Search Results: "Richard Hartmann"

28 January 2017

Bits from Debian: Debian at FOSDEM 2017

On February 4th and 5th, Debian will be attending FOSDEM 2017 in Brussels, Belgium; a yearly gratis event (no registration needed) run by volunteers from the Open Source and Free Software community. It's free, and it's big: more than 600 speakers, over 600 events, in 29 rooms. This year more than 45 current or past Debian contributors will speak at FOSDEM: Alexandre Viau, Bradley M. Kuhn, Daniel Pocock, Guus Sliepen, Johan Van de Wauw, John Sullivan, Josh Triplett, Julien Danjou, Keith Packard, Martin Pitt, Peter Van Eynde, Richard Hartmann, Sebastian Dr ge, Stefano Zacchiroli and Wouter Verhelst, among others. Similar to previous years, the event will be hosted at Universit libre de Bruxelles. Debian contributors and enthusiasts will be taking shifts at the Debian stand with gadgets, T-Shirts and swag. You can find us at stand number 4 in building K, 1 B; CoreOS Linux and PostgreSQL will be our neighbours. See https://wiki.debian.org/DebianEvents/be/2017/FOSDEM for more details. We are looking forward to meeting you all!

03 January 2016

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 35 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the reproducible builds effort between December 20th to December 26th: Toolchain fixes Mattia Rizzolo rebased our experimental versions of debhelper (twice!) and dpkg on top of the latest releases. Reiner Herrmann submited a patch for mozilla-devscripts to sort the file list in generated preferences.js files. To be able to lift the restriction that packages must be built in the same path, translation support for the __FILE__ C pre-processor macro would also be required. Joerg Sonnenberger submitted a patch back in 2010 that would still be useful today. Chris Lamb started work on providing a deterministic mode for debootstrap. Packages fixed The following packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: bouncycastle, cairo-dock-plug-ins, darktable, gshare, libgpod, pafy, ruby-redis-namespace, ruby-rouge, sparkleshare. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet: reproducible.debian.net Statistics for package sets are now visible for the armhf architecture. (h01ger) The second build now has a longer timeout (18 hours) than the first build (12 hours). This should prevent wasting resources when a machine is loaded. (h01ger) Builds of Arch Linux packages are now done using a tmpfs. (h01ger) 200 GiB have been added to jenkins.debian.net (thanks to ProfitBricks!) to make room for new jobs. The current count is at 962 and growing! diffoscope development Aside from some minor bugs that have been fixed, a one-line change made huge memory (and time) savings as the output of transformation tool is now streamed line by line instead of loaded entirely in memory at once. disorderfs development Andrew Ayer released disorderfs version 0.4.2-1 on December 22th. It fixes a memory corruption error when processing command line arguments that could cause command line options to be ignored. Documentation update Many small improvements for the documentation on reproducible-builds.org sent by Georg Koppen were merged. Package reviews 666 (!) reviews have been removed, 189 added and 162 updated in the previous week. 151 new fail to build from source reports have been made by Chris West, Chris Lamb, Mattia Rizzolo, and Niko Tyni. New issues identified: unsorted_filelist_in_xul_ext_preferences, nondeterminstic_output_generated_by_moarvm. Misc. Steven Chamberlain drew our attention to one analysis of the Juniper ScreenOS Authentication Backdoor: Whilst this may have been added in source code, it was well-disguised in the disassembly and just 7 instructions long. I thought this was a good example of the current state-of-the-art, and why we'd like our binaries and eventually, installer and VM images reproducible IMHO. Joanna Rutkowska has mentioned possible ways for Qubes to become reproducible on their development mailing-list.

