Search Results: "Petter Reinholdtsen"

6 June 2020

Petter Reinholdtsen: Secure Socket API - a simple and powerful approach for TLS support in software

As a member of the Norwegian Unix User Group, I have the pleasure of receiving the USENIX magazine ;login: several times a year. I rarely have time to read all the articles, but try to at least skim through them all as there is a lot of nice knowledge passed on there. I even carry the latest issue with me most of the time to try to get through all the articles when I have a few spare minutes. The other day I came across a nice article titled "The Secure Socket API: TLS as an Operating System Service" with a marvellous idea I hope can make it all the way into the POSIX standard. The idea is as simple as it is powerful. By introducing a new socket() option IPPROTO_TLS to use TLS, and a system wide service to handle setting up TLS connections, one both make it trivial to add TLS support to any program currently using the POSIX socket API, and gain system wide control over certificates, TLS versions and encryption systems used. Instead of doing this:
int socket = socket(PF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, IPPROTO_TCP);
the program code would be doing this:
int socket = socket(PF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, IPPROTO_TLS);
According to the ;login: article, converting a C program to use TLS would normally modify only 5-10 lines in the code, which is amazing when compared to using for example the OpenSSL API. The project has set up the https://securesocketapi.org/ web site to spread the idea, and the code for a kernel module and the associated system daemon is available from two github repositories: ssa and ssa-daemon. Unfortunately there is no explicit license information with the code, so its copyright status is unclear. A request to solve this about it has been unsolved since 2018-08-17. I love the idea of extending socket() to gain TLS support, and understand why it is an advantage to implement this as a kernel module and system wide service daemon, but can not help to think that it would be a lot easier to get projects to move to this way of setting up TLS if it was done with a user space approach where programs wanting to use this API approach could just link with a wrapper library. I recommend you check out this simple and powerful approach to more secure network connections. :) As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

24 May 2020

Petter Reinholdtsen: More reliable vlc bittorrent plugin in Debian (version 2.9)

I am very happy to report that a more reliable VLC bittorrent plugin was just uploaded into debian. This fixes a couple of crash bugs in the plugin, hopefully making the VLC experience even better when streaming directly from a bittorrent source. The package is currently in Debian unstable, but should be available in Debian testing in two days. To test it, simply install it like this:
apt install vlc-plugin-bittorrent
After it is installed, you can try to use it to play a file downloaded live via bittorrent like this:
vlc https://archive.org/download/Glass_201703/Glass_201703_archive.torrent
It also support magnet links and local .torrent files. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

12 May 2020

Petter Reinholdtsen: Debian Edu interview: Yvan Masson

It has been way too long since my last interview, but as the Debian Edu / Skolelinux community is still active, and new people keep showing up on the IRC channel #debian-edu and the debian-edu mailing list, I decided to give it another go. I was hoping someone else might pick up the idea and run with it, but this has not happened as far as I can tell, so here we are This time the announcement of a new free software tool to create a school year book triggered my interest, and I decided to learn more about its author. Who are you, and how do you spend your days? My name is Yvan MASSON, I live in France. I have my own one person business in computer services. The work consist of visiting my customers (person's home, local authority, small business) to give advise, install computers and software, fix issues, and provide computing usage training. I spend the rest of my time enjoying my family and promoting free software. What is your approach for promoting free software? When I think that free software could be suitable for someone, I explain what it is, with simple words, give a few known examples, and explain that while there is no fee it is a viable alternative in many situations. Most people are receptive when you explain how it is better (I simplify arguments here, I know that it is not so simple): Linux works on older hardware, there are no viruses, and the software can be audited to ensure user is not spied upon. I think the most important is to keep a clear but moderated speech: when you try to convince too much, people feel attacked and stop listening. How did you get in contact with the Skolelinux / Debian Edu project? I can not remember how I first heard of Skolelinux / Debian Edu, but probably on planet.debian.org. As I have been working for a school, I have interest in this type of project. The school I am involved in is a school for "children" between 14 and 18 years old. The French government has recommended free software since 2012, but they do not always use free software themselves. The school computers are still using the Windows operating system, but all of them have the classic set of free software: Firefox ESR, LibreOffice (with the excellent extension Grammalecte that indicates French grammatical errors), SumatraPDF, Audacity, 7zip, KeePass2, VLC, GIMP, Inkscape What do you see as the advantages of Skolelinux / Debian Edu? It is free software! Built on Debian, I am sure that users are not spied upon, and that it can run on low end hardware. This last point is very important, because we really need to improve "green IT". I do not know enough about Skolelinux / Debian Edu to tell how it is better than another free software solution, but what I like is the "all in one" solution: everything has been thought of and prepared to ease installation and usage. I like Free Software because I hate using something that I can not understand. I do not say that I can understand everything nor that I want to understand everything, but knowing that someone / some company intentionally prevents me from understanding how things work is really unacceptable to me. Secondly, and more importantly, free software is a requirement to prevent abuses regarding human rights and environmental care. Humanity can not rely on tools that are in the hands of small group of people. What do you see as the disadvantages of Skolelinux / Debian Edu? Again, I don't know this project enough. Maybe a dedicated website? Debian wiki works well for documentation, but is not very appealing to someone discovering the project. Also, as Skolelinux / Debian Edu uses OpenLDAP, it probably means that Windows workstations cannot use centralized authentication. Maybe the project could use Samba as an Active Directory domain controller instead, allowing Windows desktop usage when necessary. (Editors note: In fact Windows workstations can use the centralized authentication in a Debian Edu setup, at least for some versions of Windows, but the fact that this is not well known can be seen as an indication of the need for better documentation and marketing. :) Which free software do you use daily? Nothing original: Debian testing/sid with Gnome desktop, Firefox, Thunderbird, LibreOffice Which strategy do you believe is the right one to use to get schools to use free software? Every effort to spread free software into schools is important, whatever it is. But I think, at least where I live, that IT professionals maintaining schools networks are still very "Microsoft centric". Schools will use any working solution, but they need people to install and maintain it. How to make these professionals sensitive about free software and train them with solutions like Debian Edu / Skolelinux is a really good question :-)

