Search Results: "Simon McVittie"

5 January 2022

Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in December 2021

Welcome to the December 2021 report from the Reproducible Builds project! In these reports, we try and summarise what we have been up to over the past month, as well as what else has been occurring in the world of software supply-chain security. As a quick recap of what reproducible builds is trying to address, whilst anyone may inspect the source code of free software for malicious flaws, almost all software is distributed to end users as pre-compiled binaries. The motivation behind the reproducible builds effort is to ensure no flaws have been introduced during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised. As always, if you would like to contribute to the project, please get in touch with us directly or visit the Contribute page on our website.
Early in December, Julien Voisin blogged about setting up a rebuilderd instance in order to reproduce Tails images. Working on previous work from 2018, Julien has now set up a public-facing instance which is providing build attestations. As Julien dryly notes in his post, Currently, this isn t really super-useful to anyone, except maybe some Tails developers who want to check that the release manager didn t backdoor the released image. Naturally, we would contend sincerely that this is indeed useful.
The secure/anonymous Tor browser now supports reproducible source releases. According to the project s changelog, version 0.4.7.3-alpha of Tor can now build reproducible tarballs via the make dist-reprod command. This issue was tracked via Tor issue #26299.
Fabian Keil posted a question to our mailing list this month asking how they might analyse differences in images produced with the FreeBSD and ElectroBSD s mkimg and makefs commands:
After rebasing ElectroBSD from FreeBSD stable/11 to stable/12
I recently noticed that the "memstick" images are unfortunately
still not 100% reproducible.
Fabian s original post generated a short back-and-forth with Chris Lamb regarding how diffoscope might be able to support the particular format of images generated by this command set.

diffoscope diffoscope is our in-depth and content-aware diff utility. Not only can it locate and diagnose reproducibility issues, it can provide human-readable diffs from many kinds of binary formats. This month, Chris Lamb prepared and uploading versions 195, 196, 197 and 198 to Debian, as well as made the following changes:
  • Support showing Ordering differences only within .dsc field values. [ ]
  • Add support for XMLb files. [ ]
  • Also add, for example, /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu to our local binary search path. [ ]
  • Support OCaml versions 4.11, 4.12 and 4.13. [ ]
  • Drop some unnecessary has_same_content_as logging calls. [ ]
  • Replace token variable with an anonymously-named variable instead to remove extra lines. [ ]
  • Don t use the runtime platform s native endianness when unpacking .pyc files. This fixes test failures on big-endian machines. [ ]
Mattia Rizzolo also made a number of changes to diffoscope this month as well, such as:
  • Also recognize GnuCash files as XML. [ ]
  • Support the pgpdump PGP packet visualiser version 0.34. [ ]
  • Ignore the new Lintian tag binary-with-bad-dynamic-table. [ ]
  • Fix the Enhances field in debian/control. [ ]
Finally, Brent Spillner fixed the version detection for Black uncompromising code formatter [ ], Jelle van der Waa added an external tool reference for Arch Linux [ ] and Roland Clobus added support for reporting when the GNU_BUILD_ID field has been modified [ ]. Thank you for your contributions!

Distribution work In Debian this month, 70 reviews of packages were added, 27 were updated and 41 were removed, adding to our database of knowledge about specific issues. A number of issue types were created as well, including: strip-nondeterminism version 1.13.0-1 was uploaded to Debian unstable by Holger Levsen. It included contributions already covered in previous months as well as new ones from Mattia Rizzolo, particularly that the dh_strip_nondeterminism Debian integration interface uses the new get_non_binnmu_date_epoch() utility when available: this is important to ensure that strip-nondeterminism does not break some kinds of binNMUs.
In the world of openSUSE, however, Bernhard M. Wiedemann posted his monthly reproducible builds status report.
In NixOS, work towards the longer-term goal of making the graphical installation image reproducible is ongoing. For example, Artturin made the gnome-desktop package reproducible.

Upstream patches The Reproducible Builds project attempts to fix as many currently-unreproducible packages as possible. In December, we wrote a large number of such patches, including:

Testing framework The Reproducible Builds project runs a significant testing framework at tests.reproducible-builds.org, to check packages and other artifacts for reproducibility. This month, the following changes were made:
  • Holger Levsen:
    • Run the Debian scheduler less often. [ ]
    • Fix the name of the Debian testing suite name. [ ]
    • Detect builds that are rescheduling due to problems with the diffoscope container. [ ]
    • No longer special-case particular machines having a different /boot partition size. [ ]
    • Automatically fix failed apt-daily and apt-daily-upgrade services [ ], failed e2scrub_all.service & user@ systemd units [ ][ ] as well as generic build failures [ ].
    • Simplify a script to powercycle arm64 architecture nodes hosted at/by codethink.co.uk. [ ]
    • Detect if the udd-mirror.debian.net service is down. [ ]
    • Various miscellaneous node maintenance. [ ][ ]
  • Roland Clobus (Debian live image generation):
    • If the latest snapshot is not complete yet, try to use the previous snapshot instead. [ ]
    • Minor: whitespace correction + comment correction. [ ]
    • Use unique folders and reports for each Debian version. [ ]
    • Turn off debugging. [ ]
    • Add a better error description for incorrect/missing arguments. [ ]
    • Report non-reproducible issues in Debian sid images. [ ]
Lastly, Mattia Rizzolo updated the automatic logfile parsing rules in a number of ways (eg. to ignore a warning about the Python setuptools deprecation) [ ][ ] and Vagrant Cascadian adjusted the config for the Squid caching proxy on a node. [ ]

If you are interested in contributing to the Reproducible Builds project, please visit our Contribute page on our website. However, you can get in touch with us via:

5 December 2021

Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in November 2021

Welcome to the November 2021 report from the Reproducible Builds project. As a quick recap, whilst anyone may inspect the source code of free software for malicious flaws, almost all software is distributed to end users as pre-compiled binaries. The motivation behind the reproducible builds effort is therefore to ensure no flaws have been introduced during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised. If you are interested in contributing to our project, please visit our Contribute page on our website.
On November 6th, Vagrant Cascadian presented at this year s edition of the SeaGL conference, giving a talk titled Debugging Reproducible Builds One Day at a Time:
I ll explore how I go about identifying issues to work on, learn more about the specific issues, recreate the problem locally, isolate the potential causes, dissect the problem into identifiable parts, and adapt the packaging and/or source code to fix the issues.
A video recording of the talk is available on archive.org.
Fedora Magazine published a post written by Zbigniew J drzejewski-Szmek about how to Use Diffoscope in packager workflows, specifically around ensuring that new versions of a package do not introduce breaking changes:
In the role of a packager, updating packages is a recurring task. For some projects, a packager is involved in upstream maintenance, or well written release notes make it easy to figure out what changed between the releases. This isn t always the case, for instance with some small project maintained by one or two people somewhere on GitHub, and it can be useful to verify what exactly changed. Diffoscope can help determine the changes between package releases. [ ]

kpcyrd announced the release of rebuilderd version 0.16.3 on our mailing list this month, adding support for builds to generate multiple artifacts at once.
Lastly, we held another IRC meeting on November 30th. As mentioned in previous reports, due to the global events throughout 2020 etc. there will be no in-person summit event this year.

diffoscope diffoscope is our in-depth and content-aware diff utility. Not only can it locate and diagnose reproducibility issues, it can provide human-readable diffs from many kinds of binary formats. This month, Chris Lamb made the following changes, including preparing and uploading versions 190, 191, 192, 193 and 194 to Debian:
  • New features:
    • Continue loading a .changes file even if the referenced files do not exist, but include a comment in the returned diff. [ ]
    • Log the reason if we cannot load a Debian .changes file. [ ]
  • Bug fixes:
    • Detect XML files as XML files if file(1) claims if they are XML files or if they are named .xml. (#999438)
    • Don t duplicate file lists at each directory level. (#989192)
    • Don t raise a traceback when comparing nested directories with non-directories. [ ]
    • Re-enable test_android_manifest. [ ]
    • Don t reject Debian .changes files if they contain non-printable characters. [ ]
  • Codebase improvements:
    • Avoid aliasing variables if we aren t going to use them. [ ]
    • Use isinstance over type. [ ]
    • Drop a number of unused imports. [ ]
    • Update a bunch of %-style string interpolations into f-strings or str.format. [ ]
    • When pretty-printing JSON, mark the difference as being reformatted, additionally avoiding including the full path. [ ]
    • Import itertools top-level module directly. [ ]
Chris Lamb also made an update to the command-line client to trydiffoscope, a web-based version of the diffoscope in-depth and content-aware diff utility, specifically only waiting for 2 minutes for try.diffoscope.org to respond in tests. (#998360) In addition Brandon Maier corrected an issue where parts of large diffs were missing from the output [ ], Zbigniew J drzejewski-Szmek fixed some logic in the assert_diff_startswith method [ ] and Mattia Rizzolo updated the packaging metadata to denote that we support both Python 3.9 and 3.10 [ ] as well as a number of warning-related changes[ ][ ]. Vagrant Cascadian also updated the diffoscope package in GNU Guix [ ][ ].

Distribution work In Debian, Roland Clobus updated the wiki page documenting Debian reproducible Live images to mention some new bug reports and also posted an in-depth status update to our mailing list. In addition, 90 reviews of Debian packages were added, 18 were updated and 23 were removed this month adding to our knowledge about identified issues. Chris Lamb identified a new toolchain issue, absolute_path_in_cmake_file_generated_by_meson.
Work has begun on classifying reproducibility issues in packages within the Arch Linux distribution. Similar to the analogous effort within Debian (outlined above), package information is listed in a human-readable packages.yml YAML file and a sibling README.md file shows how to classify packages too. Finally, Bernhard M. Wiedemann posted his monthly reproducible builds status report for openSUSE and Vagrant Cascadian updated a link on our website to link to the GNU Guix reproducibility testing overview [ ].

Software development The Reproducible Builds project detects, dissects and attempts to fix as many currently-unreproducible packages as possible. We endeavour to send all of our patches upstream where appropriate. This month, we wrote a large number of such patches, including: Elsewhere, in software development, Jonas Witschel updated strip-nondeterminism, our tool to remove specific non-deterministic results from a completed build so that it did not fail on JAR archives containing invalid members with a .jar extension [ ]. This change was later uploaded to Debian by Chris Lamb. reprotest is the Reproducible Build s project end-user tool to build the same source code twice in widely different environments and checking whether the binaries produced by the builds have any differences. This month, Mattia Rizzolo overhauled the Debian packaging [ ][ ][ ] and fixed a bug surrounding suffixes in the Debian package version [ ], whilst Stefano Rivera fixed an issue where the package tests were broken after the removal of diffoscope from the package s strict dependencies [ ].

Testing framework The Reproducible Builds project runs a testing framework at tests.reproducible-builds.org, to check packages and other artifacts for reproducibility. This month, the following changes were made:
  • Holger Levsen:
    • Document the progress in setting up snapshot.reproducible-builds.org. [ ]
    • Add the packages required for debian-snapshot. [ ]
    • Make the dstat package available on all Debian based systems. [ ]
    • Mark virt32b-armhf and virt64b-armhf as down. [ ]
  • Jochen Sprickerhof:
    • Add SSH authentication key and enable access to the osuosl168-amd64 node. [ ][ ]
  • Mattia Rizzolo:
    • Revert reproducible Debian: mark virt(32 64)b-armhf as down - restored. [ ]
  • Roland Clobus (Debian live image generation):
    • Rename sid internally to unstable until an issue in the snapshot system is resolved. [ ]
    • Extend testing to include Debian bookworm too.. [ ]
    • Automatically create the Jenkins view to display jobs related to building the Live images. [ ]
  • Vagrant Cascadian:
    • Add a Debian package set group for the packages and tools maintained by the Reproducible Builds maintainers themselves. [ ]


If you are interested in contributing to the Reproducible Builds project, please visit our Contribute page on our website. However, you can get in touch with us via:

6 October 2021

Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in September 2021

The goal behind reproducible builds is to ensure that no deliberate flaws have been introduced during compilation processes via promising or mandating that identical results are always generated from a given source. This allowing multiple third-parties to come to an agreement on whether a build was compromised or not by a system of distributed consensus. In these reports we outline the most important things that have been happening in the world of reproducible builds in the past month:
First mentioned in our March 2021 report, Martin Heinz published two blog posts on sigstore, a project that endeavours to offer software signing as a public good, [the] software-signing equivalent to Let s Encrypt . The two posts, the first entitled Sigstore: A Solution to Software Supply Chain Security outlines more about the project and justifies its existence:
Software signing is not a new problem, so there must be some solution already, right? Yes, but signing software and maintaining keys is very difficult especially for non-security folks and UX of existing tools such as PGP leave much to be desired. That s why we need something like sigstore - an easy to use software/toolset for signing software artifacts.
The second post (titled Signing Software The Easy Way with Sigstore and Cosign) goes into some technical details of getting started.
There was an interesting thread in the /r/Signal subreddit that started from the observation that Signal s apk doesn t match with the source code:
Some time ago I checked Signal s reproducibility and it failed. I asked others to test in case I did something wrong, but nobody made any reports. Since then I tried to test the Google Play Store version of the apk against one I compiled myself, and that doesn t match either.

BitcoinBinary.org was announced this month, which aims to be a repository of Reproducible Build Proofs for Bitcoin Projects :
Most users are not capable of building from source code themselves, but we can at least get them able enough to check signatures and shasums. When reputable people who can tell everyone they were able to reproduce the project s build, others at least have a secondary source of validation.