02 January 2016

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 33 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the reproducible builds effort between December 6th and December 12th: Toolchain fixes Reiner Herrmann rebased our experimental version of doxygen on version 1.8.9.1-6. Chris Lamb submitted a patch to make the manpages generated by ruby-ronn reproducible by using the locale-agnostic %Y-%m-%d for the dates. Daniel Kahn Gillmor took another shot at the issue of source path captured in DWARF symbols. A patch has been sent for review by GCC upstream to add the ability to read an environment variable with -fdebug-prefix-map. Packages fixed The following 24 packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: gkeyfile-sharp, gprbuild, graphmonkey, gthumb, haskell-yi-language, ion, jackson-databind, jackson-dataformat-smile, jackson-dataformat-xml, jnr-ffi, libcommons-net-java, libproxy, maven-shared-utils, monodevelop-database, mydumper, ndesk-dbus, nini, notify-sharp, pixz, protozero, python-rtslib-fb, slurm-llnl, taglib-sharp, tomboy-latex. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: These uploads might have fixed reproducibility issues but could not be tested yet: Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet: reproducible.debian.net Files created with diffoscope now have diffoscope in their name instead debbindiff. (h01ger) Hostnames of first and second build node are now recorded and shown in the build history. (Mattia Rizzolo) Exchanges have started with F-Droid developers to better understand what would be required to test F-Droid applications. (h01ger) A first small set of Fedora 23 packages is now also being tested while development on a new framework for testing RPMs in general has begun. A new Jenkins job has been added to set up to mock, the build system used by Fedora. Another new job takes care of testing RPMs from Fedora 23 on x86_64. So far only 151 packages from the buildsys-build group are tested (currently all unreproducible), but the plan is to build all 17,000 source packages in Fedora 23 and rawhide. The page presenting the results should also soon be improved. (h01ger, Dhiru Kholia) For Arch Linux, all 2223 packages from the extra repository will also be tested from now on. Packages in extra" are tested every four weeks, while those from core every week. Statistics are now displayed alongside the results. (h01ger) jenkins.debian.net has been updated to jenkins-job-builder version 1.3.0. Many job configurations have been simplified and refactored using features of the new version. This was another milestone for the jenkins.debian.org migration. (Phil Hands, h01ger) diffoscope development Chris Lamb announced try.diffoscope.org: an online service that runs diffoscope on user provided files. Screenshot of try.diffoscope.org Improvements are welcome. The application is licensed under the AGPLv3. On diffoscope itself, most pending patches have now been merged. Expect a release soon! Most of the code implementing parallel processing has been polished. Sadly, unpacking archive is CPU-bound in most cases, so the current thread-only implementation does not offer much gain on big packages. More work is still require to also add concurrent processes. Documentation update Ximin Luo has started to write a specification for buildinfo files that could become a larger platform than the limited set of features that were thought so far for Debian .buildinfo. Package reviews 113 reviews have been removed, 111 added and 56 updated in the previous week. 42 new FTBFS bugs were opened by Chris Lamb and Niko Tyni. New issues identified this week: timestamps_in_documentation_generated_by_docbook_dbtimestamp, timestamps_in_sym_l_files_generated_by_malaga, timestamps_in_edj_files_generated_by_edje_cc. Misc. Chris Lamb presented reproducible builds at skroutz.gr.

25 August 2015

Richard Hartmann: Tor-enabled Debian mirror, part 2

Well, that was quite some feedback to my last post; via blog, email, irc, and in person. I actually think this may be the most feedback I ever got to any single blog post. If you are still waiting for a reply after this new post, I will get back to you. To handle common question/information at once: So this whole thing is a lot easier now:
# apt-get install torsocks apt-transport-tor
# mv /etc/apt/sources.list /etc/apt/sources.list--backup2
# > /etc/apt/sources.list << EOF
deb tor+http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion/debian/ unstable main contrib non-free
deb tor+http://earthqfvaeuv5bla.onion/debian/ unstable main contrib non-free
EOF
# apt-get update
# apt-get install vcsh

Richard Hartmann: Tor-enabled Debian mirror

During Jacob Applebaum's talk at DebConf15, he noted that Debian should TLS-enable all services, especially the mirrors. His reasoning was that when a high-value target downloads a security update for package foo, an adversary knows that they are still using a vulnerable version of foo and try to attack before the security update has been installed. In this specific case, TLS is not of much use though. If the target downloads 4.7 MiB right after a security update with 4.7 MiB has been released, or downloads from security.debian.org, it's still obvious what's happening. Even padding won't help much as the 5 MiB download will also be suspicious. The mere act of downloading anything from the mirrors after an update has been released is reason enough to try an attack. The solution, is, of course, Tor. weasel was nice enough to set up a hidden service on Debian's infrastructure; initally we agreed that he would just give me a VM and I would do the actual work, but he went the full way on his own. Thanks :) This service is not redundant, it uses a key which is stored on the local drive, the .onion will change, and things are expected to break. But at least this service exists now and can be used, tested, and put under some load:
http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion/