8 May 2020

Petter Reinholdtsen: Jami as a Zoom client, a trick for password protected rooms...

Half a year ago, I wrote about the Jami communication client, capable of peer-to-peer encrypted communication. It handle both messages, audio and video. It uses distributed hash tables instead of central infrastructure to connect its users to each other, which in my book is a plus. I mentioned briefly that it could also work as a SIP client, which came in handy when the higher educational sector in Norway started to promote Zoom as its video conferencing solution. I am reluctant to use the official Zoom client software, due to their copyright license clauses prohibiting users to reverse engineer (for example to check the security) and benchmark it, and thus prefer to connect to Zoom meetings with free software clients. Jami worked OK as a SIP client to Zoom as long as there was no password set on the room. The Jami daemon leak memory like crazy (approximately 1 GiB a minute) when I am connected to the video conference, so I had to restart the client every 7-10 minutes, which is not a great. I tried to get other SIP Linux clients to work without success, so I decided I would have to live with this wart until someone managed to fix the leak in the dring code base. But another problem showed up once the rooms were password protected. I could not get my dial tone signaling through from Jami to Zoom, and dial tone signaling is used to enter the password when connecting to Zoom. I tried a lot of different permutations with my Jami and Asterisk setup to try to figure out why the signaling did not get through, only to finally discover that the fundamental problem seem to be that Zoom is simply not able to receive dial tone signaling when connecting via SIP. There seem to be nothing wrong with the Jami and Asterisk end, it is simply broken in the Zoom end. I got help from a very skilled VoIP engineer figuring out this last part. And being a very skilled engineer, he was also able to locate a solution for me. Or to be exact, a workaround that solve my initial problem of connecting to password protected Zoom rooms using Jami. So, how do you do this, I am sure you are wondering by now. The trick is already documented from Zoom, and it is to modify the SIP address to include the room password. What is most surprising about this is that the automatically generated email from Zoom with instructions on how to connect via SIP do not mention this. The SIP address to use normally consist of the room ID (a number), an @ character and the IP address of the Zoom SIP gateway. But Zoom understand a lot more than just the room ID in front of the at sign. The format is "[Meeting ID].[Password].[Layout].[Host Key]", and you can hear see how you can both enter password, control the layout (full screen, active presence and gallery) and specify the host key to start the meeting. The full SIP address entered into Jami to provide the password will then look like this (all using made up numbers):
sip:657837644.522827@192.168.169.170
Now if only jami would reduce its memory usage, I could even recommend this setup to others. :) As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

29 April 2020

Petter Reinholdtsen: GnuCOBOL, a free platform to learn and use COBOL - nice free software

The curiosity got the better of me when Slashdot reported that New Jersey was desperately looking for COBOL programmers, and a few days later it was reported that IBM tried to locate COBOL programmers. I thus decided to have a look at free software alternatives to learn COBOL, and had the pleasure to find GnuCOBOL was already in Debian. It used to be called Open Cobol, and is a "compiler" transforming COBOL code to C or C++ before giving it to GCC or Visual Studio to build binaries. I managed to get in touch with upstream, and was impressed with the quick response, and also was happy to see a new Debian maintainer taking over when the original one recently asked to be replaced. A new Debian upload was done as recently as yesterday. Using the Debian package, I was able to follow a simple COBOL introduction and make and run simple COBOL programs. It was fun to learn a new programming language. If you want to test for yourself, the GnuCOBOL Wikipedia page have a few simple examples to get you startet. As I do not have much experience with COBOL, I do not know how standard compliant it is, but it claim to pass most tests from COBOL test suite, which sound good to me. It is nice to know it is possible to learn COBOL using software without any usage restrictions, and I am very happy such nice free software project as this is available. If you as me is curious about COBOL, check it out. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