Distribution work Fr d ric Pierret announced a new testing service at beta.tests.reproducible-builds.org, showing actual rebuilds of binaries distributed by both the Debian and Qubes distributions. In Debian specifically, however, 51 reviews of Debian packages were added, 31 were updated and 31 were removed this month to our database of classified issues. As part of this, Chris Lamb refreshed a number of notes, including the build_path_in_record_file_generated_by_pybuild_flit_plugin issue. Elsewhere in Debian, Roland Clobus posted his Fourth status update about reproducible live-build ISO images in Jenkins to our mailing list, which mentions (amongst other things) that:
  • All major configurations are still built regularly using live-build and bullseye.
  • All major configurations are reproducible now; Jenkins is green.
    • I ve worked around the issue for the Cinnamon image.
    • The patch was accepted and released within a few hours.
  • My main focus for the last month was on the live-build tool itself.
Related to this, there was continuing discussion on how to embed/encode the build metadata for the Debian live images which were being worked on by Roland Clobus.
Ariadne Conill published another detailed blog post related to various security initiatives within the Alpine Linux distribution. After summarising some conventional security work being done (eg. with sudo and the release of OpenSSH version 3.0), Ariadne included another section on reproducible builds: The main blocker [was] determining what to do about storing the build metadata so that a build environment can be recreated precisely . Finally, Bernhard M. Wiedemann posted his monthly reproducible builds status report.

Community news On our website this month, Bernhard M. Wiedemann fixed some broken links [ ] and Holger Levsen made a number of changes to the Who is Involved? page [ ][ ][ ]. On our mailing list, Magnus Ihse Bursie started a thread with the subject Reproducible builds on Java, which begins as follows:
I m working for Oracle in the Build Group for OpenJDK which is primary responsible for creating a built artifact of the OpenJDK source code. [ ] For the last few years, we have worked on a low-effort, background-style project to make the build of OpenJDK itself building reproducible. We ve come far, but there are still issues I d like to address. [ ]

diffoscope diffoscope is our in-depth and content-aware diff utility. Not only can it locate and diagnose reproducibility issues, it can provide human-readable diffs from many kinds of binary formats. This month, Chris Lamb prepared and uploaded versions 183, 184 and 185 as well as performed significant triaging of merge requests and other issues in addition to making the following changes:
  • New features:
    • Support a newer format version of the R language s .rds files. [ ]
    • Update tests for OCaml 4.12. [ ]
    • Add a missing format_class import. [ ]
  • Bug fixes:
    • Don t call close_archive when garbage collecting Archive instances, unless open_archive definitely returned successfully. This prevents, for example, an AttributeError where PGPContainer s cleanup routines were rightfully assuming that its temporary directory had actually been created. [ ]
    • Fix (and test) the comparison of R language s .rdb files after refactoring temporary directory handling. [ ]
    • Ensure that RPM archives exists in the Debian package description, regardless of whether python3-rpm is installed or not at build time. [ ]
  • Codebase improvements:
    • Use our assert_diff routine in tests/comparators/test_rdata.py. [ ]
    • Move diffoscope.versions to diffoscope.tests.utils.versions. [ ]
    • Reformat a number of modules with Black. [ ][ ]
However, the following changes were also made:
  • Mattia Rizzolo:
    • Fix an autopkgtest caused by the androguard module not being in the (expected) python3-androguard Debian package. [ ]
    • Appease a shellcheck warning in debian/tests/control.sh. [ ]
    • Ignore a warning from h5py in our tests that doesn t concern us. [ ]
    • Drop a trailing .1 from the Standards-Version field as it s required. [ ]
  • Zbigniew J drzejewski-Szmek:
    • Stop using the deprecated distutils.spawn.find_executable utility. [ ][ ][ ][ ][ ]
    • Adjust an LLVM-related test for LLVM version 13. [ ]
    • Update invocations of llvm-objdump. [ ]
    • Adjust a test with a one-byte text file for file version 5.40. [ ]
And, finally, Benjamin Peterson added a --diff-context option to control unified diff context size [ ] and Jean-Romain Garnier fixed the Macho comparator for architectures other than x86-64 [ ].

Upstream patches The Reproducible Builds project detects, dissects and attempts to fix as many currently-unreproducible packages as possible. We endeavour to send all of our patches upstream where appropriate. This month, we wrote a large number of such patches, including:

Testing framework The Reproducible Builds project runs a testing framework at tests.reproducible-builds.org, to check packages and other artifacts for reproducibility. This month, the following changes were made:
  • Holger Levsen:
    • Drop my package rebuilder prototype as it s not useful anymore. [ ]
    • Schedule old packages in Debian bookworm. [ ]
    • Stop scheduling packages for Debian buster. [ ][ ]
    • Don t include PostgreSQL debug output in package lists. [ ]
    • Detect Python library mismatches during build in the node health check. [ ]
    • Update a note on updating the FreeBSD system. [ ]
  • Mattia Rizzolo:
    • Silence a warning from Git. [ ]
    • Update a setting to reflect that Debian bookworm is the new testing. [ ]
    • Upgrade the PostgreSQL database to version 13. [ ]
  • Roland Clobus (Debian live image generation):
    • Workaround non-reproducible config files in the libxml-sax-perl package. [ ]
    • Use the new DNS for the snapshot service. [ ]
  • Vagrant Cascadian:
    • Also note that the armhf architecture also systematically varies by the kernel. [ ]

Contributing If you are interested in contributing to the Reproducible Builds project, please visit our Contribute page on our website. However, you can get in touch with us via:

5 September 2021

Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in August 2021

Welcome to the latest report from the Reproducible Builds project. In this post, we round up the important things that happened in the world of reproducible builds in August 2021. As always, if you are interested in contributing to the project, please visit the Contribute page on our website.
There were a large number of talks related to reproducible builds at DebConf21 this year, the 21st annual conference of the Debian Linux distribution (full schedule):
PackagingCon (@PackagingCon) is new conference for developers of package management software as well as their related communities and stakeholders. The virtual event, which is scheduled to take place on the 9th and 10th November 2021, has a mission is to bring different ecosystems together: from Python s pip to Rust s cargo to Julia s Pkg, from Debian apt over Nix to conda and mamba, and from vcpkg to Spack we hope to have many different approaches to package management at the conference . A number of people from reproducible builds community are planning on attending this new conference, and some may even present. Tickets start at $20 USD.
As reported in our May report, the president of the United States signed an executive order outlining policies aimed to improve the cybersecurity in the US. The executive order comes after a number of highly-publicised security problems such as a ransomware attack that affected an oil pipeline between Texas and New York and the SolarWinds hack that affected a large number of US federal agencies. As a followup this month, however, a detailed fact sheet was released announcing a number large-scale initiatives and that will undoubtedly be related to software supply chain security and, as a result, reproducible builds.
Lastly, We ran another productive meeting on IRC in August (original announcement) which ran for just short of two hours. A full set of notes from the meeting is available.

Software development kpcyrd announced an interesting new project this month called I probably didn t backdoor this which is an attempt to be:
a practical attempt at shipping a program and having reasonably solid evidence there s probably no backdoor. All source code is annotated and there are instructions explaining how to use reproducible builds to rebuild the artifacts distributed in this repository from source. The idea is shifting the burden of proof from you need to prove there s a backdoor to we need to prove there s probably no backdoor . This repository is less about code (we re going to try to keep code at a minimum actually) and instead contains technical writing that explains why these controls are effective and how to verify them. You are very welcome to adopt the techniques used here in your projects. ( )
As the project s README goes on the mention: the techniques used to rebuild the binary artifacts are only possible because the builds for this project are reproducible . This was also announced on our mailing list this month in a thread titled i-probably-didnt-backdoor-this: Reproducible Builds for upstreams. kpcyrd also wrote a detailed blog post about the problems surrounding Linux distributions (such as Alpine and Arch Linux) that distribute compiled Python bytecode in the form of .pyc files generated during the build process.

diffoscope diffoscope is our in-depth and content-aware diff utility. Not only can it locate and diagnose reproducibility issues, it can provide human-readable diffs from many kinds of binary formats. This month, Chris Lamb made a number of changes, including releasing version 180), version 181) and version 182) as well as the following changes:
  • New features:
    • Add support for extracting the signing block from Android APKs. [ ]
    • If we specify a suffix for a temporary file or directory within the code, ensure it starts with an underscore (ie. _ ) to make the generated filenames more human-readable. [ ]
    • Don t include short GCC lines that differ on a single prefix byte either. These are distracting, not very useful and are simply the strings(1) command s idea of the build ID, which is displayed elsewhere in the diff. [ ][ ]
    • Don t include specific .debug-like lines in the ELF-related output, as it is invariably a duplicate of the debug ID that exists better in the readelf(1) differences for this file. [ ]
  • Bug fixes:
    • Add a special case to SquashFS image extraction to not fail if we aren t the superuser. [ ]
    • Only use java -jar /path/to/apksigner.jar if we have an apksigner.jar as newer versions of apksigner in Debian use a shell wrapper script which will be rejected if passed directly to the JVM. [ ]
    • Reduce the maximum line length for calculating Wagner-Fischer, improving the speed of output generation a lot. [ ]
    • Don t require apksigner in order to compare .apk files using apktool. [ ]
    • Update calls (and tests) for the new version of odt2txt. [ ]
  • Output improvements:
    • Mention in the output if the apksigner tool is missing. [ ]
    • Profile diffoscope.diff.linediff and specialize. [ ][ ]
  • Logging improvements:
    • Format debug-level messages related to ELF sections using the diffoscope.utils.format_class. [ ]
    • Print the size of generated reports in the logs (if possible). [ ]
    • Include profiling information in --debug output if --profile is not set. [ ]
  • Codebase improvements:
    • Clarify a comment about the HUGE_TOOLS Python dictionary. [ ]
    • We can pass -f to apktool to avoid creating a strangely-named subdirectory. [ ]
    • Drop an unused File import. [ ]
    • Update the supported & minimum version of Black. [ ]
    • We don t use the logging variable in a specific place, so alias it to an underscore (ie. _ ) instead. [ ]
    • Update some various copyright years. [ ]
    • Clarify a comment. [ ]
  • Test improvements:
    • Update a test to check specific contents of SquashFS listings, otherwise it fails depending on the test systems user ID to username passwd(5) mapping. [ ]
    • Assign seen and expected values to local variables to improve contextual information in failed tests. [ ]
    • Don t print an orphan newline when the source code formatting test passes. [ ]

In addition Santiago Torres Arias added support for Squashfs version 4.5 [ ] and Felix C. Stegerman suggested a number of small improvements to the output of the new APK signing block [ ]. Lastly, Chris Lamb uploaded python-libarchive-c version 3.1-1 to Debian experimental for the new 3.x branch python-libarchive-c is used by diffoscope.

Distribution work In Debian, 68 reviews of packages were added, 33 were updated and 10 were removed this month, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. Two new issue types have been identified too: nondeterministic_ordering_in_todo_items_collected_by_doxygen and kodi_package_captures_build_path_in_source_filename_hash. kpcyrd published another monthly report on their work on reproducible builds within the Alpine and Arch Linux distributions, specifically mentioning rebuilderd, one of the components powering reproducible.archlinux.org. The report also touches on binary transparency, an important component for supply chain security. The @GuixHPC account on Twitter posted an infographic on what fraction of GNU Guix packages are bit-for-bit reproducible: Finally, Bernhard M. Wiedemann posted his monthly reproducible builds status report for openSUSE.

Upstream patches The Reproducible Builds project detects, dissects and attempts to fix as many currently-unreproducible packages as possible. We endeavour to send all of our patches upstream where appropriate. This month, we wrote a large number of such patches, including: Elsewhere, it was discovered that when supporting various new language features and APIs for Android apps, the resulting APK files that are generated now vary wildly from build to build (example diffoscope output). Happily, it appears that a patch has been committed to the relevant source tree. This was also discussed on our mailing list this month in a thread titled Android desugaring and reproducible builds started by Marcus Hoffmann.

Website and documentation There were quite a few changes to the Reproducible Builds website and documentation this month, including:
  • Felix C. Stegerman:
    • Update the website self-build process to not use the buster-backports suite now that Debian Bullseye is the stable release. [ ]
  • Holger Levsen:
    • Add a new page documenting various package rebuilder solutions. [ ]
    • Add some historical talks and slides from DebConf20. [ ][ ]
    • Various improvements to the history page. [ ][ ][ ]
    • Rename the Comparison protocol documentation category to Verification . [ ]
    • Update links to F-Droid documentation. [ ]
  • Ian Muchina:
    • Increase the font size of titles and de-emphasize event details on the talk page. [ ]
    • Rename the README file to README.md to improve the user experience when browsing the Git repository in a web browser. [ ]
  • Mattia Rizzolo:
    • Drop a position:fixed CSS statement that is negatively affecting with some width settings. [ ]
    • Fix the sizing of the elements inside the side navigation bar. [ ]
    • Show gold level sponsors and above in the sidebar. [ ]
    • Updated the documentation within reprotest to mention how ldconfig conflicts with the kernel variation. [ ]
  • Roland Clobus:
    • Added a ticket number for the issue with the live Cinnamon image and diffoscope. [ ]

Testing framework The Reproducible Builds project runs a testing framework at tests.reproducible-builds.org, to check packages and other artifacts for reproducibility. This month, the following changes were made:
  • Holger Levsen:
    • Debian-related changes:
      • Make a large number of changes to support the new Debian bookworm release, including adding it to the dashboard [ ], start scheduling tests [ ], adding suitable Apache redirects [ ] etc. [ ][ ][ ][ ][ ]
      • Make the first build use LANG=C.UTF-8 to match the official Debian build servers. [ ]
      • Only test Debian Live images once a week. [ ]
      • Upgrade all nodes to use Debian Bullseye [ ] [ ]
      • Update README documentation for the Debian Bullseye release. [ ]
    • Other changes:
      • Only include rsync output if the $DEBUG variable is enabled. [ ]
      • Don t try to install mock, a tool used to build Fedora packages some time ago. [ ]
      • Drop an unused function. [ ]
      • Various documentation improvements. [ ][ ]
      • Improve the node health check to detect zombie jobs. [ ]
  • Jessica Clarke (FreeBSD-related changes):
    • Update the location and branch name for the main FreeBSD Git repository. [ ]
    • Correctly ignore the source tarball when comparing build results. [ ]
    • Drop an outdated version number from the documentation. [ ]
  • Mattia Rizzolo:
    • Block F-Droid jobs from running whilst the setup is running. [ ]
    • Enable debugging for the rsync job related to Debian Live images. [ ]
    • Pass BUILD_TAG and BUILD_URL environment for the Debian Live jobs. [ ]
    • Refactor the master_wrapper script to use a Bash array for the parameters. [ ]
    • Prefer YAML s safe_load() function over the unsafe variant. [ ]
    • Use the correct variable in the Apache config to match possible existing files on disk. [ ]
    • Stop issuing HTTP 301 redirects for things that not actually permanent. [ ]
  • Roland Clobus (Debian live image generation):
    • Increase the diffoscope timeout from 120 to 240 minutes; the Cinnamon image should now be able to finish. [ ]
    • Use the new snapshot service. [ ]
    • Make a number of improvements to artifact handling, such as moving the artifacts to the Jenkins host [ ] and correctly cleaning them up at the right time. [ ][ ][ ]
    • Where possible, link to the Jenkins build URL that created the artifacts. [ ][ ]
    • Only allow only one job to run at the same time. [ ]
  • Vagrant Cascadian:
    • Temporarily disable armhf nodes for DebConf21. [ ][ ]

Lastly, if you are interested in contributing to the Reproducible Builds project, please visit the Contribute page on our website. You can get in touch with us via:

9 September 2020

Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in August 2020

Welcome to the August 2020 report from the Reproducible Builds project. In our monthly reports, we summarise the things that we have been up to over the past month. The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to ensure no flaws have been introduced from the original free software source code to the pre-compiled binaries we install on our systems. If you re interested in contributing to the project, please visit our main website.