I couldn't get apt-get to be content with a .onion in /etc/apt/sources.list and Acquire::socks::proxy "socks://127.0.0.1:9050"; in /etc/apt/apt.conf, but the torify wrapper worked like a charm. What follows is, to the best of my knowledge, the first ever download from Debian's "official" Tor-enabled mirror:
~ # apt-get install torsocks
~ # mv /etc/apt/sources.list /etc/apt/sources.list.backup
~ # echo 'deb http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion/debian/ unstable main non-free contrib' > /etc/apt/sources.list
~ # torify apt-get update
Get:1 http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion unstable InRelease [215 kB]
Get:2 http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion unstable/main amd64 Packages [7548 kB]
Get:3 http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion unstable/non-free amd64 Packages [91.9 kB]
Get:4 http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion unstable/contrib amd64 Packages [58.5 kB]
Get:5 http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion unstable/main i386 Packages [7541 kB]
Get:6 http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion unstable/non-free i386 Packages [85.4 kB]
Get:7 http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion unstable/contrib i386 Packages [58.1 kB]
Get:8 http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion unstable/contrib Translation-en [45.7 kB]
Get:9 http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion unstable/main Translation-en [5060 kB]
Get:10 http://vwakviie2ienjx6t.onion unstable/non-free Translation-en [80.8 kB]
Fetched 20.8 MB in 2min 0s (172 kB/s)
Reading package lists... Done
~ # torify apt-get install vim
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree       
Reading state information... Done
The following extra packages will be installed:
  vim-common vim-nox vim-runtime vim-tiny
Suggested packages:
  ctags vim-doc vim-scripts cscope indent
The following packages will be upgraded:
  vim vim-common vim-nox vim-runtime vim-tiny
5 upgraded, 0 newly installed, 0 to remove and 661 not upgraded.
Need to get 0 B/7719 kB of archives.
After this operation, 2048 B disk space will be freed.
Do you want to continue? [Y/n] 
Retrieving bug reports... Done
Parsing Found/Fixed information... Done
Reading changelogs... Done
(Reading database ... 316427 files and directories currently installed.)
Preparing to unpack .../vim-nox_2%3a7.4.826-1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking vim-nox (2:7.4.826-1) over (2:7.4.712-3) ...
Preparing to unpack .../vim_2%3a7.4.826-1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking vim (2:7.4.826-1) over (2:7.4.712-3) ...
Preparing to unpack .../vim-tiny_2%3a7.4.826-1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking vim-tiny (2:7.4.826-1) over (2:7.4.712-3) ...
Preparing to unpack .../vim-runtime_2%3a7.4.826-1_all.deb ...
Unpacking vim-runtime (2:7.4.826-1) over (2:7.4.712-3) ...
Preparing to unpack .../vim-common_2%3a7.4.826-1_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking vim-common (2:7.4.826-1) over (2:7.4.712-3) ...
Processing triggers for man-db (2.7.0.2-5) ...
Processing triggers for mime-support (3.58) ...
Processing triggers for desktop-file-utils (0.22-1) ...
Processing triggers for hicolor-icon-theme (0.13-1) ...
Setting up vim-common (2:7.4.826-1) ...
Setting up vim-runtime (2:7.4.826-1) ...
Processing /usr/share/vim/addons/doc
Setting up vim-nox (2:7.4.826-1) ...
Setting up vim (2:7.4.826-1) ...
Setting up vim-tiny (2:7.4.826-1) ...
~ # 

More services will follow. noodles, weasel, and me agreed that the project as a whole should aim to Tor-enable the complete package lifecycle, package information, and the website. Maybe a more secure install option on the official images which, amongst others, sets up apt, apt-listbugs, dput, reportbug, et al up to use Tor without further configuration could even be a realistic stretch goal.