2 March 2020

Petter Reinholdtsen: Nikita version 0.5 released - updated free software archive API server

Today, after many months of development, a new release of Nikita Noark 5 core project was finally announced on the project mailing list. The Nikita free software solution is an implementation of the Norwegian archive standard Noark 5 used by government offices in Norway. These were the changes in version 0.5 since version 0.4, see the email link above for links to a demo site: If free and open standardized archiving API sound interesting to you, please contact us on IRC (#nikita on irc.freenode.net) or email (nikita-noark mailing list). As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

18 November 2017

Petter Reinholdtsen: Legal to share more than 3000 movies listed on IMDB?

A month ago, I blogged about my work to automatically check the copyright status of IMDB entries, and try to count the number of movies listed in IMDB that is legal to distribute on the Internet. I have continued to look for good data sources, and identified a few more. The code used to extract information from various data sources is available in a git repository, currently available from github. So far I have identified 3186 unique IMDB title IDs. To gain better understanding of the structure of the data set, I created a histogram of the year associated with each movie (typically release year). It is interesting to notice where the peaks and dips in the graph are located. I wonder why they are placed there. I suspect World War II caused the dip around 1940, but what caused the peak around 2010?

I've so far identified ten sources for IMDB title IDs for movies in the public domain or with a free license. This is the statistics reported when running 'make stats' in the git repository:

  249 entries (    6 unique) with and   288 without IMDB title ID in free-movies-archive-org-butter.json
 2301 entries (  540 unique) with and     0 without IMDB title ID in free-movies-archive-org-wikidata.json
  830 entries (   29 unique) with and     0 without IMDB title ID in free-movies-icheckmovies-archive-mochard.json
 2109 entries (  377 unique) with and     0 without IMDB title ID in free-movies-imdb-pd.json
  291 entries (  122 unique) with and     0 without IMDB title ID in free-movies-letterboxd-pd.json
  144 entries (  135 unique) with and     0 without IMDB title ID in free-movies-manual.json
  350 entries (    1 unique) with and   801 without IMDB title ID in free-movies-publicdomainmovies.json
    4 entries (    0 unique) with and   124 without IMDB title ID in free-movies-publicdomainreview.json
  698 entries (  119 unique) with and   118 without IMDB title ID in free-movies-publicdomaintorrents.json
    8 entries (    8 unique) with and   196 without IMDB title ID in free-movies-vodo.json
 3186 unique IMDB title IDs in total
The entries without IMDB title ID are candidates to increase the data set, but might equally well be duplicates of entries already listed with IMDB title ID in one of the other sources, or represent movies that lack a IMDB title ID. I've seen examples of all these situations when peeking at the entries without IMDB title ID. Based on these data sources, the lower bound for movies listed in IMDB that are legal to distribute on the Internet is between 3186 and 4713. It would be great for improving the accuracy of this measurement, if the various sources added IMDB title ID to their metadata. I have tried to reach the people behind the various sources to ask if they are interested in doing this, without any replies so far. Perhaps you can help me get in touch with the people behind VODO, Public Domain Torrents, Public Domain Movies and Public Domain Review to try to convince them to add more metadata to their movie entries? Another way you could help is by adding pages to Wikipedia about movies that are legal to distribute on the Internet. If such page exist and include a link to both IMDB and The Internet Archive, the script used to generate free-movies-archive-org-wikidata.json should pick up the mapping as soon as wikidata is updates. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

1 November 2017

Petter Reinholdtsen: Some notes on fault tolerant storage systems

If you care about how fault tolerant your storage is, you might find these articles and papers interesting. They have formed how I think of when designing a storage system. Several of these research papers are based on data collected from hundred thousands or millions of disk, and their findings are eye opening. The short story is simply do not implicitly trust RAID or redundant storage systems. Details matter. And unfortunately there are few options on Linux addressing all the identified issues. Both ZFS and Btrfs are doing a fairly good job, but have legal and practical issues on their own. I wonder how cluster file systems like Ceph do in this regard. After all, there is an old saying, you know you have a distributed system when the crash of a compyter you have never heard of stops you from getting any work done. The same holds true if fault tolerance do not work. Just remember, in the end, it do not matter how redundant, or how fault tolerant your storage is, if you do not continuously monitor its status to detect and replace failed disks.