This month, Jennifer Helsby launched a new reproduciblewheels.com website to address the lack of reproducibility of Python wheels. To quote Jennifer s accompanying explanatory blog post:
One hiccup we ve encountered in SecureDrop development is that not all Python wheels can be built reproducibly. We ship multiple (Python) projects in Debian packages, with Python dependencies included in those packages as wheels. In order for our Debian packages to be reproducible, we need that wheel build process to also be reproducible
Parallel to this, transparencylog.com was also launched, a service that verifies the contents of URLs against a publicly recorded cryptographic log. It keeps an append-only log of the cryptographic digests of all URLs it has seen. (GitHub repo) On 18th September, Bernhard M. Wiedemann will give a presentation in German, titled Wie reproducible builds Software sicherer machen ( How reproducible builds make software more secure ) at the Internet Security Digital Days 2020 conference.

Reproducible builds at DebConf20 There were a number of talks at the recent online-only DebConf20 conference on the topic of reproducible builds. Holger gave a talk titled Reproducing Bullseye in practice , focusing on independently verifying that the binaries distributed from ftp.debian.org are made from their claimed sources. It also served as a general update on the status of reproducible builds within Debian. The video (145 MB) and slides are available. There were also a number of other talks that involved Reproducible Builds too. For example, the Malayalam language mini-conference had a talk titled , ? ( I want to join Debian, what should I do? ) presented by Praveen Arimbrathodiyil, the Clojure Packaging Team BoF session led by Elana Hashman, as well as Where is Salsa CI right now? that was on the topic of Salsa, the collaborative development server that Debian uses to provide the necessary tools for package maintainers, packaging teams and so on. Jonathan Bustillos (Jathan) also gave a talk in Spanish titled Un camino verificable desde el origen hasta el binario ( A verifiable path from source to binary ). (Video, 88MB)

Development work After many years of development work, the compiler for the Rust programming language now generates reproducible binary code. This generated some general discussion on Reddit on the topic of reproducibility in general. Paul Spooren posted a request for comments to OpenWrt s openwrt-devel mailing list asking for clarification on when to raise the PKG_RELEASE identifier of a package. This is needed in order to successfully perform rebuilds in a reproducible builds context. In openSUSE, Bernhard M. Wiedemann published his monthly Reproducible Builds status update. Chris Lamb provided some comments and pointers on an upstream issue regarding the reproducibility of a Snap / SquashFS archive file. [ ]

Debian Holger Levsen identified that a large number of Debian .buildinfo build certificates have been tainted on the official Debian build servers, as these environments have files underneath the /usr/local/sbin directory [ ]. He also filed against bug for debrebuild after spotting that it can fail to download packages from snapshot.debian.org [ ]. This month, several issues were uncovered (or assisted) due to the efforts of reproducible builds. For instance, Debian bug #968710 was filed by Simon McVittie, which describes a problem with detached debug symbol files (required to generate a traceback) that is unlikely to have been discovered without reproducible builds. In addition, Jelmer Vernooij called attention that the new Debian Janitor tool is using the property of reproducibility (as well as diffoscope when applying archive-wide changes to Debian:
New merge proposals also include a link to the diffoscope diff between a vanilla build and the build with changes. Unfortunately these can be a bit noisy for packages that are not reproducible yet, due to the difference in build environment between the two builds. [ ]
56 reviews of Debian packages were added, 38 were updated and 24 were removed this month adding to our knowledge about identified issues. Specifically, Chris Lamb added and categorised the nondeterministic_version_generated_by_python_param and the lessc_nondeterministic_keys toolchain issues. [ ][ ] Holger Levsen sponsored Lukas Puehringer s upload of the python-securesystemslib pacage, which is a dependency of in-toto, a framework to secure the integrity of software supply chains. [ ] Lastly, Chris Lamb further refined his merge request against the debian-installer component to allow all arguments from sources.list files (such as [check-valid-until=no]) in order that we can test the reproducibility of the installer images on the Reproducible Builds own testing infrastructure and sent a ping to the team that maintains that code.

Upstream patches The Reproducible Builds project detects, dissects and attempts to fix as many currently-unreproducible packages as possible. We endeavour to send all of our patches upstream where appropriate. This month, we wrote a large number of these patches, including:

diffoscope diffoscope is our in-depth and content-aware diff utility that can not only locate and diagnose reproducibility issues, it provides human-readable diffs of all kinds. In August, Chris Lamb made the following changes to diffoscope, including preparing and uploading versions 155, 156, 157 and 158 to Debian:
  • New features:
    • Support extracting data of PGP signed data. (#214)
    • Try files named .pgp against pgpdump(1) to determine whether they are Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) files. (#211)
    • Support multiple options for all file extension matching. [ ]
  • Bug fixes:
    • Don t raise an exception when we encounter XML files with <!ENTITY> declarations inside the Document Type Definition (DTD), or when a DTD or entity references an external resource. (#212)
    • pgpdump(1) can successfully parse some binary files, so check that the parsed output contains something sensible before accepting it. [ ]
    • Temporarily drop gnumeric from the Debian build-dependencies as it has been removed from the testing distribution. (#968742)
    • Correctly use fallback_recognises to prevent matching .xsb binary XML files.
    • Correct identify signed PGP files as file(1) returns data . (#211)
  • Logging improvements:
    • Emit a message when ppudump version does not match our file header. [ ]
    • Don t use Python s repr(object) output in Calling external command messages. [ ]
    • Include the filename in the not identified by any comparator message. [ ]
  • Codebase improvements:
    • Bump Python requirement from 3.6 to 3.7. Most distributions are either shipping with Python 3.5 or 3.7, so supporting 3.6 is not only somewhat unnecessary but also cumbersome to test locally. [ ]
    • Drop some unused imports [ ], drop an unnecessary dictionary comprehensions [ ] and some unnecessary control flow [ ].
    • Correct typo of output in a comment. [ ]
  • Release process:
    • Move generation of debian/tests/control to an external script. [ ]
    • Add some URLs for the site that will appear on PyPI.org. [ ]
    • Update author and author email in setup.py for PyPI.org and similar. [ ]
  • Testsuite improvements:
    • Update PPU tests for compatibility with Free Pascal versions 3.2.0 or greater. (#968124)
    • Mark that our identification test for .ppu files requires ppudump version 3.2.0 or higher. [ ]
    • Add an assert_diff helper that loads and compares a fixture output. [ ][ ][ ][ ]
  • Misc:
In addition, Mattia Rizzolo documented in setup.py that diffoscope works with Python version 3.8 [ ] and Frazer Clews applied some Pylint suggestions [ ] and removed some deprecated methods [ ].

Website This month, Chris Lamb updated the main Reproducible Builds website and documentation to:
  • Clarify & fix a few entries on the who page [ ][ ] and ensure that images do not get to large on some viewports [ ].
  • Clarify use of a pronoun re. Conservancy. [ ]
  • Use View all our monthly reports over View all monthly reports . [ ]
  • Move a is a suffix out of the link target on the SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH age. [ ]
In addition, Javier Jard n added the freedesktop-sdk project [ ] and Kushal Das added SecureDrop project [ ] to our projects page. Lastly, Michael P hn added internationalisation and translation support with help from Hans-Christoph Steiner [ ].

Testing framework The Reproducible Builds project operate a Jenkins-based testing framework to power tests.reproducible-builds.org. This month, Holger Levsen made the following changes:
  • System health checks:
    • Improve explanation how the status and scores are calculated. [ ][ ]
    • Update and condense view of detected issues. [ ][ ]
    • Query the canonical configuration file to determine whether a job is disabled instead of duplicating/hardcoding this. [ ]
    • Detect several problems when updating the status of reporting-oriented metapackage sets. [ ]
    • Detect when diffoscope is not installable [ ] and failures in DNS resolution [ ].
  • Debian:
    • Update the URL to the Debian security team bug tracker s Git repository. [ ]
    • Reschedule the unstable and bullseye distributions often for the arm64 architecture. [ ]
    • Schedule buster less often for armhf. [ ][ ][ ]
    • Force the build of certain packages in the work-in-progress package rebuilder. [ ][ ]
    • Only update the stretch and buster base build images when necessary. [ ]
  • Other distributions:
    • For F-Droid, trigger jobs by commits, not by a timer. [ ]
    • Disable the Archlinux HTML page generation job as it has never worked. [ ]
    • Disable the alternative OpenWrt rebuilder jobs. [ ]
  • Misc;
Many other changes were made too, including:
  • Chris Lamb:
    • Use <pre> HTML tags when dumping fixed-width debugging data in the self-serve package scheduler. [ ]
  • Mattia Rizzolo:
  • Vagrant Cascadian:
    • Mark that the u-boot Universal Boot Loader should not build architecture independent packages on the arm64 architecture anymore. [ ]
Finally, build node maintenance was performed by Holger Levsen [ ], Mattia Rizzolo [ ][ ] and Vagrant Cascadian [ ][ ][ ][ ]

Mailing list On our mailing list this month, Leo Wandersleb sent a message to the list after he was wondering how to expand his WalletScrutiny.com project (which aims to improve the security of Bitcoin wallets) from Android wallets to also monitor Linux wallets as well:
If you think you know how to spread the word about reproducibility in the context of Bitcoin wallets through WalletScrutiny, your contributions are highly welcome on this PR [ ]
Julien Lepiller posted to the list linking to a blog post by Tavis Ormandy titled You don t need reproducible builds. Morten Linderud (foxboron) responded with a clear rebuttal that Tavis was only considering the narrow use-case of proprietary vendors and closed-source software. He additionally noted that the criticism that reproducible builds cannot prevent against backdoors being deliberately introduced into the upstream source ( bugdoors ) are decidedly (and deliberately) outside the scope of reproducible builds to begin with. Chris Lamb included the Reproducible Builds mailing list in a wider discussion regarding a tentative proposal to include .buildinfo files in .deb packages, adding his remarks regarding requiring a custom tool in order to determine whether generated build artifacts are identical in a reproducible context. [ ] Jonathan Bustillos (Jathan) posted a quick email to the list requesting whether there was a list of To do tasks in Reproducible Builds. Lastly, Chris Lamb responded at length to a query regarding the status of reproducible builds for Debian ISO or installation images. He noted that most of the technical work has been performed but there are at least four issues until they can be generally advertised as such . He pointed that the privacy-oriented Tails operation system, which is based directly on Debian, has had reproducible builds for a number of years now. [ ]

If you are interested in contributing to the Reproducible Builds project, please visit our Contribute page on our website. However, you can get in touch with us via:

11 March 2020

Markus Koschany: My Free Software Activities in February 2020

Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report (+ the first week in March) that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you. Debian Games Debian Java Misc Debian LTS This was my 48. month as a paid contributor and I have been paid to work 10 hours on Debian LTS, a project started by Rapha l Hertzog. In that time I did the following: ELTS Extended Long Term Support (ELTS) is a project led by Freexian to further extend the lifetime of Debian releases. It is not an official Debian project but all Debian users benefit from it without cost. The current ELTS release is Debian 7 Wheezy . This was my 21. month and I have been paid to work 8 hours on ELTS. Thanks for reading and see you next time.