24 August 2015

Richard Hartmann: DebConf15

Even though the week of DebCamp took its toll and the stress level will not go down any time soon... ...DebConf15 has finally started! :)

12 June 2015

Richard Hartmann: Happy Friday!!

So, what do you do before you break the Internet? You tweet this:

29 May 2015

Richard Hartmann: Do what I want

Sesse just gave me the most useful piece of information of this week: To zoom in/out in Android, you double tap and then drag your finger. All of a sudden, you can use Google Maps in one-handed operation again! A quick search turned up this gem: Touch mechanics on Android. Neat.

28 May 2015

Richard Hartmann: On SourceForge

You either die a hero or you live long enough to see yourself become the villain. And yes, we all know that that SF decided to wrap crapware around Windows installers ages ago and then made it opt-in after the backlash. Doing so for stale accounts makes sense from their PoV, which makes it all the worse. And no, I don't know how stale that account actually was, but that's irrelevant in this context either way.

24 April 2015

Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 17

At the current rate, Jessie should release... tomorrow! :) The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs: How do we compare to the Squeeze and Wheezy release cycles?
Week Squeeze Wheezy Jessie
43 284 (213+71) 468 (332+136) 319 (240+79)
44 261 (201+60) 408 (265+143) 274 (224+50)
45 261 (205+56) 425 (291+134) 295 (229+66)
46 271 (200+71) 401 (258+143) 427 (313+114)
47 283 (209+74) 366 (221+145) 342 (260+82)
48 256 (177+79) 378 (230+148) 274 (189+85)
49 256 (180+76) 360 (216+155) 226 (147+79)
50 204 (148+56) 339 (195+144) ???
51 178 (124+54) 323 (190+133) 189 (134+55)
52 115 (78+37) 289 (190+99) 147 (112+35)
1 93 (60+33) 287 (171+116) 140 (104+36)
2 82 (46+36) 271 (162+109) 157 (124+33)
3 25 (15+10) 249 (165+84) 172 (128+44)
4 14 (8+6) 244 (176+68) 187 (132+55)
5 2 (0+2) 224 (132+92) 175 (124+51)
6 release! 212 (129+83) 161 (109+52)
7 release+1 194 (128+66) 147 (106+41)
8 release+2 206 (144+62) 147 (96+51)
9 release+3 174 (105+69) 152 (101+51)
10 release+4 120 (72+48) 112 (82+30)
11 release+5 115 (74+41) 97 (68+29)
12 release+6 93 (47+46) 87 (71+16)
13 release+7 50 (24+26) 97 (77+20)
14 release+8 51 (32+19) ???
15 release+9 39 (32+7) 82 (49+17)
16 release+10 20 (12+8) 53 (49+4)
17 release+11 24 (19+5) 66 (57+9)
18 release+12 2 (2+0)
Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

19 April 2015

Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 16

The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs: How do we compare to the Squeeze and Wheezy release cycles?
Week Squeeze Wheezy Jessie
43 284 (213+71) 468 (332+136) 319 (240+79)
44 261 (201+60) 408 (265+143) 274 (224+50)
45 261 (205+56) 425 (291+134) 295 (229+66)
46 271 (200+71) 401 (258+143) 427 (313+114)
47 283 (209+74) 366 (221+145) 342 (260+82)
48 256 (177+79) 378 (230+148) 274 (189+85)
49 256 (180+76) 360 (216+155) 226 (147+79)
50 204 (148+56) 339 (195+144) ???
51 178 (124+54) 323 (190+133) 189 (134+55)
52 115 (78+37) 289 (190+99) 147 (112+35)
1 93 (60+33) 287 (171+116) 140 (104+36)
2 82 (46+36) 271 (162+109) 157 (124+33)
3 25 (15+10) 249 (165+84) 172 (128+44)
4 14 (8+6) 244 (176+68) 187 (132+55)
5 2 (0+2) 224 (132+92) 175 (124+51)
6 release! 212 (129+83) 161 (109+52)
7 release+1 194 (128+66) 147 (106+41)
8 release+2 206 (144+62) 147 (96+51)
9 release+3 174 (105+69) 152 (101+51)
10 release+4 120 (72+48) 112 (82+30)
11 release+5 115 (74+41) 97 (68+29)
12 release+6 93 (47+46)
13 release+7 50 (24+26)
14 release+8 51 (32+19)
15 release+9 39 (32+7)
16 release+10 20 (12+8)
17 release+11 24 (19+5)
18 release+12 2 (2+0)
Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