31 October 2017

Petter Reinholdtsen: Web services for writing academic LaTeX papers as a team

I was surprised today to learn that a friend in academia did not know there are easily available web services available for writing LaTeX documents as a team. I thought it was common knowledge, but to make sure at least my readers are aware of it, I would like to mention these useful services for writing LaTeX documents. Some of them even provide a WYSIWYG editor to ease writing even further. There are two commercial services available, ShareLaTeX and Overleaf. They are very easy to use. Just start a new document, select which publisher to write for (ie which LaTeX style to use), and start writing. Note, these two have announced their intention to join forces, so soon it will only be one joint service. I've used both for different documents, and they work just fine. While ShareLaTeX is free software, while the latter is not. According to a announcement from Overleaf, they plan to keep the ShareLaTeX code base maintained as free software. But these two are not the only alternatives. Fidus Writer is another free software solution with the source available on github. I have not used it myself. Several others can be found on the nice alterntiveTo web service. If you like Google Docs or Etherpad, but would like to write documents in LaTeX, you should check out these services. You can even host your own, if you want to. :)

25 October 2017

Petter Reinholdtsen: Locating IMDB IDs of movies in the Internet Archive using Wikidata

Recently, I needed to automatically check the copyright status of a set of The Internet Movie database (IMDB) entries, to figure out which one of the movies they refer to can be freely distributed on the Internet. This proved to be harder than it sounds. IMDB for sure list movies without any copyright protection, where the copyright protection has expired or where the movie is lisenced using a permissive license like one from Creative Commons. These are mixed with copyright protected movies, and there seem to be no way to separate these classes of movies using the information in IMDB. First I tried to look up entries manually in IMDB, Wikipedia and The Internet Archive, to get a feel how to do this. It is hard to know for sure using these sources, but it should be possible to be reasonable confident a movie is "out of copyright" with a few hours work per movie. As I needed to check almost 20,000 entries, this approach was not sustainable. I simply can not work around the clock for about 6 years to check this data set. I asked the people behind The Internet Archive if they could introduce a new metadata field in their metadata XML for IMDB ID, but was told that they leave it completely to the uploaders to update the metadata. Some of the metadata entries had IMDB links in the description, but I found no way to download all metadata files in bulk to locate those ones and put that approach aside. In the process I noticed several Wikipedia articles about movies had links to both IMDB and The Internet Archive, and it occured to me that I could use the Wikipedia RDF data set to locate entries with both, to at least get a lower bound on the number of movies on The Internet Archive with a IMDB ID. This is useful based on the assumption that movies distributed by The Internet Archive can be legally distributed on the Internet. With some help from the RDF community (thank you DanC), I was able to come up with this query to pass to the SPARQL interface on Wikidata:
SELECT ?work ?imdb ?ia ?when ?label
WHERE
 
  ?work wdt:P31/wdt:P279* wd:Q11424.
  ?work wdt:P345 ?imdb.
  ?work wdt:P724 ?ia.
  OPTIONAL  
        ?work wdt:P577 ?when.
        ?work rdfs:label ?label.
        FILTER(LANG(?label) = "en").
   