16 August 2017

Simon McVittie: DebConf 17: Flatpak and Debian

The indoor garden at Coll ge de Maisonneuve, the DebConf 17 venue
Decorative photo of the indoor garden
I'm currently at DebConf 17 in Montr al, back at DebConf for the first time in 10 years (last time was DebConf 7 in Edinburgh). It's great to put names to faces and meet more of my co-developers in person! On Monday I gave a talk entitled A Debian maintainer's guide to Flatpak , aiming to introduce Debian developers to Flatpak, and show how Flatpak and Debian (and Debian derivatives like SteamOS) can help each other. It seems to have been quite well received, with people generally positive about the idea of using Flatpak to deliver backports and faster-moving leaf packages (games!) onto the stable base platform that Debian is so good at providing. A video of the talk is available from the Debian Meetings Archive. I've also put up my slides in the DebConf git-annex repository, with some small edits to link to more source code: A Debian maintainer's guide to Flatpak. Source code for the slides is also available from Collabora's git server. The next step is to take my proof-of-concept for building Flatpak runtimes and apps from Debian and SteamOS packages, flatdeb, get it a bit more production-ready, and perhaps start publishing some sample runtimes from a cron job on a Debian or Collabora server. (By the way, if you downloaded that source right after my talk, please update - I've now pushed some late changes that were necessary to fix the 3D drivers for my OpenArena demo.) I don't think Debian will be going quite as far as Endless any time soon: as Cosimo outlined in the talk right before mine, they deploy their Debian derivative as an immutable base OS with libOSTree, with all the user-installable modules above that coming from Flatpak. That model is certainly an interesting thing to think about for Debian derivatives, though: at Collabora we work on a lot of appliance-like embedded Debian derivatives, with a lot of flexibility during development but very limited state on deployed systems, and Endless' approach seems a perfect fit for those situations. [Edited 2017-08-16 to fix the link for the slides, and add links for the video]

23 March 2017

Simon McVittie: GTK hackfest 2017: D-Bus communication with containers

At the GTK hackfest in London (which accidentally became mostly a Flatpak hackfest) I've mainly been looking into how to make D-Bus work better for app container technologies like Flatpak and Snap. The initial motivating use cases are: At the moment, Flatpak runs a D-Bus proxy for each app instance that has access to D-Bus, connects to the appropriate bus on the app's behalf, and passes messages through. That proxy is in a container similar to the actual app instance, but not actually the same container; it is trusted to not pass messages through that it shouldn't pass through. The app-identification mechanism works in practice, but is Flatpak-specific, and has a known race condition due to process ID reuse and limitations in the metadata that the Linux kernel maintains for AF_UNIX sockets. In practice the use of X11 rather than Wayland in current systems is a much larger loophole in the container than this race condition, but we want to do better in future. Meanwhile, Snap does its sandboxing with AppArmor, on kernels where it is enabled both at compile-time (Ubuntu, openSUSE, Debian, Debian derivatives like Tails) and at runtime (Ubuntu, openSUSE and Tails, but not Debian by default). Ubuntu's kernel has extra AppArmor features that haven't yet gone upstream, some of which provide reliable app identification via LSM labels, which dbus-daemon can learn by querying its AF_UNIX socket. However, other kernels like the ones in openSUSE and Debian don't have those. The access-control (AppArmor mediation) is implemented in upstream dbus-daemon, but again doesn't work portably, and is not sufficiently fine-grained or flexible to do some of the things we'll likely want to do, particularly in dconf. After a lot of discussion with dconf maintainer Allison Lortie and Flatpak maintainer Alexander Larsson, I think I have a plan for fixing this. This is all subject to change: see fd.o #100344 for the latest ideas. Identity model Each user (uid) has some uncontained processes, plus 0 or more containers. The uncontained processes include dbus-daemon itself, desktop environment components such as gnome-session and gnome-shell, the container managers like Flatpak and Snap, and so on. They have the user's full privileges, and in particular they are allowed to do privileged things on the user's session bus (like running dbus-monitor), and act with the user's full privileges on the system bus. In generic information security jargon, they are the trusted computing base; in AppArmor jargon, they are unconfined. The containers are Flatpak apps, or Snap apps, or other app-container technologies like Firejail and AppImage (if they adopt this mechanism, which I hope they will), or even a mixture (different app-container technologies can coexist on a single system). They are containers (or container instances) and not "apps", because in principle, you could install com.example.MyApp 1.0, run it, and while it's still running, upgrade to com.example.MyApp 2.0 and run that; you'd have two containers for the same app, perhaps with different permissions. Each container has an container type, which is a reversed DNS name like org.flatpak or io.snapcraft representing the container technology, and an app identifier, an arbitrary non-empty string whose meaning is defined by the container technology. For Flatpak, that string would be another reversed DNS name like com.example.MyGreatApp; for Snap, as far as I can tell it would look like example-my-great-app. The container technology can also put arbitrary metadata on the D-Bus representation of a container, again defined and namespaced by the container technology. For instance, Flatpak would use some serialization of the same fields that go in the Flatpak metadata file at the moment. Finally, the container has an opaque container identifier identifying a particular container instance. For example, launching com.example.MyApp twice (maybe different versions or with different command-line options to flatpak run) might result in two containers with different privileges, so they need to have different container identifiers. Contained server sockets App-container managers like Flatpak and Snap would create an AF_UNIX socket inside the container, bind() it to an address that will be made available to the contained processes, and listen(), but not accept() any new connections. Instead, they would fd-pass the new socket to the dbus-daemon by calling a new method, and the dbus-daemon would proceed to accept() connections after the app-container manager has signalled that it has called both bind() and listen(). (See fd.o #100344 for full details.) Processes inside the container must not be allowed to contact the AF_UNIX socket used by the wider, uncontained system - if they could, the dbus-daemon wouldn't be able to distinguish between them and uncontained processes and we'd be back where we started. Instead, they should have the new socket bind-mounted into their container's XDG_RUNTIME_DIR and connect to that, or have the new socket set as their DBUS_SESSION_BUS_ADDRESS and be prevented from connecting to the uncontained socket in some other way. Those familiar with the kdbus proposals a while ago might recognise this as being quite similar to kdbus' concept of endpoints, and I'm considering reusing that name. Along with the socket, the container manager would pass in the container's identity and metadata, and the method would return a unique, opaque identifier for this particular container instance. The basic fields (container technology, technology-specific app ID, container ID) should probably be added to the result of GetConnectionCredentials(), and there should be a new API call to get all of those plus the arbitrary technology-specific metadata. When a process from a container connects to the contained server socket, every message that it sends should also have the container instance ID in a new header field. This is OK even though dbus-daemon does not (in general) forbid sender-specified future header fields, because any dbus-daemon that supported this new feature would guarantee to set that header field correctly, the existing Flatpak D-Bus proxy already filters out unknown header fields, and adding this header field is only ever a reduction in privilege. The reasoning for using the sender's container instance ID (as opposed to the sender's unique name) is for services like dconf to be able to treat multiple unique bus names as belonging to the same equivalence class of contained processes: instead of having to look up the container metadata once per unique name, dconf can look it up once per container instance the first time it sees a new identifier in a header field. For the second and subsequent unique names in the container, dconf can know that the container metadata and permissions are identical to the one it already saw. Access control In principle, we could have the new identification feature without adding any new access control, by keeping Flatpak's proxies. However, in the short term that would mean we'd be adding new API to set up a socket for a container without any access control, and having to keep the proxies anyway, which doesn't seem great; in the longer term, I think we'd find ourselves adding a second new API to set up a socket for a container with new access control. So we might as well bite the bullet and go for the version with access control immediately. In principle, we could also avoid the need for new access control by ensuring that each service that will serve contained clients does its own. However, that makes it really hard to send broadcasts and not have them unintentionally leak information to contained clients - we would need to do something more like kdbus' approach to multicast, where services know who has subscribed to their multicast signals, and that is just not how dbus-daemon works at the moment. If we're going to have access control for broadcasts, it might as well also cover unicast. The plan is that messages from containers to the outside world will be mediated by a new access control mechanism, in parallel with dbus-daemon's current support for firewall-style rules in the XML bus configuration, AppArmor mediation, and SELinux mediation. A message would only be allowed through if the XML configuration, the new container access control mechanism, and the LSM (if any) all agree it should be allowed. By default, processes in a container can send broadcast signals, and send method calls and unicast signals to other processes in the same container. They can also receive method calls from outside the container (so that interfaces like org.freedesktop.Application can work), and send exactly one reply to each of those method calls. They cannot own bus names, communicate with other containers, or send file descriptors (which reduces the scope for denial of service). Obviously, that's not going to be enough for a lot of contained apps, so we need a way to add more access. I'm intending this to be purely additive (start by denying everything except what is always allowed, then add new rules), not a mixture of adding and removing access like the current XML policy language. There are two ways we've identified for rules to be added: Initially, many contained apps would work in the first way (and in particular sockets=session-bus would add a rule that allows almost everything), while over time we'll probably want to head towards recommending more use of the second. Related topics Access control on the system bus We talked about the possibility of using a very similar ruleset to control access to the system bus, as an alternative to the XML rules found in /etc/dbus-1/system.d and /usr/share/dbus-1/system.d. We didn't really come to a conclusion here. Allison had the useful insight that the XML rules are acting like a firewall: they're something that is placed in front of potentially-broken services, and not part of the services themselves (which, as with firewalls like ufw, makes it seem rather odd when the services themselves install rules). D-Bus system services already have total control over what requests they will accept from D-Bus peers, and if they rely on the XML rules to mediate that access, they're essentially rejecting that responsibility and hoping the dbus-daemon will protect them. The D-Bus maintainers would much prefer it if system services took responsibility for their own access control (with or without using polkit), because fundamentally the system service is always going to understand its domain and its intended security model better than the dbus-daemon can. Analogously, when a network service listens on all addresses and accepts requests from elsewhere on the LAN, we sometimes work around that by protecting it with a firewall, but the optimal resolution is to get that network service fixed to do proper authentication and access control instead. For system services, we continue to recommend essentially this "firewall" configuration, filling in the $ variables as appropriate:
<busconfig>
    <policy user="$ the daemon uid under which the service runs ">
        <allow own="$ the service's bus name "/>
    </policy>
    <policy context="default">
        <allow send_destination="$ the service's bus name "/>
    </policy>
</busconfig>
We discussed the possibility of moving towards a model where the daemon uid to be allowed is written in the .service file, together with an opt-in to "modern D-Bus access control" that makes the "firewall" unnecessary; after some flag day when all significant system services follow that pattern, dbus-daemon would even have the option of no longer applying the "firewall" (moving to an allow-by-default model) and just refusing to activate system services that have not opted in to being safe to use without it. However, the "firewall" also protects system bus clients, and services like Avahi that are not bus-activatable, against unintended access, which is harder to solve via that approach; so this is going to take more thought. For system services' clients that follow the "agent" pattern (BlueZ, polkit, NetworkManager, Geoclue), the correct "firewall" configuration is more complicated. At some point I'll try to write up a best-practice for these. New header fields for the system bus At the moment, it's harder than it needs to be to provide non-trivial access control on the system bus, because on receiving a method call, a service has to remember what was in the method call, then call GetConnectionCredentials() to find out who sent it, then only process the actual request when it has the information necessary to do access control. Allison and I had hoped to resolve this by adding new D-Bus message header fields with the user ID, the LSM label, and other interesting facts for access control. These could be "opt-in" to avoid increasing message sizes for no reason: in particular, it is not typically useful for session services to receive the user ID, because only one user ID is allowed to connect to the session bus anyway. Unfortunately, the dbus-daemon currently lets unknown fields through without modification. With hindsight this seems an unwise design choice, because header fields are a finite resource (there are 255 possible header fields) and are defined by the D-Bus Specification. The only field that can currently be trusted is the sender's unique name, because the dbus-daemon sets that field, overwriting the value in the original message (if any). To make it safe to rely on the new fields, we would have to make the dbus-daemon filter out all unknown header fields, and introduce a mechanism for the service to check (during connection to the bus) whether the dbus-daemon is sufficiently new that it does so. If connected to an older dbus-daemon, the service would not be able to rely on the new fields being true, so it would have to ignore the new fields and treat them as unset. The specification is sufficiently vague that making new dbus-daemons filter out unknown header fields is a valid change (it just says that "Header fields with an unknown or unexpected field code must be ignored", without specifying who must ignore them, so having the dbus-daemon delete those fields seems spec-compliant). This all seemed fine when we discussed it in person; but GDBus already has accessors for arbitrary header fields by numeric ID, and I'm concerned that this might mean it's too easy for a system service to be accidentally insecure: It would be natural (but wrong!) for an implementor to assume that if g_message_get_header (message, G_DBUS_MESSAGE_HEADER_FIELD_SENDER_UID) returned non-NULL, then that was guaranteed to be the correct, valid sender uid. As a result, fd.o #100317 might have to be abandoned. I think more thought is needed on that one. Unrelated topics As happens at any good meeting, we took the opportunity of high-bandwidth discussion to cover many useful things and several useless ones. Other discussions that I got into during the hackfest included, in no particular order: More notes are available from the GNOME wiki. Acknowledgements The GTK hackfest was organised by GNOME and hosted by Red Hat and Endless. My attendance was sponsored by Collabora. Thanks to all the sponsors and organisers, and the developers and organisations who attended.

19 October 2016

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 77 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday October 9 and Saturday October 15 2016: Media coverage Documentation update After discussions with HW42, Steven Chamberlain, Vagrant Cascadian, Daniel Shahaf, Christopher Berg, Daniel Kahn Gillmor and others, Ximin Luo has started writing up more concrete and detailed design plans for setting SOURCE_ROOT_DIR for reproducible debugging symbols, buildinfo security semantics and buildinfo security infrastructure. Toolchain development and fixes Dmitry Shachnev noted that our patch for #831779 has been temporarily rejected by docutils upstream; we are trying to persuade them again. Tony Mancill uploaded javatools/0.59 to unstable containing original patch by Chris Lamb. This fixed an issue where documentation Recommends: substvars would not be reproducible. Ximin Luo filed bug 77985 to GCC as a pre-requisite for future patches to make debugging symbols reproducible. Packages reviewed and fixed, and bugs filed The following updated packages have become reproducible - in our current test setup - after being fixed: The following updated packages appear to be reproducible now, for reasons we were not able to figure out. (Relevant changelogs did not mention reproducible builds.) Some uploads have addressed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Some uploads have addressed nearly all reproducibility issues, except for build path issues: Patches submitted that have not made their way to the archive yet: Reviews of unreproducible packages 101 package reviews have been added, 49 have been updated and 4 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. 3 issue types have been updated: Weekly QA work During of reproducibility testing, some FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by: tests.reproducible-builds.org Debian: Openwrt/LEDE/NetBSD/coreboot/Fedora/archlinux: Misc. We are running a poll to find a good time for an IRC meeting. This week's edition was written by Ximin Luo, Holger Levsen & Chris Lamb and reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC.