10 April 2015

Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 15

Still on the road with shittynet; sorry for missing last week. The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs: How do we compare to the Squeeze and Wheezy release cycles?
Week Squeeze Wheezy Jessie
43 284 (213+71) 468 (332+136) 319 (240+79)
44 261 (201+60) 408 (265+143) 274 (224+50)
45 261 (205+56) 425 (291+134) 295 (229+66)
46 271 (200+71) 401 (258+143) 427 (313+114)
47 283 (209+74) 366 (221+145) 342 (260+82)
48 256 (177+79) 378 (230+148) 274 (189+85)
49 256 (180+76) 360 (216+155) 226 (147+79)
50 204 (148+56) 339 (195+144) ???
51 178 (124+54) 323 (190+133) 189 (134+55)
52 115 (78+37) 289 (190+99) 147 (112+35)
1 93 (60+33) 287 (171+116) 140 (104+36)
2 82 (46+36) 271 (162+109) 157 (124+33)
3 25 (15+10) 249 (165+84) 172 (128+44)
4 14 (8+6) 244 (176+68) 187 (132+55)
5 2 (0+2) 224 (132+92) 175 (124+51)
6 release! 212 (129+83) 161 (109+52)
7 release+1 194 (128+66) 147 (106+41)
8 release+2 206 (144+62) 147 (96+51)
9 release+3 174 (105+69) 152 (101+51)
10 release+4 120 (72+48) 112 (82+30)
11 release+5 115 (74+41) 97 (68+29)
12 release+6 93 (47+46)
13 release+7 50 (24+26)
14 release+8 51 (32+19)
15 release+9 39 (32+7)
16 release+10 20 (12+8)
17 release+11 24 (19+5)
18 release+12 2 (2+0)
Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

27 March 2015

Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 13

The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs: How do we compare to the Squeeze and Wheezy release cycles?
Week Squeeze Wheezy Jessie
43 284 (213+71) 468 (332+136) 319 (240+79)
44 261 (201+60) 408 (265+143) 274 (224+50)
45 261 (205+56) 425 (291+134) 295 (229+66)
46 271 (200+71) 401 (258+143) 427 (313+114)
47 283 (209+74) 366 (221+145) 342 (260+82)
48 256 (177+79) 378 (230+148) 274 (189+85)
49 256 (180+76) 360 (216+155) 226 (147+79)
50 204 (148+56) 339 (195+144) ???
51 178 (124+54) 323 (190+133) 189 (134+55)
52 115 (78+37) 289 (190+99) 147 (112+35)
1 93 (60+33) 287 (171+116) 140 (104+36)
2 82 (46+36) 271 (162+109) 157 (124+33)
3 25 (15+10) 249 (165+84) 172 (128+44)
4 14 (8+6) 244 (176+68) 187 (132+55)
5 2 (0+2) 224 (132+92) 175 (124+51)
6 release! 212 (129+83) 161 (109+52)
7 release+1 194 (128+66) 147 (106+41)
8 release+2 206 (144+62) 147 (96+51)
9 release+3 174 (105+69) 152 (101+51)
10 release+4 120 (72+48) 112 (82+30)
11 release+5 115 (74+41) 97 (68+29)
12 release+6 93 (47+46) 87 (71+16)
13 release+7 50 (24+26) 97 (77+20)
14 release+8 51 (32+19)
15 release+9 39 (32+7)
16 release+10 20 (12+8)
17 release+11 24 (19+5)
18 release+12 2 (2+0)
Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

25 March 2015

Richard Hartmann: Visiting Hongkong and Shenzhen

TSDgeos had a good idea: Lazyweb travel recommodations. So, dear lazyweb: What are things to do or to avoid in Hongkong and Shenzhen if you have one and a half week of holiday before and after work duties? Any hidden gems to look at? What electronic markets are good? Should I take a boat trip around the waters of Hongkong? If you have any decent yet affordable sleeping options for 2-3 nights in Hongkong, that would also be interesting as my "proper" hotel stay does not start immediately. Not much in ways of comfort is needed as long as I have a safe place to lock my belongings. In somewhat related news, this Friday's bug report stats may be early or late as I will be on a plane towards China on Friday.