 
If I understand the query right, for every film entry anywhere in Wikpedia, it will return the IMDB ID and The Internet Archive ID, and when the movie was released and its English title, if either or both of the latter two are available. At the moment the result set contain 2338 entries. Of course, it depend on volunteers including both correct IMDB and The Internet Archive IDs in the wikipedia articles for the movie. It should be noted that the result will include duplicates if the movie have entries in several languages. There are some bogus entries, either because The Internet Archive ID contain a typo or because the movie is not available from The Internet Archive. I did not verify the IMDB IDs, as I am unsure how to do that automatically. I wrote a small python script to extract the data set from Wikidata and check if the XML metadata for the movie is available from The Internet Archive, and after around 1.5 hour it produced a list of 2097 free movies and their IMDB ID. In total, 171 entries in Wikidata lack the refered Internet Archive entry. I assume the 70 "disappearing" entries (ie 2338-2097-171) are duplicate entries. This is not too bad, given that The Internet Archive report to contain 5331 feature films at the moment, but it also mean more than 3000 movies are missing on Wikipedia or are missing the pair of references on Wikipedia. I was curious about the distribution by release year, and made a little graph to show how the amount of free movies is spread over the years: I expect the relative distribution of the remaining 3000 movies to be similar. If you want to help, and want to ensure Wikipedia can be used to cross reference The Internet Archive and The Internet Movie Database, please make sure entries like this are listed under the "External links" heading on the Wikipedia article for the movie:
*  Internet Archive film id=FightingLady 
*  IMDb title id=0036823 title=The Fighting Lady 
Please verify the links on the final page, to make sure you did not introduce a typo. Here is the complete list, if you want to correct the 171 identified Wikipedia entries with broken links to The Internet Archive: Q1140317, Q458656, Q458656, Q470560, Q743340, Q822580, Q480696, Q128761, Q1307059, Q1335091, Q1537166, Q1438334, Q1479751, Q1497200, Q1498122, Q865973, Q834269, Q841781, Q841781, Q1548193, Q499031, Q1564769, Q1585239, Q1585569, Q1624236, Q4796595, Q4853469, Q4873046, Q915016, Q4660396, Q4677708, Q4738449, Q4756096, Q4766785, Q880357, Q882066, Q882066, Q204191, Q204191, Q1194170, Q940014, Q946863, Q172837, Q573077, Q1219005, Q1219599, Q1643798, Q1656352, Q1659549, Q1660007, Q1698154, Q1737980, Q1877284, Q1199354, Q1199354, Q1199451, Q1211871, Q1212179, Q1238382, Q4906454, Q320219, Q1148649, Q645094, Q5050350, Q5166548, Q2677926, Q2698139, Q2707305, Q2740725, Q2024780, Q2117418, Q2138984, Q1127992, Q1058087, Q1070484, Q1080080, Q1090813, Q1251918, Q1254110, Q1257070, Q1257079, Q1197410, Q1198423, Q706951, Q723239, Q2079261, Q1171364, Q617858, Q5166611, Q5166611, Q324513, Q374172, Q7533269, Q970386, Q976849, Q7458614, Q5347416, Q5460005, Q5463392, Q3038555, Q5288458, Q2346516, Q5183645, Q5185497, Q5216127, Q5223127, Q5261159, Q1300759, Q5521241, Q7733434, Q7736264, Q7737032, Q7882671, Q7719427, Q7719444, Q7722575, Q2629763, Q2640346, Q2649671, Q7703851, Q7747041, Q6544949, Q6672759, Q2445896, Q12124891, Q3127044, Q2511262, Q2517672, Q2543165, Q426628, Q426628, Q12126890, Q13359969, Q13359969, Q2294295, Q2294295, Q2559509, Q2559912, Q7760469, Q6703974, Q4744, Q7766962, Q7768516, Q7769205, Q7769988, Q2946945, Q3212086, Q3212086, Q18218448, Q18218448, Q18218448, Q6909175, Q7405709, Q7416149, Q7239952, Q7317332, Q7783674, Q7783704, Q7857590, Q3372526, Q3372642, Q3372816, Q3372909, Q7959649, Q7977485, Q7992684, Q3817966, Q3821852, Q3420907, Q3429733, Q774474

14 October 2017

Petter Reinholdtsen: A one-way wall on the border?

I find it fascinating how many of the people being locked inside the proposed border wall between USA and Mexico support the idea. The proposal to keep Mexicans out reminds me of the propaganda twist from the East Germany government calling the wall the Antifascist Bulwark after erecting the Berlin Wall, claiming that the wall was erected to keep enemies from creeping into East Germany, while it was obvious to the people locked inside it that it was erected to keep the people from escaping. Do the people in USA supporting this wall really believe it is a one way wall, only keeping people on the outside from getting in, while not keeping people in the inside from getting out?

9 October 2017

Petter Reinholdtsen: Generating 3D prints in Debian using Cura and Slic3r(-prusa)

At my nearby maker space, Sonen, I heard the story that it was easier to generate gcode files for theyr 3D printers (Ultimake 2+) on Windows and MacOS X than Linux, because the software involved had to be manually compiled and set up on Linux while premade packages worked out of the box on Windows and MacOS X. I found this annoying, as the software involved, Cura, is free software and should be trivial to get up and running on Linux if someone took the time to package it for the relevant distributions. I even found a request for adding into Debian from 2013, which had seem some activity over the years but never resulted in the software showing up in Debian. So a few days ago I offered my help to try to improve the situation. Now I am very happy to see that all the packages required by a working Cura in Debian are uploaded into Debian and waiting in the NEW queue for the ftpmasters to have a look. You can track the progress on the status page for the 3D printer team. The uploaded packages are a bit behind upstream, and was uploaded now to get slots in the NEW queue while we work up updating the packages to the latest upstream version. On a related note, two competitors for Cura, which I found harder to use and was unable to configure correctly for Ultimaker 2+ in the short time I spent on it, are already in Debian. If you are looking for 3D printer "slicers" and want something already available in Debian, check out slic3r and slic3r-prusa. The latter is a fork of the former.