6 October 2016

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 75 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday September 25 and Saturday October 1 2016: Statistics For the first time, we reached 91% reproducible packages in our testing framework on testing/amd64 using a determistic build path. (This is what we recommend to make packages in Stretch reproducible.) For unstable/amd64, where we additionally test for reproducibility across different build paths we are at almost 76% again. IRC meetings We have a poll to set a time for a new regular IRC meeting. If you would like to attend, please input your available times and we will try to accommodate for you. There was a trial IRC meeting on Friday, 2016-09-31 1800 UTC. Unfortunately, we did not activate meetbot. Despite this participants consider the meeting a success as several topics where discussed (eg changes to IRC notifications of tests.r-b.o) and the meeting stayed within one our length. Upcoming events Reproduce and Verify Filesystems - Vincent Batts, Red Hat - Berlin (Germany), 5th October, 14:30 - 15:20 @ LinuxCon + ContainerCon Europe 2016. From Reproducible Debian builds to Reproducible OpenWrt, LEDE & coreboot - Holger "h01ger" Levsen and Alexander "lynxis" Couzens - Berlin (Germany), 13th October, 11:00 - 11:25 @ OpenWrt Summit 2016. Introduction to Reproducible Builds - Vagrant Cascadian will be presenting at the SeaGL.org Conference In Seattle (USA), November 11th-12th, 2016. Previous events GHC Determinism - Bartosz Nitka, Facebook - Nara (Japan), 24th September, ICPF 2016. Toolchain development and fixes Michael Meskes uploaded bsdmainutils/9.0.11 to unstable with a fix for #830259 based on Reiner Herrmann's patch. This fixed locale_dependent_symbol_order_by_lorder issue in the affected packages (freebsd-libs, mmh). devscripts/2.16.8 was uploaded to unstable. It includes a debrepro script by Antonio Terceiro which is similar in purpose to reprotest but more lightweight; specific to Debian packages and without support for virtual servers or configurable variations. Packages reviewed and fixed, and bugs filed The following updated packages have become reproducible in our testing framework after being fixed: The following updated packages appear to be reproducible now for reasons we were not able to figure out. (Relevant changelogs did not mention reproducible builds.) Some uploads have addressed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Patches submitted that have not made their way to the archive yet: Reviews of unreproducible packages 77 package reviews have been added, 178 have been updated and 80 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. 6 issue types have been updated: Weekly QA work As part of reproducibility testing, FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by: diffoscope development A new version of diffoscope 61 was uploaded to unstable by Chris Lamb. It included contributions from: Post-release there were further contributions from: reprotest development A new version of reprotest 0.3.2 was uploaded to unstable by Ximin Luo. It included contributions from: Post-release there were further contributions from: tests.reproducible-builds.org Misc. This week's edition was written by Ximin Luo, Holger Levsen & Chris Lamb and reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC.

24 July 2016

Gregor Herrmann: RC bugs 2016/01-29

seems I've neglected both my blog & my RC bug fixing activities in the last months. anyway, since I still keep track of RC bugs I worked on, I thought I might as well publish the list:

20 June 2016

Simon McVittie: GTK Hackfest 2016

I'm back from the GTK hackfest in Toronto, Canada and mostly recovered from jetlag, so it's time to write up my notes on what we discussed there. Despite the hackfest's title, I was mainly there to talk about non-GUI parts of the stack, and technologies that fit more closely in what could be seen as the freedesktop.org platform than they do in GNOME. In particular, I'm interested in Flatpak as a way to deploy self-contained "apps" in a freedesktop-based, sandboxed runtime environment layered over the Universal Operating System and its many derivatives, with both binary and source compatibility with other GNU/Linux distributions. I'm mainly only writing about discussions I was directly involved in: lots of what sounded like good discussion about the actual graphics toolkit went over my head completely :-) More notes, mostly from Matthias Clasen, are available on the GNOME wiki. In no particular order: Thinking with portals We spent some time discussing Flatpak's portals, mostly on Tuesday. These are the components that expose a subset of desktop functionality as D-Bus services that can be used by contained applications: they are part of the security boundary between a contained app and the rest of the desktop session. Android's intents are a similar concept seen elsewhere. While the portals are primarily designed for Flatpak, there's no real reason why they couldn't be used by other app-containment solutions such as Canonical's Snap. One major topic of discussion was their overall design and layout. Most portals will consist of a UX-independent part in Flatpak itself, together with a UX-specific implementation of any user interaction the portal needs. For example, the portal for file selection has a D-Bus service in Flatpak, which interacts with some UX-specific service that will pop up a standard UX-specific "Open" dialog for GNOME and probably other GTK environments, that dialog is in (a branch of) GTK. A design principle that was reiterated in this discussion is that the UX-independent part should do as much as possible, with the UX-specific part only carrying out the user interactions that need to comply with a particular UX design (in the GTK case, GNOME's design). This minimizes the amount of work that needs to be redone for other desktop or embedded environments, while still ensuring that the other environments can have their chosen UX design. In particular, it's important that, as much as possible, the security- and performance-sensitive work (such as data transport and authentication) is shared between all environments. The aim is for portals to get the user's permission to carry out actions, while keeping it as implicit as possible, avoiding an "are you sure?" step where feasible. For example, if an application asks to open a file, the user's permission is implicitly given by them selecting the file in the file-chooser dialog and pressing OK: if they do not want this application to open a file at all, they can deny permission by cancelling. Similarly, if an application asks to stream webcam data, the UX we expect is for GNOME's Cheese app (or a similar non-GNOME app) to appear, open the webcam to provide a preview window so they can see what they are about to send, but not actually start sending the stream to the requesting app until the user has pressed a "Start" button. When defining the API "contracts" to be provided by applications in that situation, we will need to be clear about whether the provider is expected to obtain confirmation like this: in most cases I would anticipate that it is. One security trade-off here is that we have to have a small amount of trust in the providing app. For example, continuing the example of Cheese as a webcam provider, Cheese could (and perhaps should) be a contained app itself, whether via something like Flatpak, an LSM like AppArmor or both. If Cheese is compromised somehow, then whenever it is running, it would be technically possible for it to open the webcam, stream video and send it to a hostile third-party application. We concluded that this is an acceptable trade-off: each application needs to be trusted with the privileges that it needs to do its job, and we should not put up barriers that are easy to circumvent or otherwise serve no purpose. The main (only?) portal so far is the file chooser, in which the contained application asks the wider system to show an "Open..." dialog, and if the user selects a file, it is returned to the contained application through a FUSE filesystem, the document portal. The reference implementation of the UX for this is in GTK, and is basically a GtkFileChooserDialog. The intention is that other environments such as KDE will substitute their own equivalent. Other planned portals include: Environment variables GNOME on Wayland currently has a problem with environment variables: there are some traditional ways to set environment variables for X11 sessions or login shells using shell script fragments (/etc/X11/Xsession.d, /etc/X11/xinit/xinitrc.d, /etc/profile.d), but these do not apply to Wayland, or to noninteractive login environments like cron and systemd --user. We are also keen to avoid requiring a Turing-complete shell language during session startup, because it's difficult to reason about and potentially rather inefficient. Some uses of environment variables can be dismissed as unnecessary or even unwanted, similar to the statement in Debian Policy 9.9: "A program must not depend on environment variables to get reasonable defaults." However, there are two common situations where environment variables can be necessary for proper OS integration: search-paths like $PATH, $XDG_DATA_DIRS and $PYTHONPATH (particularly necessary for things like Flatpak), and optionally-loaded modules like $GTK_MODULES and $QT_ACCESSIBILITY where a package influences the configuration of another package. There is a stopgap solution in GNOME's gdm display manager, /usr/share/gdm/env.d, but this is gdm-specific and insufficiently expressive to provide the functionality needed by Flatpak: "set XDG_DATA_DIRS to its specified default value if unset, then add a couple of extra paths". pam_env comes closer PAM is run at every transition from "no user logged in" to "user can execute arbitrary code as themselves" but it doesn't support .d fragments, which are required if we want distribution packages to be able to extend search paths. pam_env also turns off per-user configuration by default, citing security concerns. I'll write more about this when I have a concrete proposal for how to solve it. I think the best solution is probably a PAM module similar to pam_env but supporting .d directories, either by modifying pam_env directly or out-of-tree, combined with clarifying what the security concerns for per-user configuration are and how they can be avoided. Relocatable binary packages On Windows and OS X, various GLib APIs automatically discover where the application binary is located and use search paths relative to that; for example, if C:\myprefix\bin\app.exe is running, GLib might put C:\myprefix\share into the result of g_get_system_data_dirs(), so that the application can ask to load app/data.xml from the data directories and get C:\myprefix\share\app\data.xml. We would like to be able to do the same on Linux, for example so that the apps in a Flatpak or Snap package can be constructed from RPM or dpkg packages without needing to be recompiled for a different --prefix, and so that other third-party software packages like the games on Steam and gog.com can easily locate their own resources. Relatedly, there are currently no well-defined semantics for what happens when a .desktop file or a D-Bus .service file has Exec=./bin/foo. The meaning of Exec=foo is well-defined (it searches $PATH) and the meaning of Exec=/opt/whatever/bin/foo is obvious. When this came up in D-Bus previously, my assertion was that the meaning should be the same as in .desktop files, whatever that is. We agreed to propose that the meaning of a non-absolute path in a .desktop or .service file should be interpreted relative to the directory where the .desktop or .service file was found: for example, if /opt/whatever/share/applications/foo.desktop says Exec=../../bin/foo, then /opt/whatever/bin/foo would be the right thing to execute. While preparing a mail to the freedesktop and D-Bus mailing lists proposing this, I found that I had proposed the same thing almost 2 years ago... this time I hope I can actually make it happen! Flatpak and OSTree bug fixing On the way to the hackfest, and while the discussion moved to topics that I didn't have useful input on, I spent some time fixing up the Debian packaging for Flatpak and its dependencies. In particular, I did my first upload as a co-maintainer of bubblewrap, uploaded ostree to unstable (with the known limitation that the grub, dracut and systemd integration is missing for now since I haven't been able to test it yet), got most of the way through packaging Flatpak 0.6.5 (which I'll upload soon), cherry-picked the right patches to make ostree compile on Debian 8 in an effort to make backports trivial, and spent some time disentangling a flatpak test failure which was breaking the Debian package's installed-tests. I'm still looking into ostree test failures on little-endian MIPS, which I was able to reproduce on a Debian porterbox just before the end of the hackfest. OSTree + Debian I also had some useful conversations with developers from Endless, who recently opened up a version of their OSTree build scripts for public access. Hopefully that information brings me a bit closer to being able to publish a walkthrough for how to deploy a simple Debian derivative using OSTree (help with that is very welcome of course!). GTK life-cycle and versioning The life-cycle of GTK releases has already been mentioned here and elsewhere, and there are some interesting responses in the comments on my earlier blog post. It's important to note that what we discussed at the hackfest is only a proposal: a hackfest discussion between a subset of the GTK maintainers and a small number of other GTK users (I am in the latter category) doesn't, and shouldn't, set policy for all of GTK or for all of GNOME. I believe the intention is that the GTK maintainers will discuss the proposals further at GUADEC, and make a decision after that. As I said before, I hope that being more realistic about API and ABI guarantees can avoid GTK going too far towards either of the possible extremes: either becoming unable to advance because it's too constrained by compatibility, or breaking applications because it isn't constrained enough. The current situation, where it is meant to be compatible within the GTK 3 branch but in practice applications still sometimes break, doesn't seem ideal for anyone, and I hope we can do better in future. Acknowledgements Thanks to everyone involved, particularly:

14 June 2016

Simon McVittie: GTK versioning and distributions

Allison Lortie has provoked a lot of comment with her blog post on a new proposal for how GTK is versioned. Here's some more context from the discussion at the GTK hackfest that prompted that proposal: there's actually quite a close analogy in how new Debian versions are developed. The problem we're trying to address here is the two sides of a trade-off: Historically, GTK has aimed to keep compatible within a major version, where major versions are rather far apart (GTK 1 in 1998, GTK 2 in 2002, GTK 3 in 2011, GTK 4 somewhere in the future). Meanwhile, fixing bugs, improving performance and introducing new features sometimes results in major changes behind the scenes. In an ideal world, these behind-the-scenes changes would never break applications; however, the world isn't ideal. (The Debian analogy here is that as much as we aspire to having the upgrade from one stable release to the next not break anything at all, I don't think we've ever achieved that in practice - we still ask users to read the release notes, even though ideally that wouldn't be necessary.) In particular, the perceived cost of doing a proper ABI break (a fully parallel-installable GTK 4) means there's a strong temptation to make changes that don't actually remove or change C symbols, but are clearly an ABI break, in the sense that an application that previously worked and was considered correct no longer works. A prominent recent example is the theming changes in GTK 3.20: the ABI in terms of functions available didn't change, but what happens when you call those functions changed in an incompatible way. This makes GTK hard to rely on for applications outside the GNOME release cycle, which is a problem that needs to be fixed (without stopping development from continuing). The goal of the plan we discussed today is to decouple the latest branch of development, which moves fast and sometimes breaks API, from the API-stable branches, which only get bug fixes. This model should look quite familiar to Debian contributors, because it's a lot like the way we release Debian and Ubuntu. In Debian, at any given time we have a development branch (testing/unstable) - currently "stretch", the future Debian 9. We also have some stable branches, of which the most recent are Debian 8 "jessie" and Debian 7 "wheezy". Different users of Debian have different trade-offs that lead them to choose one or the other of these. Users who value stability and want to avoid unexpected changes, even at a cost in terms of features and fixes for non-critical bugs, choose to use a stable release, preferably the most recent; they only need to change what they run on top of Debian for OS API changes (for instance webapps, local scripts, or the way they interact with the GUI) approximately every 2 years, or perhaps less often than that with the Debian-LTS project supporting non-current stable releases. Meanwhile, users who value the latest versions and are willing to work with a "moving target" as a result choose to use testing/unstable. The GTK analogy here is really quite close. In the new versioning model, library users who value stability over new things would prefer to use a stable-branch, ideally the latest; library users who want the latest features, the latest bug-fixes and the latest new bugs would use the branch that's the current focus of development. In practice we expect that the latter would be mostly GNOME projects. There's been some discussion at the hackfest about how often we'd have a new stable-branch: the fastest rate that's been considered is a stable-branch every 2 years, similar to Ubuntu LTS and Debian, but there's no consensus yet on whether they will be that frequent in practice. How many stable versions of GTK would end up shipped in Debian depends on how rapidly projects move from "old-stable" to "new-stable" upstream, how much those projects' Debian maintainers are willing to patch them to move between branches, and how many versions the release team will tolerate. Once we reach a steady state, I'd hope that we might have 1 or 2 stable-branched versions active at a time, packaged as separate parallel-installable source packages (a lot like how we handle Qt). GTK 2 might well stay around as an additional active version just from historical inertia. The stable versions are intended to be fully parallel-installable, just like the situation with GTK 1.2, GTK 2 and GTK 3 or with the major versions of Qt. For the "current development" version, I'd anticipate that we'd probably only ship one source package, and do ABI transitions for one version active at a time, a lot like how we deal with libgnome-desktop and the evolution-data-server family of libraries. Those versions would have parallel-installable runtime libraries but non-parallel-installable development files, again similar to libgnome-desktop. At the risk of stretching the Debian/Ubuntu analogy too far, the intermediate "current development" GTK releases that would accompany a GNOME release are like Ubuntu's non-LTS suites: they're more up to date than the fully stable releases (Ubuntu LTS, which has a release schedule similar to Debian stable), but less stable and not supported for as long. Hopefully this plan can meet both of its goals: minimize breakage for applications, while not holding back the development of new APIs.