20 March 2015

Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 12

The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs: How do we compare to the Squeeze and Wheezy release cycles?
Week Squeeze Wheezy Jessie
43 284 (213+71) 468 (332+136) 319 (240+79)
44 261 (201+60) 408 (265+143) 274 (224+50)
45 261 (205+56) 425 (291+134) 295 (229+66)
46 271 (200+71) 401 (258+143) 427 (313+114)
47 283 (209+74) 366 (221+145) 342 (260+82)
48 256 (177+79) 378 (230+148) 274 (189+85)
49 256 (180+76) 360 (216+155) 226 (147+79)
50 204 (148+56) 339 (195+144) ???
51 178 (124+54) 323 (190+133) 189 (134+55)
52 115 (78+37) 289 (190+99) 147 (112+35)
1 93 (60+33) 287 (171+116) 140 (104+36)
2 82 (46+36) 271 (162+109) 157 (124+33)
3 25 (15+10) 249 (165+84) 172 (128+44)
4 14 (8+6) 244 (176+68) 187 (132+55)
5 2 (0+2) 224 (132+92) 175 (124+51)
6 release! 212 (129+83) 161 (109+52)
7 release+1 194 (128+66) 147 (106+41)
8 release+2 206 (144+62) 147 (96+51)
9 release+3 174 (105+69) 152 (101+51)
10 release+4 120 (72+48) 112 (82+30)
11 release+5 115 (74+41) 97 (68+29)
12 release+6 93 (47+46) 87 (71+16)
13 release+7 50 (24+26)
14 release+8 51 (32+19)
15 release+9 39 (32+7)
16 release+10 20 (12+8)
17 release+11 24 (19+5)
18 release+12 2 (2+0)
Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

13 March 2015

Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 11

The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs: How do we compare to the Squeeze and Wheezy release cycles?
Week Squeeze Wheezy Jessie
43 284 (213+71) 468 (332+136) 319 (240+79)
44 261 (201+60) 408 (265+143) 274 (224+50)
45 261 (205+56) 425 (291+134) 295 (229+66)
46 271 (200+71) 401 (258+143) 427 (313+114)
47 283 (209+74) 366 (221+145) 342 (260+82)
48 256 (177+79) 378 (230+148) 274 (189+85)
49 256 (180+76) 360 (216+155) 226 (147+79)
50 204 (148+56) 339 (195+144) ???
51 178 (124+54) 323 (190+133) 189 (134+55)
52 115 (78+37) 289 (190+99) 147 (112+35)
1 93 (60+33) 287 (171+116) 140 (104+36)
2 82 (46+36) 271 (162+109) 157 (124+33)
3 25 (15+10) 249 (165+84) 172 (128+44)
4 14 (8+6) 244 (176+68) 187 (132+55)
5 2 (0+2) 224 (132+92) 175 (124+51)
6 release! 212 (129+83) 161 (109+52)
7 release+1 194 (128+66) 147 (106+41)
8 release+2 206 (144+62) 147 (96+51)
9 release+3 174 (105+69) 152 (101+51)
10 release+4 120 (72+48) 112 (82+30)
11 release+5 115 (74+41) 97 (68+29)
12 release+6 93 (47+46)
13 release+7 50 (24+26)
14 release+8 51 (32+19)
15 release+9 39 (32+7)
16 release+10 20 (12+8)
17 release+11 24 (19+5)
18 release+12 2 (2+0)
Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

