
  • C dric Boutillier uploaded ruby-ronn/0.7.3-4 which will make the output locale agnostic. Original patch by Chris Lamb.
  • Markus Koschany uploaded spring/101.0+dfsg-1. Fixed by Alexandre Detiste.
Ximin Luo resubmitted the patch adding the --clamp-mtime option to Tar on Savannah's bug tracker. Lunar rebased our experimental dpkg on top of the current master branch. Changes in the test infrastructure are required before uploading a new version to our experimental repository. Reiner Herrmann rebased our custom texlive-bin against the latest uploaded version.

Packages fixed The following 77 packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: asciidoctor, atig, fuel-astute, jekyll, libphone-ui-shr, linkchecker, maven-plugin-testing, node-iscroll, origami-pdf, plexus-digest, pry, python-avro, python-odf, rails, ruby-actionpack-xml-parser, ruby-active-model-serializers, ruby-activerecord-session-store, ruby-api-pagination, ruby-babosa, ruby-carrierwave, ruby-classifier-reborn, ruby-compass, ruby-concurrent, ruby-configurate, ruby-crack, ruby-css-parser, ruby-cucumber-rails, ruby-delorean, ruby-encryptor, ruby-fakeweb, ruby-flexmock, ruby-fog-vsphere, ruby-gemojione, ruby-git, ruby-grack, ruby-htmlentities, ruby-jekyll-feed, ruby-json-schema, ruby-listen, ruby-markerb, ruby-mathml, ruby-mini-magick, ruby-net-telnet, ruby-omniauth-azure-oauth2, ruby-omniauth-saml, ruby-org, ruby-origin, ruby-prawn, ruby-pygments.rb, ruby-raemon, ruby-rails-deprecated-sanitizer, ruby-raindrops, ruby-rbpdf, ruby-rbvmomi, ruby-recaptcha, ruby-ref, ruby-responders, ruby-rjb, ruby-rspec-rails, ruby-rspec, ruby-rufus-scheduler, ruby-sass-rails, ruby-sass, ruby-sentry-raven, ruby-sequel-pg, ruby-sequel, ruby-settingslogic, ruby-shoulda-matchers, ruby-slack-notifier, ruby-symboltable, ruby-timers, ruby-zip, ticgit, tmuxinator, vagrant, wagon, yard. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet:
  • #816209 on elog by Reiner Herrmann: use printf instead of echo which is shell-independent.
  • #816214 on python-pip by Reiner Herrmann: removes timestamp from generated Python scripts.
  • #816230 on rows by Reiner Herrmann: tell grep to always treat the input as text.
  • #816232 on eficas by Reiner Herrmann: use printf instead of echo which is shell-independent.
Florent Daigniere and bancfc reported that linux-grsec was currently built with GRKERNSEC_RANDSTRUCT which will prevent reproducible builds with the current packaging.

tests.reproducible-builds.org pbuilder has been updated to the last version to be able to support Build-Depends-Arch and Build-Conflicts-Arch. (Mattia Rizzolo, h01ger) New package sets have been added for Subgraph OS, which is based on Debian Stretch: packages and build dependencies. (h01ger) Two new armhf build nodes have been added (thanks Vagrant Cascadian) and integrated in our Jenkins setup with 8 new armhf builder jobs. (h01ger)

strip-nondeterminism development strip-nondeterminism version 0.016-1 was released on Sunday 28th. It will now normalize the POT-Creation-Date field in GNU Gettext .mo files. (Reiner Herrmann) Several improvements to the packages metadata have also been made. (h01ger, Ben Finney)

Package reviews 185 reviews have been removed, 91 added and 33 updated in the previous week. New issue: fileorder_in_gemspec_files_list. 43 FTBFS bugs were reported by Chris Lamb, Martin Michlmayr, and gregor herrmann.

Misc. After merging the patch from Dhiru Kholia adding support for SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH in rpm, Florian Festi opened a discussion on the rpm-ecosystem mailing list about reproducible builds. On March 4th, Lunar gave an overview of the general reproducible builds effort at the Internet Freedom Festival in Valencia.

Next.