29 September 2017

Petter Reinholdtsen: Visualizing GSM radio chatter using gr-gsm and Hopglass

Every mobile phone announce its existence over radio to the nearby mobile cell towers. And this radio chatter is available for anyone with a radio receiver capable of receiving them. Details about the mobile phones with very good accuracy is of course collected by the phone companies, but this is not the topic of this blog post. The mobile phone radio chatter make it possible to figure out when a cell phone is nearby, as it include the SIM card ID (IMSI). By paying attention over time, one can see when a phone arrive and when it leave an area. I believe it would be nice to make this information more available to the general public, to make more people aware of how their phones are announcing their whereabouts to anyone that care to listen. I am very happy to report that we managed to get something visualizing this information up and running for Oslo Skaperfestival 2017 (Oslo Makers Festival) taking place today and tomorrow at Deichmanske library. The solution is based on the simple recipe for listening to GSM chatter I posted a few days ago, and will show up at the stand of pen Sone from the Computer Science department of the University of Oslo. The presentation will show the nearby mobile phones (aka IMSIs) as dots in a web browser graph, with lines to the dot representing mobile base station it is talking to. It was working in the lab yesterday, and was moved into place this morning. We set up a fairly powerful desktop machine using Debian Buster/Testing with several (five, I believe) RTL2838 DVB-T receivers connected and visualize the visible cell phone towers using an English version of Hopglass. A fairly powerfull machine is needed as the grgsm_livemon_headless processes from gr-gsm converting the radio signal to data packages is quite CPU intensive. The frequencies to listen to, are identified using a slightly patched scan-and-livemon (to set the --args values for each receiver), and the Hopglass data is generated using the patches in my meshviewer-output branch. For some reason we could not get more than four SDRs working. There is also a geographical map trying to show the location of the base stations, but I believe their coordinates are hardcoded to some random location in Germany, I believe. The code should be replaced with code to look up location in a text file, a sqlite database or one of the online databases mentioned in the github issue for the topic. If this sound interesting, visit the stand at the festival!

24 September 2017

Petter Reinholdtsen: Easier recipe to observe the cell phones around you

A little more than a month ago I wrote how to observe the SIM card ID (aka IMSI number) of mobile phones talking to nearby mobile phone base stations using Debian GNU/Linux and a cheap USB software defined radio, and thus being able to pinpoint the location of people and equipment (like cars and trains) with an accuracy of a few kilometer. Since then we have worked to make the procedure even simpler, and it is now possible to do this without any manual frequency tuning and without building your own packages. The gr-gsm package is now included in Debian testing and unstable, and the IMSI-catcher code no longer require root access to fetch and decode the GSM data collected using gr-gsm. Here is an updated recipe, using packages built by Debian and a git clone of two python scripts:
  1. Start with a Debian machine running the Buster version (aka testing).
  2. Run 'apt install gr-gsm python-numpy python-scipy python-scapy' as root to install required packages.
  3. Fetch the code decoding GSM packages using 'git clone github.com/Oros42/IMSI-catcher.git'.
  4. Insert USB software defined radio supported by GNU Radio.
  5. Enter the IMSI-catcher directory and run 'python scan-and-livemon' to locate the frequency of nearby base stations and start listening for GSM packages on one of them.
  6. Enter the IMSI-catcher directory and run 'python simple_IMSI-catcher.py' to display the collected information.
Note, due to a bug somewhere the scan-and-livemon program (actually its underlying program grgsm_scanner) do not work with the HackRF radio. It does work with RTL 8232 and other similar USB radio receivers you can get very cheaply (for example from ebay), so for now the solution is to scan using the RTL radio and only use HackRF for fetching GSM data. As far as I can tell, a cell phone only show up on one of the frequencies at the time, so if you are going to track and count every cell phone around you, you need to listen to all the frequencies used. To listen to several frequencies, use the --numrecv argument to scan-and-livemon to use several receivers. Further, I am not sure if phones using 3G or 4G will show as talking GSM to base stations, so this approach might not see all phones around you. I typically see 0-400 IMSI numbers an hour when looking around where I live. I've tried to run the scanner on a Raspberry Pi 2 and 3 running Debian Buster, but the grgsm_livemon_headless process seem to be too CPU intensive to keep up. When GNU Radio print 'O' to stdout, I am told there it is caused by a buffer overflow between the radio and GNU Radio, caused by the program being unable to read the GSM data fast enough. If you see a stream of 'O's from the terminal where you started scan-and-livemon, you need a give the process more CPU power. Perhaps someone are able to optimize the code to a point where it become possible to set up RPi3 based GSM sniffers? I tried using Raspbian instead of Debian, but there seem to be something wrong with GNU Radio on raspbian, causing glibc to abort().