5 June 2016

Simon McVittie: Flatpak in Debian

Quite a lot has happened in xdg-app since last time I blogged about it. Most noticeably, it isn't called xdg-app any more, having been renamed to Flatpak. It is now available in Debian experimental under that name, and the xdg-app package that was briefly there has been removed. I'm currently in the process of updating Flatpak to the latest version 0.6.4. The privileged part has also spun off into a separate project, Bubblewrap, which recently had its first release (0.1.0). This is intended as a common component with which unprivileged users can start a container in a way that won't let them escalate privileges, like a more flexible version of linux-user-chroot. Bubblewrap has also been made available in Debian, maintained by Laszlo Boszormenyi (also maintainer of linux-user-chroot). Yesterday I sent a patch to update Laszlo's packaging for 0.1.0. I'm hoping to become a co-maintainer to upload that myself, since I suspect Flatpak and Bubblewrap might need to track each other quite closely. For the moment, Flatpak still uses its own internal copy of Bubblewrap, but I consider that to be a bug and I'd like to be able to fix it soon. At some point I also want to experiment with using Bubblewrap to sandbox some of the game engines that are packaged in Debian: networked games are a large attack surface, and typically consist of the sort of speed-optimized C or C++ code that is an ideal home for security vulnerabilities. I've already made some progress on jailing game engines with AppArmor, but making sensitive files completely invisible to the game engine seems even better than preventing them from being opened. Next weekend I'm going to be heading to Toronto for the GTK Hackfest, primarily to to talk to GNOME and Flatpak developers about their plans for sandboxing, portals and Flatpak. Hopefully we can make some good progress there: the more I know about the state of software security, the less happy I am with random applications all being equally privileged. Newer display technologies like Wayland and Mir represent an opportunity to plug one of the largest holes in typical application containerization, which is a major step in bringing sandboxes like Flatpak and Snap from proof-of-concept to a practical improvement in security. Other next steps for Flatpak in Debian:

30 January 2016

Simon McVittie: GNOME Developer Experience hackfest: xdg-app + Debian

Over the last few days I've been at the GNOME Developer Experience hackfest in Brussels, looking into xdg-app and how best to use it in Debian and Debian derivatives. xdg-app is basically a way to run "non-core" software on Linux distributions, analogous to apps on Android and iOS. It doesn't replace distributions like Debian or packaging systems, but it adds a layer above them. It's mostly aimed towards third-party apps obtained from somewhere that isn't your distribution vendor, aiming to address a few long-standing problems in that space: To address the first point, each application uses a specified "runtime", which is available as /usr inside its sandbox. This can be used to run application bundles with multiple, potentially incompatible sets of dependencies within the same desktop environment. A runtime can be updated within its branch - for instance, if an application uses the "GNOME 3.18" runtime (consisting of a basic Linux system, the GNOME 3.18 libraries, other related libraries like Mesa, and their recursive dependencies like libjpeg), it can expect to see minor-version updates from GNOME 3.18.x (including any security updates that might be necessary for the bundled libraries), but not a jump to GNOME 3.20. To address the second issue, the plan is for application bundles to be available as a single file, containing metadata (such as the runtime to use), the app itself, and any dependencies that are not available in the runtime (which the app vendor is responsible for updating if necessary). However, the primary way to distribute and upgrade runtimes and applications is to package them as OSTree repositories, which provide a git-like content-addressed filesystem, with efficient updates using binary deltas. The resulting files are hard-linked into place. To address the last point, application bundles run partially isolated from the wider system, using containerization techniques such as namespaces to prevent direct access to system resources. Resources from outside the sandbox can be accessed via "portal" services, which are responsible for access control; for example, the Documents portal (the only one, so far) displays an "Open" dialog outside the sandbox, then allows the application to access only the selected file. xdg-app for Debian One thing I've been doing at this hackfest is improving the existing Debian/Ubuntu packaging for xdg-app (and its dependencies ostree and libgsystem), aiming to get it into a state where I can upload it to Debian experimental. Because xdg-app aims to be a general freedesktop project, I'm currently intending to make it part of the "Utopia" packaging team alongside projects like D-Bus and polkit, but I'm open to suggestions if people want to co-maintain it elsewhere. In the process of updating xdg-app, I sent various patches to Alex, mostly fixing build and test issues, which are in the new 0.4.8 release. I'd appreciate co-maintainers and further testing for this stuff, particularly ostree: ostree is primarily a whole-OS deployment technology, which isn't a use-case that I've tested, and in particular ostree-grub2 probably doesn't work yet. Source code: Binaries (no trust path, so only use these if you have a test VM): The "Hello, World" of xdg-apps Another thing I set out to do here was to make a runtime and an app out of Debian packages. Most of the test applications in and around GNOME use the "freedesktop" or "GNOME" runtimes, which consist of a Yocto base system and lots of RPMs, are rebuilt from first principles on-demand, and are extensive and capable enough that they make it somewhat non-obvious what's in an app or a runtime. So, here's a step-by-step route through xdg-app, first using typical GNOME instructions, but then using the simplest GUI app I could find - xvt, a small xterm clone. I'm using a Debian testing (stretch) x86_64 virtual machine for all this. xdg-app currently requires systemd-logind to put users and apps in cgroups, either with systemd as pid 1 (systemd-sysv) or systemd-shim and cgmanager; I used the default systemd-sysv. In principle it could work with plain cgmanager, but nobody has contributed that support yet. Demonstrating an existing xdg-app Debian's kernel is currently patched to be able to allow unprivileged users to create user namespaces, but make it runtime-configurable, because there have been various security issues in that feature, making it a security risk for a typical machine (and particularly a server). Hopefully unprivileged user namespaces will soon be secure enough that we can enable them by default, but for now, we have to do one of three things to let xdg-app use them: First, we'll need a runtime. The standard xdg-app tutorial would tell you to download the "GNOME Platform" version 3.18. To do that, you'd add a remote, which is a bit like a git remote, and a bit like an apt repository:
$ wget http://sdk.gnome.org/keys/gnome-sdk.gpg
$ xdg-app remote-add --user --gpg-import=gnome-sdk.gpg gnome \
    http://sdk.gnome.org/repo/
(I'm ignoring considerations like trust paths and security here, for brevity; in real life, you'd want to obtain the signing key via https and/or have a trust path to it, just like you would for a secure-apt signing key.) You can list what's available in a remote:
$ xdg-app remote-ls --user gnome
...
org.freedesktop.Platform
...
org.freedesktop.Platform.Locale.cy
...
org.freedesktop.Sdk
...
org.gnome.Platform
...
The Platform runtimes are what we want here: they are collections of runtime libraries with which you can run an application. The Sdk runtimes add development tools, header files, etc. to be able to compile apps that will be compatible with the Platform. For now, all we want is the GNOME 3.18 platform:
$ xdg-app install --user gnome org.gnome.Platform 3.18
Next, we can install an app that uses it, from Alex Larsson's nightly builds of a subset of GNOME. The server they're on doesn't have a great deal of bandwidth, so be nice :-)
$ wget http://209.132.179.2/keys/nightly.gpg
$ xdg-app remote-add --user --gpg-import=nightly.gpg nightly \
    http://209.132.179.2/repo/
$ xdg-app install --user nightly org.mypaint.MypaintDevel
We now have one app, and the runtime it needs:
$ xdg-app list
org.mypaint.MypaintDevel
$ xdg-app run org.mypaint.MypaintDevel
[you see a GUI window]
Digression: what's in a runtime? Behind the scenes, xdg-app runtimes and apps are both OSTree trees. This means the ostree tool, from the package of the same name, can be used to inspect them.
$ sudo apt install ostree
$ ostree refs --repo ~/.local/share/xdg-app/repo
gnome:runtime/org.gnome.Platform/x86_64/3.18
nightly:app/org.mypaint.MypaintDevel/x86_64/master
A "ref" has roughly the same meaning as in git: something like a branch or a tag. ostree can list the directory tree that it represents:
$ ostree ls --repo ~/.local/share/xdg-app/repo \
    runtime/org.gnome.Platform/x86_64/3.18
d00755 0 0      0 /
-00644 0 0    493 /metadata
d00755 0 0      0 /files
$ ostree ls --repo ~/.local/share/xdg-app/repo \
    runtime/org.gnome.Platform/x86_64/3.18 /files
d00755 0 0      0 /files
l00777 0 0      0 /files/local -> ../var/usrlocal
l00777 0 0      0 /files/sbin -> bin
d00755 0 0      0 /files/bin
d00755 0 0      0 /files/cache
d00755 0 0      0 /files/etc
d00755 0 0      0 /files/games
d00755 0 0      0 /files/include
d00755 0 0      0 /files/lib
d00755 0 0      0 /files/lib64
d00755 0 0      0 /files/libexec
d00755 0 0      0 /files/share
d00755 0 0      0 /files/src
You can see that /files in a runtime is basically a copy of /usr. This is not coincidental: the runtime's /files gets mounted at /usr inside the xdg-app container. There is also some metadata, which is in the ini-like syntax seen in .desktop files:
$ ostree cat --repo ~/.local/share/xdg-app/repo \
    runtime/org.gnome.Platform/x86_64/3.18 /metadata
[Runtime]
name=org.gnome.Platform/x86_64/3.16
runtime=org.gnome.Platform/x86_64/3.16
sdk=org.gnome.Sdk/x86_64/3.16
[Extension org.freedesktop.Platform.GL]
version=1.2
directory=lib/GL
[Extension org.freedesktop.Platform.Timezones]
version=1.2
directory=share/zoneinfo
[Extension org.gnome.Platform.Locale]
directory=share/runtime/locale
subdirectories=true
[Environment]
GI_TYPELIB_PATH=/app/lib/girepository-1.0
GST_PLUGIN_PATH=/app/lib/gstreamer-1.0
LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/app/lib:/usr/lib/GL
Looking at an app, the situation is fairly similar:
$ ostree ls --repo ~/.local/share/xdg-app/repo \
    app/org.mypaint.MypaintDevel/x86_64/master
d00755 0 0      0 /
-00644 0 0    258 /metadata
d00755 0 0      0 /export
d00755 0 0      0 /files
This time, /files maps to what will become /app for the application, which was compiled with --prefix=/app:
$ ostree ls --repo ~/.local/share/xdg-app/repo \
    app/org.mypaint.MypaintDevel/x86_64/master /files
d00755 0 0      0 /files
-00644 0 0   4599 /files/manifest.json
d00755 0 0      0 /files/bin
d00755 0 0      0 /files/lib
d00755 0 0      0 /files/share
There is also a /export directory, which is made visible to the host system so that the contained app can appear as a "first-class citizen" in menus:
$ ostree ls --repo ~/.local/share/xdg-app/repo \
    app/org.mypaint.MypaintDevel/x86_64/master /export
d00755 0 0      0 /export
d00755 0 0      0 /export/share
user@debian:~$ ostree ls --repo ~/.local/share/xdg-app/repo \
    app/org.mypaint.MypaintDevel/x86_64/master /export/share
d00755 0 0      0 /export/share
d00755 0 0      0 /export/share/app-info
d00755 0 0      0 /export/share/applications
d00755 0 0      0 /export/share/icons
user@debian:~$ ostree ls --repo ~/.local/share/xdg-app/repo \
    app/org.mypaint.MypaintDevel/x86_64/master /export/share/applications
d00755 0 0      0 /export/share/applications
-00644 0 0    715 /export/share/applications/org.mypaint.MypaintDevel.desktop
$ ostree cat --repo ~/.local/share/xdg-app/repo \
    app/org.mypaint.MypaintDevel/x86_64/master \
    /export/share/applications/org.mypaint.MypaintDevel.desktop
[Desktop Entry]
Version=1.0
Name=(Nightly) MyPaint
TryExec=mypaint
Exec=mypaint %f
Comment=Painting program for digital artists
...
Comment[zh_HK]= 
GenericName=Raster Graphics Editor
GenericName[fr]= diteur d'Image Matricielle
MimeType=image/openraster;image/png;image/jpeg;
Type=Application
Icon=org.mypaint.MypaintDevel
StartupNotify=true
Categories=Graphics;GTK;2DGraphics;RasterGraphics;
Terminal=false
Again, there's some metadata:
$ ostree cat --repo ~/.local/share/xdg-app/repo \
    app/org.mypaint.MypaintDevel/x86_64/master /metadata
[Application]
name=org.mypaint.MypaintDevel
runtime=org.gnome.Platform/x86_64/3.18
sdk=org.gnome.Sdk/x86_64/3.18
command=mypaint
[Context]
shared=ipc;
sockets=x11;pulseaudio;
filesystems=host;
[Extension org.mypaint.MypaintDevel.Debug]
directory=lib/debug
Building a runtime, probably the wrong way The way in which the reference/demo runtimes and containers are generated is... involved. As far as I can tell, there's a base OS built using Yocto, and the actual GNOME bits come from RPMs. However, we don't need to go that far to get a working runtime. In preparing this runtime I'm probably completely ignoring some best-practices and tools - but it works, so it's good enough. First we'll need a repository:
$ sudo install -d -o$(id -nu) /srv/xdg-apps
$ ostree init --repo /srv/xdg-apps
I'm just keeping this local for this demonstration, but you could rsync it to a web server's exported directory or something - a lot like a git repository, it's just a collection of files. We want everything in /usr because that's what xdg-app expects, hence usrmerge:
$ sudo mount -t tmpfs -o mode=0755 tmpfs /mnt
$ sudo debootstrap --arch=amd64 --include=libx11-6,usrmerge \
    --variant=minbase stretch /mnt http://192.168.122.1:3142/debian
$ sudo mkdir /mnt/runtime
$ sudo mv /mnt/usr /mnt/runtime/files
This obviously has a lot of stuff in it that we don't need - most obviously init, apt and dpkg - but it's Good Enough . We will also need some metadata. This is sufficient:
$ sudo sh -c 'cat > /mnt/runtime/metadata'
[Runtime]
name=org.debian.Debootstrap/x86_64/8.20160130
runtime=org.debian.Debootstrap/x86_64/8.20160130
That's a runtime. We can commit it to ostree, and generate xdg-app metadata:
$ ostree commit --repo /srv/xdg-apps \
    --branch runtime/org.debian.Debootstrap/x86_64/8.20160130 \
    /mnt/runtime
$ fakeroot ostree commit --repo /srv/xdg-apps \
    --branch runtime/org.debian.Debootstrap/x86_64/8.20160130
$ fakeroot xdg-app build-update-repo /srv/xdg-apps
(I'm not sure why ostree and xdg-app report "Operation not permitted" when we aren't root or fakeroot - feedback welcome.) build-update-repo would presumably also be the right place to GPG-sign your repository, if you were doing that. We can add that as another xdg-app remote:
$ xdg-app remote-add --user --no-gpg-verify local file:///srv/xdg-apps
$ xdg-app remote-ls --user local
org.debian.Debootstrap
Building an app, probably the wrong way The right way to build an app is to build a "SDK" runtime - similar to that platform runtime, but with development files and tools - and recompile the app and any missing libraries with ./configure --prefix=/app && make && make install. I'm not going to do that, because simplicity is nice, and I'm reasonably sure xvt doesn't actually hard-code /usr into the binary:
$ install -d xvt-app/files/bin
$ sudo apt-get --download-only install xvt
$ dpkg-deb --fsys-tarfile /var/cache/apt/archives/xvt_2.1-20.1_amd64.deb \
      tar -xvf - ./usr/bin/xvt
./usr/
./usr/bin/
./usr/bin/xvt
...
$ mv usr xvt-app/files
Again, we'll need metadata, and it's much simpler than the more production-quality GNOME nightly builds:
$ cat > xvt-app/metadata
[Application]
name=org.debian.packages.xvt
runtime=org.debian.Debootstrap/x86_64/8.20160130
command=xvt
[Context]
sockets=x11;
$ fakeroot ostree commit --repo /srv/xdg-apps \
    --branch app/org.debian.packages.xvt/x86_64/2.1-20.1 xvt-app
$ fakeroot xdg-app build-update-repo /srv/xdg-apps
Updating appstream branch
No appstream data for runtime/org.debian.Debootstrap/x86_64/8.20160130
No appstream data for app/org.debian.packages.xvt/x86_64/2.1-20.1
Updating summary
$ xdg-app remote-ls --user local
org.debian.Debootstrap
org.debian.packages.xvt
The obligatory screenshot OK, good, now we can install it:
$ xdg-app install --user local org.debian.Debootstrap 8.20160130
$ xdg-app install --user local org.debian.packages.xvt 2.1-20.1
$ xdg-app run --branch=2.1-20.1 org.debian.packages.xvt
xvt in a container and you can play around with the shell in the xvt and see what you can and can't do in the container. I'm sure there were better ways to do most of this, but I think there's value in having such a simplistic demo to go alongside the various GNOMEish apps.
Acknowledgements: Thanks to all those!