11 March 2015

Richard Hartmann: 100g for deleting

On the assumption that the post titled "Delete file when you have more than 100g for deleting" on the "Linux.com - Content Feed" is not an elaborate joke, it's not unlikely that it will be deleted so I will conserve it here: Hello Linix community members, Today I would like to share a simple script for deleting files when you have more than 100g for deleting and when you try to delete using rm -rm /path/fo/files failed. To do this I use the following procedure; first I use a "for" ciclo to read file that I going to delete also you can use a mtime for calculate file's date that you're going to delete or you can to calculate previous date of a past day "x=TZ=GMT+24 date +%Y%m%d" Ex;
#!/bin/bash -x
x= TZ=GMT+24 date +%Y%m%d 
delcnt=0
for files in  find /path/of/file/to/eraser/ -name \*$x*.bin.gz 
do
echo "Deleting file $files"
/bin/rm -rf $files
delcnt=$(($delcnt + 1))
done

Best regards Charles E. Rivera Solaris Server Specialist Engeeneer But then, Linux.com still aggregates Phoronix, so their focus is not exactly on quality.

09 March 2015

Axel Beckert: Do we need a zsh-static package in Debian?

Dear Planet Debian, the Debian Zsh Packaging Team (consisting of Michael Prokop, Frank Terbeck, Richard Hartmann and myself) wonders if there s still a reason to build and ship a zsh-static package in Debian. There are multiple reasons: So we ask you, the Planet Debian reader:

Do you need Debian s zsh-static package? If so, please send an e-mail to us Debian Zsh Maintainers <pkg-zsh-devel@lists.alioth.debian.org> and state that you use zsh-static, and, if you want, please also state why or how you re using it. Thanks in advance! Mika, Frank, RichiH and Axel

Axel Beckert: Do we need a zsh-static package in Debian?

Dear Planet Debian, the Debian Zsh Packaging Team (consisting of Michael Prokop, Frank Terbeck, Richard Hartmann and myself) wonders if there s still a reason to build and ship a zsh-static package in Debian. There are multiple reasons: So we ask you, the Planet Debian reader:

Do you need Debian s zsh-static package? If so, please send an e-mail to us Debian Zsh Maintainers <pkg-zsh-devel@lists.alioth.debian.org> and state that you use zsh-static, and, if you want, please also state why or how you re using it. Thanks in advance! Mika, Frank, RichiH and Axel

06 March 2015

Richard Hartmann: Release Critical Bug report for Week 10

The UDD bugs interface currently knows about the following release critical bugs: How do we compare to the Squeeze and Wheezy release cycles?
Week Squeeze Wheezy Jessie
43 284 (213+71) 468 (332+136) 319 (240+79)
44 261 (201+60) 408 (265+143) 274 (224+50)
45 261 (205+56) 425 (291+134) 295 (229+66)
46 271 (200+71) 401 (258+143) 427 (313+114)
47 283 (209+74) 366 (221+145) 342 (260+82)
48 256 (177+79) 378 (230+148) 274 (189+85)
49 256 (180+76) 360 (216+155) 226 (147+79)
50 204 (148+56) 339 (195+144) ???
51 178 (124+54) 323 (190+133) 189 (134+55)
52 115 (78+37) 289 (190+99) 147 (112+35)
1 93 (60+33) 287 (171+116) 140 (104+36)
2 82 (46+36) 271 (162+109) 157 (124+33)
3 25 (15+10) 249 (165+84) 172 (128+44)
4 14 (8+6) 244 (176+68) 187 (132+55)
5 2 (0+2) 224 (132+92) 175 (124+51)
6 release! 212 (129+83) 161 (109+52)
7 release+1 194 (128+66) 147 (106+41)
8 release+2 206 (144+62) 147 (96+51)
9 release+3 174 (105+69) 152 (101+51)
10 release+4 120 (72+48) 112 (82+30)
11 release+5 115 (74+41)
12 release+6 93 (47+46)
13 release+7 50 (24+26)
14 release+8 51 (32+19)
15 release+9 39 (32+7)
16 release+10 20 (12+8)
17 release+11 24 (19+5)
18 release+12 2 (2+0)
Graphical overview of bug stats thanks to azhag:

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