9 August 2017

Petter Reinholdtsen: Simpler recipe on how to make a simple $7 IMSI Catcher using Debian

On friday, I came across an interesting article in the Norwegian web based ICT news magazine digi.no on how to collect the IMSI numbers of nearby cell phones using the cheap DVB-T software defined radios. The article refered to instructions and a recipe by Keld Norman on Youtube on how to make a simple $7 IMSI Catcher, and I decided to test them out. The instructions said to use Ubuntu, install pip using apt (to bypass apt), use pip to install pybombs (to bypass both apt and pip), and the ask pybombs to fetch and build everything you need from scratch. I wanted to see if I could do the same on the most recent Debian packages, but this did not work because pybombs tried to build stuff that no longer build with the most recent openssl library or some other version skew problem. While trying to get this recipe working, I learned that the apt->pip->pybombs route was a long detour, and the only piece of software dependency missing in Debian was the gr-gsm package. I also found out that the lead upstream developer of gr-gsm (the name stand for GNU Radio GSM) project already had a set of Debian packages provided in an Ubuntu PPA repository. All I needed to do was to dget the Debian source package and built it. The IMSI collector is a python script listening for packages on the loopback network device and printing to the terminal some specific GSM packages with IMSI numbers in them. The code is fairly short and easy to understand. The reason this work is because gr-gsm include a tool to read GSM data from a software defined radio like a DVB-T USB stick and other software defined radios, decode them and inject them into a network device on your Linux machine (using the loopback device by default). This proved to work just fine, and I've been testing the collector for a few days now. The updated and simpler recipe is thus to
  1. start with a Debian machine running Stretch or newer,
  2. build and install the gr-gsm package available from http://ppa.launchpad.net/ptrkrysik/gr-gsm/ubuntu/pool/main/g/gr-gsm/,
  3. clone the git repostory from https://github.com/Oros42/IMSI-catcher,
  4. run grgsm_livemon and adjust the frequency until the terminal where it was started is filled with a stream of text (meaning you found a GSM station).
  5. go into the IMSI-catcher directory and run 'sudo python simple_IMSI-catcher.py' to extract the IMSI numbers.
To make it even easier in the future to get this sniffer up and running, I decided to package the gr-gsm project for Debian (WNPP #871055), and the package was uploaded into the NEW queue today. Luckily the gnuradio maintainer has promised to help me, as I do not know much about gnuradio stuff yet. I doubt this "IMSI cacher" is anywhere near as powerfull as commercial tools like The Spy Phone Portable IMSI / IMEI Catcher or the Harris Stingray, but I hope the existance of cheap alternatives can make more people realise how their whereabouts when carrying a cell phone is easily tracked. Seeing the data flow on the screen, realizing that I live close to a police station and knowing that the police is also wearing cell phones, I wonder how hard it would be for criminals to track the position of the police officers to discover when there are police near by, or for foreign military forces to track the location of the Norwegian military forces, or for anyone to track the location of government officials... It is worth noting that the data reported by the IMSI-catcher script mentioned above is only a fraction of the data broadcasted on the GSM network. It will only collect one frequency at the time, while a typical phone will be using several frequencies, and not all phones will be using the frequencies tracked by the grgsm_livemod program. Also, there is a lot of radio chatter being ignored by the simple_IMSI-catcher script, which would be collected by extending the parser code. I wonder if gr-gsm can be set up to listen to more than one frequency?

7 August 2017

Raphaël Hertzog: My Free Software Activities in July 2017

My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me. Debian LTS This month I was allocated 12 hours but I only managed to work for 7 hours (due to vacation and unanticipated customer work). I gave back the remaining hours to the pool as I didn t want to carry them over for August which will be also short due to vacation (BTW I m not attending Debconf). I spent my 7 hours doing CVE triaging during the week where I was in charge of the LTS frontdesk (I committed 22 updates to the security tracker). I did publish DLA-1010-1 on vorbis-tools but the package update had been prepared by Petter Reinholdtsen. Misc Debian work zim. I published an updated package in experimental (0.67~rc2-2) with the upstream bug fixes on the current release candidate. The final version has been released during my vacation and I will soon upload it to unstable. Debian Handbook. I worked with Petter Reinholdtsen to finalize the paperback version of the Norwegian translation of the Debian Administrator s Handbook (still covering Debian 8 Jessie). It s now available. Bug reports. I filed a few bugs related to my Kali work. #868678: autopkgtest s setup-testbed script is not friendly to derivatives. #868749: aideinit fails with syntax errors when /etc/debian_version contains spaces. debian-installer. I submitted a few d-i patches that I prepared for a customer who had some specific needs (using the hd-media image to boot the installer from an ISO stored in an LVM logical volume). I made changes to debian-installer-utils (#868848), debian-installer (#868852), and iso-scan (#868859, #868900). Thanks See you next month for a new summary of my activities.