15 November 2015

Simon McVittie: Discworld Noir in a Windows 98 virtual machine on Linux

Discworld Noir was a superb adventure game, but is also notoriously unreliable, even in Windows on real hardware; using Wine is just not going to work. After many attempts at bringing it back into working order, I've settled on an approach that seems to work: now that qemu and libvirt have made virtualization and emulation easy, I can run it in a version of Windows that was current at the time of its release. Unfortunately, Windows 98 doesn't virtualize particularly well either, so this still became a relatively extensive yak-shaving exercise. discworldnoir-boxes.jpg These instructions assume that /srv/virt is a suitable place to put disk images, but you can use anywhere you want. The emulated PC After some trial and error, it seems to work if I configure qemu to emulate the following: A modern laptop CPU is an order of magnitude faster than what Discworld Noir needs, so full emulation isn't a problem, despite being inefficient. There is deliberately no networking, because Discworld Noir doesn't need it, and a 17 year old operating system with no privilege separation is very much not safe to use on the modern Internet! Software needed Windows 98 installation It seems to be easiest to do this bit by running qemu-system-i386 manually:
qemu-img create -f qcow2 /srv/virt/discworldnoir.qcow2 30G
qemu-system-i386 -hda /srv/virt/discworldnoir.qcow2 \
    -drive media=cdrom,format=raw,file=/srv/virt/windows98.iso \
    -no-kvm -vga cirrus -m 256 -cpu pentium3 -localtime
Don't start the installation immediately. Instead, boot the installation CD to a DOS prompt with CD-ROM support. From here, run
fdisk
and create a single partition filling the emulated hard disk. When finished, hard-reboot the virtual machine (press Ctrl+C on the qemu-system-i386 process and run it again). The DOS FORMAT.COM utility is on the Windows CD-ROM but not in the root directory or the default %PATH%, so you'll have to run:
d:\win98\format c:
to create the FAT filesystem. You might have to reboot again at this point. The reason for doing this the hard way is that the Windows 98 installer doesn't detect qemu as supporting ACPI. You want ACPI support, so that Windows will issue IDLE instructions from its idle loop, instead of occupying a CPU core with a busy-loop. To get that, boot to a DOS prompt again, and use:
setup /p j /iv
/p j forces ACPI support (Thanks to "Richard S" on the Virtualbox forums for this tip.) /iv is unimportant, but it disables the annoying "billboards" during installation, which advertised once-exciting features like support for dial-up modems and JPEG wallpaper. I used a "Typical" installation; there didn't seem to be much point in tweaking the installed package set when everything is so small by modern standards. Windows 98 has built-in support for the Cirrus VGA card that we're emulating, so after a few reboots, it should be able to run in a semi-modern resolution and colour depth. Discworld Noir apparently prefers a 640 480 16-bit video mode, so right-click on the desktop background, choose Properties and set that up. Audio drivers This is the part that took me the longest to get working. Of the sound cards that qemu can emulate, Windows 98 only supports the SoundBlaster 16 out of the box. Unfortunately, the Soundblaster 16 emulation in qemu is incomplete, and in particular version 2.1 (as shipped in Debian 8) has a tendency to make Windows lock up during boot. I've seen advice in various places to emulate an Eqsonic ES1370 (SoundBlaster AWE 64), but that didn't work for me: one of the drivers I tried caused Windows to lock up at a black screen during boot, and the other didn't detect the emulated hardware. The next-oldest sound card that qemu can emulate is a Realtek AC97, which was often found integrated into motherboards in the late 1990s. This one seems to work, with the "A400" driver bundle linked above. For Windows 98 first edition, you need a driver bundle that includes the old "VXD" drivers, not just the "WDM" drivers supported by Second Edition and newer. The easiest way to get that into qemu seems to be to turn it into a CD image:
genisoimage -o /srv/virt/discworldnoir-drivers.iso WDM_A400.exe
qemu-system-i386 -hda /srv/virt/discworldnoir.qcow2 \
    -drive media=cdrom,format=raw,file=/srv/virt/windows98.iso \
    -drive media=cdrom,format=raw,file=/srv/virt/discworldnoir-drivers.iso \
    -no-kvm -vga cirrus -m 256 -cpu pentium3 -localtime -soundhw ac97
Run the installer from E:, then reboot with the Windows 98 CD inserted, and Windows should install the driver. Installing Discworld Noir Boot up the virtual machine with CD 1 in the emulated drive:
qemu-system-i386 -hda /srv/virt/discworldnoir.qcow2 \
    -drive media=cdrom,format=raw,file=/srv/virt/DWN_ENG_1.iso \
    -no-kvm -vga cirrus -m 256 -cpu pentium3 -localtime -soundhw ac97
You might be thinking "... why not insert all three CDs into D:, E: and F:?" but the installer expects subsequent disks to appear in the same drive where CD 1 was initially, so that won't work. Instead, when prompted for a new CD, switch to the qemu monitor with Ctrl+Alt+2 (note that this is 2, not F2). At the (qemu) prompt, use info block to see a list of emulated drives, then issue a command like
change ide0-cd1 /srv/virt/DWN_ENG_2.iso
to swap the CD. Then switch back to Windows' console with Ctrl+Alt+1 and continue installation. I used a Full installation of Discworld Noir. Transferring the virtual machine to GNOME Boxes Having finished the "control freak" phase of installation, I wanted a slightly more user-friendly way to run this game, so I transferred the virtual machine to be used by libvirtd, which is the backend for both GNOME Boxes and virt-manager:
virsh create discworldnoir.xml
Here is the configuration I used. It's a mixture of automatic configuration from virt-manager, and hand-edited configuration to make it match the qemu-system-i386 command-line. Running the game If all goes well, you should now see a discworldnoir virtual machine in GNOME Boxes, in which you can boot Windows 98 and play the game. Have fun!

22 June 2015

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 8 in Stretch cycle

What happened about the reproducible builds effort this week: Toolchain fixes Andreas Henriksson has improved Johannes Schauer initial patch for pbuilder adding support for build profiles. Packages fixed The following 12 packages became reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: collabtive, eric, file-rc, form-history-control, freehep-chartableconverter-plugin , jenkins-winstone, junit, librelaxng-datatype-java, libwildmagic, lightbeam, puppet-lint, tabble. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues but not all of them: Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet: reproducible.debian.net Bugs with the ftbfs usertag are now visible on the bug graphs. This explain the recent spike. (h01ger) Andreas Beckmann suggested a way to test building packages using the funny paths that one can get when they contain the full Debian package version string. debbindiff development Lunar started an important refactoring introducing abstactions for containers and files in order to make file type identification more flexible, enabling fuzzy matching, and allowing parallel processing. Documentation update Ximin Luo detailed the proposal to standardize environment variables to pass a reference source date to tools that needs one (e.g. documentation generator). Package reviews 41 obsolete reviews have been removed, 168 added and 36 updated this week. Some more issues affecting packages failing to build from source have been identified. Meetings Minutes have been posted for Tuesday June 16th meeting. The next meeting is scheduled Tuesday June 23rd at 17:00 UTC. Presentations Lunar presented the project in French during Pas Sage en Seine in Paris. Video and slides are available.

15 June 2015

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 7 in Stretch cycle

What happened about the reproducible builds effort for this week: Presentations On June 7th, Reiner Herrmann presented the project at the Gulaschprogrammiernacht 15 in Karlsruhe, Germany. Video and audio recordings in German are available, and so are the slides in English. Toolchain fixes Daniel Kahn Gillmor's report on help2man started a discussion with Brendan O'Dea and Ximin Luo about standardizing a common environment variable that would provide a replacement for an embedded build date. After various proposals and research by Ximin about date handling in several programming languages, the best solution seems to define SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH with a value suitable for gmtime(3).
  1. Martin Borgert wondered if Sphinx could be changed in a way that would avoid having to tweak debian/rules in packages using it to produce HTML documentation.
Daniel Kahn Gillmor opened a new report about icont producing unreproducible binaries. Packages fixed The following 32 packages became reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: agda, alex, c2hs, clutter-1.0, colorediffs-extension, cpphs, darcs-monitor, dispmua, haskell-curl, haskell-glfw, haskell-glib, haskell-gluraw, haskell-glut, haskell-gnutls, haskell-gsasl, haskell-hfuse, haskell-hledger-interest, haskell-hslua, haskell-hsqml, haskell-hssyck, haskell-libxml-sax, haskell-openglraw, haskell-readline, haskell-terminfo, haskell-x11, jarjar-maven-plugin, kxml2, libcgi-struct-xs-perl, libobject-id-perl, maven-docck-plugin, parboiled, pegdown. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues but not all of them: Patches submitted which did not make their way to the archive yet: reproducible.debian.net A new variation to better notice when a package captures the environment has been introduced. (h01ger) The test on Debian packages works by building the package twice in a short time frame. But sometimes, a mirror push can happen between the first and the second build, resulting in a package built in a different build environment. This situation is now properly detected and will run a third build automatically. (h01ger) OpenWrt, the distribution specialized in embedded devices like small routers, is now being tested for reproducibility. The situation looks very good for their packages which seems mostly affected by timestamps in the tarball. System images will require more work on debbindiff to be better understood. (h01ger) debbindiff development Reiner Herrmann added support for decompling Java .class file and .ipk package files (used by OpenWrt). This is now available in version 22 released on 2015-06-14. Documentation update Stephen Kitt documented the new --insert-timestamp available since binutils-mingw-w64 version 6.2 available to insert a ready-made date in PE binaries built with mingw-w64. Package reviews 195 obsolete reviews have been removed, 65 added and 126 updated this week. New identified issues: Misc. Holger Levsen reported an issue with the locales-all package that Provides: locales but is actually missing some of the files provided by locales. Coreboot upstream has been quick to react after the announcement of the tests set up the week before. Patrick Georgi has fixed all issues in a couple of days and all Coreboot images are now reproducible (without a payload). SeaBIOS is one of the most frequently used payload on PC hardware and can now be made reproducible too. Paul Kocialkowski wrote to the mailing list asking for help on getting U-Boot tested for reproducibility. Lunar had a chat with maintainers of Open Build Service to better understand the difference between their system and what we are doing for Debian.

5 June 2015

Simon McVittie: Why polkit (or, how to mount a disk on modern Linux)

I've recently found myself explaining polkit (formerly PolicyKit) to one of Collabora's clients, and thought that blogging about the same topic might be useful for other people who are confused by it; so, here is why udisks2 and polkit are the way they are. As always, opinions in this blog are my own, not Collabora's. Privileged actions Broadly, there are two ways a process can do something: it can do it directly (i.e. ask the kernel directly), or it can use inter-process communication to ask a service to do that operation on its behalf. If it does it directly, the components that say whether it can succeed are the Linux kernel's normal permissions checks (DAC), and if configured, AppArmor, SELinux or a similar MAC layer. All very simple so far. Unfortunately, the kernel's relatively coarse-grained checks are not sufficient to express the sorts of policies that exist on a desktop/laptop/mobile system. My favourite example for this sort of thing is mounting filesystems. If I plug in a USB stick with a FAT filesystem, it's reasonable to expect my chosen user interface to either mount it automatically, or let me press a button to mount it. Similarly, to avoid data loss, I should be able to unmount it when I'm finished with it. However, mounting and unmounting a USB stick is fundamentally the same system call as mounting and unmounting any other filesystem - and if ordinary users can do arbitrary mount system calls, they can cause all sorts of chaos, for instance by mounting a filesystem that contains setuid executables (privilege escalation), or umounting a critical OS filesystem like /usr (denial of service). Something needs to arbitrate: you can mount filesystems, but only under certain conditions . The kernel developer motto for this sort of thing is mechanism, not policy : they are very keen to avoid encoding particular environments' policies (the sort of thing you could think of as business rules ) in the kernel, because that makes it non-generic and hard to maintain. As a result, direct mount/unmount actions are only allowed by privileged processes, and it's up to user-space processes to arrange for a privileged process to make the desired mount syscall. Here are some other privileged actions which laptop/desktop users can reasonably expect to just work , with or without requiring a sysadmin-like (root-equivalent) user: In environments that use a MAC framework like AppArmor, actions that would normally be allowed can become privileged: for instance, in a framework for sandboxed applications, most apps shouldn't be allowed to record audio. This prevents carrying out these actions directly, again resulting in the only way to achieve them being to ask a service to carry out the action. Ask a system service to do it On to the next design, then: I can submit a request to a privileged process, which does some checks to make sure I'm not trying to break the system (or alternatively, that I have enough sysadmin rights that I'm allowed to break the system if I want to), and then does the privileged action for me. You might think I'm about to start discussing D-Bus and daemons, but actually, a prominent earlier implementation of this was mount(8), which is normally setuid root:
% ls -l /bin/mount
-rwsr-xr-x 1 root root 40000 May 22 11:37 /bin/mount
If you look at it from an odd angle, this is inter-process communication across a privilege boundary: I run the setuid executable, creating a process. Because the executable has the setuid bit set, the kernel makes the process highly privileged: its effective uid is root, and it has all the necessary capabilities to mount filesystems. I submit the request by passing it in the command-line arguments. mount does some checks - specifically, it looks in /etc/fstab to see whether the filesystem I'm trying to mount has the user or users flag - then carries out the mount system call. There are a few obvious problems with this: Ask a system service to do it, via D-Bus or other IPC To avoid the issues of setuid, we could use inter-process communication in the traditional sense: run a privileged daemon (on boot or on-demand), make it listen for requests, and use the IPC channel as our privilege boundary. udisks2 is one such privileged daemon, which uses D-Bus as its IPC channel. D-Bus is a commonly-used inter-process system; one of its intended/designed uses is to let user processes and system services communicate, especially this sort of communication between a privileged daemon and its less-privileged clients. People sometimes criticize D-Bus as not doing anything you couldn't do yourself with some AF_UNIX sockets. Well, no, of course it doesn't - the important bit of the reference implementation and the various interoperable reimplementations consists of a daemon and some AF_UNIX sockets, and the rest is a simple matter of programming. However, it's sufficient for most uses in its problem space, and is usually better than inventing your own. The advantage of D-Bus over doing your own thing is precisely that you are not doing your own thing: good IPC design is hard, and D-Bus makes some structural decisions so that fewer application authors have to think about them. For instance, it has a central hub daemon (the dbus-daemon, or message bus ) so that n communicating applications don't need O(n ) sockets; it uses the dbus-daemon to provide a total message ordering so you don't have to think about message reordering; it has a distributed naming model (which can also be used as a distributed mutex) so you don't have to design that; it has a serialization format and a type system so you don't have to design one of those; it has a framework for activating" run-on-demand daemons so they don't have to use resources initially, implemented using a setuid helper and/or systemd; and so on. If you have religious objections to D-Bus, you can mentally replace D-Bus with AF_UNIX or something and most of this article will still be true. Is this OK? In either case - exec'ing a privileged helper, or submitting a request to a privileged daemon via IPC - the privileged process has two questions that it needs to answer before it does its work: It needs to make some sort of decision on the latter based on the information available to it. However, before we even get there, there is another layer: In the setuid model, there is a simple security check that you can apply: you can make /bin/mount only executable by a particular group, or only executable by certain AppArmor profiles, or similar. That works up to a point, but cannot distinguish between physically-present and not-physically-present users, or other facts that might be interesting to your local security policy. Similarly, in the IPC model, you can make certain communication channels impossible, for instance by using dbus-daemon's ability to decide which messages to deliver, or AF_UNIX sockets' filesystem permissions, or a MAC framework like AppArmor. Both of these are quite coarse-grained checks which don't really understand the finer details of what is going on. If the answer to "is this safe? is something of the form maybe, it depends on... , then they can't do the right thing: they must either let it through and let the domain-specific privileged process do the check, or deny it and lose potentially useful functionality. For instance, in an AppArmor environment, some applications have absolutely no legitimate reason to talk to udisks2, so the AppArmor policy can just block it altogether. However, once again, this is a coarse-grained check: the kernel has mechanism, not policy, and it doesn't know what the service does or why. If the application does need to be able to talk to the service at all, then finer-grained access control (obeying some, but not all, requests) has to be the service's job. dbus-daemon does have the ability to match messages in a relatively fine-grained way, based on the object path, interface and member in the message, as well as the routing information that it uses itself (i.e. the source and destination). However, it is not clear that this makes a great deal of sense conceptually: these are facts about the mechanics of the IPC, not facts about the domain-specific request (because the mechanics of the IPC are all that dbus-daemon understands). For instance, taking the udisks2 example again, dbus-daemon can't distinguish between an attempt to adjust mount options for a USB stick (probably fine) and an attempt to adjust mount options for /usr (not good). To have a domain-specific security policy, we need a domain-specific component, for instance udisks2, to get involved. Unlike dbus-daemon, udisks2 knows that not all disks are equal, knows which categories make sense to distinguish, and can identify which categories a particular disk is in. So udisks2 can make a more informed decision. So, a naive approach might be to write a function in udisks2 that looks something like this pseudocode:
may_i_mount_this_disk (user, disk, mount options)   boolean
 
    if (user is root   user is root-equivalent)
        return true;
    if (disk is not removable)
       return false;
    if (mount options are scary)
       return false;
    if (user is in  manipulate non-local disks  group)
        return true;
    if (user is not logged-in locally)
       return false;
    # https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiseat_configuration
    if (user is not logged-in on the same seat where the disk is
            plugged in)
       return false;
    return true;
 
Delegating the security policy to something central The pseudocode security policy outlined above is reasonably complicated already, and doesn't necessarily cover everything that you might want to consider. Meanwhile, not every system is the same. A general-purpose Linux distribution like Debian might run on server/mainframe systems with only remote users, personal laptops/desktops with one root-equivalent user, locked-down corporate laptops/desktops, mobile devices and so on; these systems should not necessarily all have the same security policy. Another interesting factor is that for some privileged operations, you might want to carry out interactive authorization: ask the requesting user to confirm that the action (which might have come from a background process) should take place (like Windows' UAC), or to prove that the person currently at the keyboard is the same as the person who logged in by giving their password (like sudo). We could in principle write code for all of this in udisks2, and in NetworkManager, and in systemd, ... - but that clearly doesn't scale, particularly if you want the security policy to be configurable. Enter polkit (formerly PolicyKit), a system service for applying security policies to actions. The way polkit works is that the application does its domain-specific analysis of the request - in the case of udisks2, whether the device to be mounted is removable, whether the mount options are reasonable, etc. - and converts it into an action. The action gives polkit a way to distinguish between things that are conceptually different, without needing to know the specifics. For instance, udisks2 currently divides up filesystem-mounting into org.freedesktop.udisks2.filesystem-mount, org.freedesktop.udisks2.filesystem-mount-fstab, org.freedesktop.udisks2.filesystem-mount-system and org.freedesktop.udisks2.filesystem-mount-other-seat. The application also finds the identity of the user making the request. Next, the application sends the action, the identity of the requesting user, and any other interesting facts to polkit. As currently implemented, polkit is a D-Bus service, so this is an IPC request via D-Bus. polkit consults its database of policies in order to choose one of several results: So how does polkit decide this? The first thing is that it reads the machine-readable description of the actions, in /usr/share/polkit-1/actions, which specifies a default policy. Next, it evaluates a local security policy to see what that says. In the current version of polkit, the local security policy is configured by writing JavaScript in /etc/polkit-1/rules.d (local policy) and /usr/share/polkit-1/rules.d (OS-vendor defaults). In older versions such as the one currently shipped in Debian unstable, there was a plugin architecture; but in practice nobody wrote plugins for it, and instead everyone used the example local authority shipped with polkit, which was configured via files in /etc/polkit-1/localauthority and /etc/polkit-1/localauthority.d. These policies can take into account useful facts like: For instance, gnome-control-center on Debian installs this snippet:
polkit.addRule(function(action, subject)  
        if ((action.id == "org.freedesktop.locale1.set-locale"  
             action.id == "org.freedesktop.locale1.set-keyboard"  
             action.id == "org.freedesktop.hostname1.set-static-hostname"  
             action.id == "org.freedesktop.hostname1.set-hostname"  
             action.id == "org.gnome.controlcenter.datetime.configure") &&
            subject.local &&
            subject.active &&
            subject.isInGroup ("sudo"))  
                    return polkit.Result.YES;
             
 );
which is reasonably close to being pseudocode for active local users in the sudo group may set the system locale, keyboard layout, hostname and time, without needing to authenticate . A system administrator could of course override that by dropping a higher-priority policy for some or all of these actions into /etc/polkit-1/rules.d. Summary

17 May 2015

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 3 in Stretch cycle

What happened about the reproducible builds effort for this week: Toolchain fixes Tomasz Buchert submitted a patch to fix the currently overzealous package-contains-timestamped-gzip warning. Daniel Kahn Gillmor identified #588746 as a source of unreproducibility for packages using python-support. Packages fixed The following 57 packages became reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: antlr-maven-plugin, aspectj-maven-plugin, build-helper-maven-plugin, clirr-maven-plugin, clojure-maven-plugin, cobertura-maven-plugin, coinor-ipopt, disruptor, doxia-maven-plugin, exec-maven-plugin, gcc-arm-none-eabi, greekocr4gamera, haskell-swish, jarjar-maven-plugin, javacc-maven-plugin, jetty8, latexml, libcgi-application-perl, libnet-ssleay-perl, libtest-yaml-valid-perl, libwiki-toolkit-perl, libwww-csrf-perl, mate-menu, maven-antrun-extended-plugin, maven-antrun-plugin, maven-archiver, maven-bundle-plugin, maven-clean-plugin, maven-compiler-plugin, maven-ear-plugin, maven-install-plugin, maven-invoker-plugin, maven-jar-plugin, maven-javadoc-plugin, maven-processor-plugin, maven-project-info-reports-plugin, maven-replacer-plugin, maven-resources-plugin, maven-shade-plugin, maven-site-plugin, maven-source-plugin, maven-stapler-plugin, modello-maven-plugin1.4, modello-maven-plugin, munge-maven-plugin, ocaml-bitstring, ocr4gamera, plexus-maven-plugin, properties-maven-plugin, ruby-magic, ruby-mocha, sisu-maven-plugin, syncache, vdk2, wvstreams, xml-maven-plugin, xmlbeans-maven-plugin. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues but not all of them: Ben Hutchings also improved and merged several changes submitted by Lunar to linux. Currently untested because in contrib: reproducible.debian.net
Thanks to the reproducible-build team for running a buildd from hell. gregor herrmann
Mattia Rizzolo modified the script added last week to reschedule a package from Alioth, a reason can now be optionally specified. Holger Levsen splitted the package sets page so each set now has its own page. He also added new sets for Java packages, Haskell packages, Ruby packages, debian-installer packages, Go packages, and OCaml packages. Reiner Herrmann added locales-all to the set of packages installed in the build environment as its needed to properly identify variations due to the current locale. Holger Levsen improved the scheduling so new uploads get tested sooner. He also changed the .json output that is used by tracker.debian.org to lists FTBFS issues again but only for issues unrelated to the toolchain or our test setup. Amongst many other small fixes and additions, the graph colors should now be more friendly to red-colorblind people. The fix for pbuilder given in #677666 by Tim Landscheidt is now used. This fixed several FTBFS for OCaml packages. Work on rebuilding with different CPU has continued, a kvm-on-kvm build host has been set been set up for this purpose. debbindiff development Version 19 of debbindiff included a fix for a regression when handling info files. Version 20 fixes a bug when diffing files with many differences toward a last line with no newlines. It also now uses the proper encoding when writing the text output to a pipe, and detects info files better. Documentation update Thanks to Santiago Vila, the unneeded -depth option used with find when fixing mtimes has been removed from the examples. Package reviews 113 obsolete reviews have been removed this week while 77 has been added.

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