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25 July 2017

Petter Reinholdtsen: Norwegian Bokm l edition of Debian Administrator's Handbook is now available

I finally received a copy of the Norwegian Bokm l edition of "The Debian Administrator's Handbook". This test copy arrived in the mail a few days ago, and I am very happy to hold the result in my hand. We spent around one and a half year translating it. This paperbook edition is available from lulu.com. If you buy it quickly, you save 25% on the list price. The book is also available for download in electronic form as PDF, EPUB and Mobipocket, as can be read online as a web page. This is the second book I publish (the first was the book "Free Culture" by Lawrence Lessig in English, French and Norwegian Bokm l), and I am very excited to finally wrap up this project. I hope "H ndbok for Debian-administratoren" will be well received.

12 June 2017

Petter Reinholdtsen: Updated sales number for my Free Culture paper editions

It is pleasing to see that the work we put down in publishing new editions of the classic Free Culture book by the founder of the Creative Commons movement, Lawrence Lessig, is still being appreciated. I had a look at the latest sales numbers for the paper edition today. Not too impressive, but happy to see some buyers still exist. All the revenue from the books is sent to the Creative Commons Corporation, and they receive the largest cut if you buy directly from Lulu. Most books are sold via Amazon, with Ingram second and only a small fraction directly from Lulu. The ebook edition is available for free from Github.
Title / languageQuantity
2016 jan-jun2016 jul-dec2017 jan-may
Culture Libre / French 3 6 15
Fri kultur / Norwegian 7 1 0
Free Culture / English 14 27 16
Total 24 34 31
A bit sad to see the low sales number on the Norwegian edition, and a bit surprising the English edition still selling so well. If you would like to translate and publish the book in your native language, I would be happy to help make it happen. Please get in touch.

9 June 2017

Petter Reinholdtsen: Release 0.1.1 of free software archive system Nikita announced

I am very happy to report that the Nikita Noark 5 core project tagged its second release today. The free software solution is an implementation of the Norwegian archive standard Noark 5 used by government offices in Norway. These were the changes in version 0.1.1 since version 0.1.0 (from NEWS.md): If this sound interesting to you, please contact us on IRC (#nikita on irc.freenode.net) or email (nikita-noark mailing list).

7 June 2017

Petter Reinholdtsen: Idea for storing trusted timestamps in a Noark 5 archive

This is a copy of an email I posted to the nikita-noark mailing list. Please follow up there if you would like to discuss this topic. The background is that we are making a free software archive system based on the Norwegian Noark 5 standard for government archives. I've been wondering a bit lately how trusted timestamps could be stored in Noark 5. Trusted timestamps can be used to verify that some information (document/file/checksum/metadata) have not been changed since a specific time in the past. This is useful to verify the integrity of the documents in the archive. Then it occured to me, perhaps the trusted timestamps could be stored as dokument variants (ie dokumentobjekt referered to from dokumentbeskrivelse) with the filename set to the hash it is stamping? Given a "dokumentbeskrivelse" with an associated "dokumentobjekt", a new dokumentobjekt is associated with "dokumentbeskrivelse" with the same attributes as the stamped dokumentobjekt except these attributes: This assume a service following IETF RFC 3161 is used, which specifiy the given MIME type for replies and the .tsr file ending for the content of such trusted timestamp. As far as I can tell from the Noark 5 specifications, it is OK to have several variants/renderings of a dokument attached to a given dokumentbeskrivelse objekt. It might be stretching it a bit to make some of these variants represent crypto-signatures useful for verifying the document integrity instead of representing the dokument itself. Using the source of the service in formatDetaljer allow several timestamping services to be used. This is useful to spread the risk of key compromise over several organisations. It would only be a problem to trust the timestamps if all of the organisations are compromised. The following oneliner on Linux can be used to generate the tsr file. $input is the path to the file to checksum, and $sha256 is the SHA-256 checksum of the file (ie the ".tsr" value mentioned above).
openssl ts -query -data "$inputfile" -cert -sha256 -no_nonce \
    curl -s -H "Content-Type: application/timestamp-query" \
      --data-binary "@-" http://zeitstempel.dfn.de > $sha256.tsr
To verify the timestamp, you first need to download the public key of the trusted timestamp service, for example using this command:
wget -O ca-cert.txt \
  https://pki.pca.dfn.de/global-services-ca/pub/cacert/chain.txt
Note, the public key should be stored alongside the timestamps in the archive to make sure it is also available 100 years from now. It is probably a good idea to standardise how and were to store such public keys, to make it easier to find for those trying to verify documents 100 or 1000 years from now. :) The verification itself is a simple openssl command:
openssl ts -verify -data $inputfile -in $sha256.tsr \
  -CAfile ca-cert.txt -text
Is there any reason this approach would not work? Is it somehow against the Noark 5 specification?

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