Search Results: "Petter Reinholdtsen"

12 September 2022

Petter Reinholdtsen: Time to translate the Bullseye edition of the Debian Administrator's Handbook

(The picture is of the previous edition.) Almost two years after the previous Norwegian Bokm l translation of the "The Debian Administrator's Handbook" was published, a new edition is finally being prepared. The english text is updated, and it is time to start working on the translations. Around 37 percent of the strings have been updated, one way or another, and the translations starting from a complete Debian Buster edition now need to bring their translation up from 63% to 100%. The complete book is licensed using a Creative Commons license, and has been published in several languages over the years. The translations are done by volunteers to bring Linux in their native tongue. The last time I checked, it complete text was available in English, Norwegian Bokm l, German, Indonesian, Brazil Portuguese and Spanish. In addition, work has been started for Arabic (Morocco), Catalan, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, French, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Swedish, Turkish and Vietnamese. The translation is conducted on the hosted weblate project page. Prospective translators are recommeded to subscribe to the translators mailing list and should also check out the instructions for contributors. I am one of the Norwegian Bokm l translators of this book, and we have just started. Your contribution is most welcome. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

16 July 2022

Petter Reinholdtsen: Automatic LinuxCNC servo PID tuning?

While working on a CNC with servo motors controlled by the LinuxCNC PID controller, I recently had to learn how to tune the collection of values that control such mathematical machinery that a PID controller is. It proved to be a lot harder than I hoped, and I still have not succeeded in getting the Z PID controller to successfully defy gravity, nor X and Y to move accurately and reliably. But while climbing up this rather steep learning curve, I discovered that some motor control systems are able to tune their PID controllers. I got the impression from the documentation that LinuxCNC were not. This proved to be not true The LinuxCNC pid component is the recommended PID controller to use. It uses eight constants Pgain, Igain, Dgain, bias, FF0, FF1, FF2 and FF3 to calculate the output value based on current and wanted state, and all of these need to have a sensible value for the controller to behave properly. Note, there are even more values involved, theser are just the most important ones. In my case I need the X, Y and Z axes to follow the requested path with little error. This has proved quite a challenge for someone who have never tuned a PID controller before, but there is at least some help to be found. I discovered that included in LinuxCNC was this old PID component at_pid claiming to have auto tuning capabilities. Sadly it had been neglected since 2011, and could not be used as a plug in replacement for the default pid component. One would have to rewriting the LinuxCNC HAL setup to test at_pid. This was rather sad, when I wanted to quickly test auto tuning to see if it did a better job than me at figuring out good P, I and D values to use. I decided to have a look if the situation could be improved. This involved trying to understand the code and history of the pid and at_pid components. Apparently they had a common ancestor, as code structure, comments and variable names were quite close to each other. Sadly this was not reflected in the git history, making it hard to figure out what really happened. My guess is that the author of at_pid.c took a version of pid.c, rewrote it to follow the structure he wished pid.c to have, then added support for auto tuning and finally got it included into the LinuxCNC repository. The restructuring and lack of early history made it harder to figure out which part of the code were relevant to the auto tuning, and which part of the code needed to be updated to work the same way as the current pid.c implementation. I started by trying to isolate relevant changes in pid.c, and applying them to at_pid.c. My aim was to make sure the at_pid component could replace the pid component with a simple change in the HAL setup loadrt line, without having to "rewire" the rest of the HAL configuration. After a few hours following this approach, I had learned quite a lot about the code structure of both components, while concluding I was heading down the wrong rabbit hole, and should get back to the surface and find a different path. For the second attempt, I decided to throw away all the PID control related part of the original at_pid.c, and instead isolate and lift the auto tuning part of the code and inject it into a copy of pid.c. This ensured compatibility with the current pid component, while adding auto tuning as a run time option. To make it easier to identify the relevant parts in the future, I wrapped all the auto tuning code with '#ifdef AUTO_TUNER'. The end result behave just like the current pid component by default, as that part of the code is identical. The end result entered the LinuxCNC master branch a few days ago. To enable auto tuning, one need to set a few HAL pins in the PID component. The most important ones are tune-effort, tune-mode and tune-start. But lets take a step back, and see what the auto tuning code will do. I do not know the mathematical foundation of the at_pid algorithm, but from observation I can tell that the algorithm will, when enabled, produce a square wave pattern centered around the bias value on the output pin of the PID controller. This can be seen using the HAL Scope provided by LinuxCNC. In my case, this is translated into voltage (+-10V) sent to the motor controller, which in turn is translated into motor speed. So at_pid will ask the motor to move the axis back and forth. The number of cycles in the pattern is controlled by the tune-cycles pin, and the extremes of the wave pattern is controlled by the tune-effort pin. Of course, trying to change the direction of a physical object instantly (as in going directly from a positive voltage to the equivalent negative voltage) do not change velocity instantly, and it take some time for the object to slow down and move in the opposite direction. This result in a more smooth movement wave form, as the axis in question were vibrating back and forth. When the axis reached the target speed in the opposing direction, the auto tuner change direction again. After several of these changes, the average time delay between the 'peaks' and 'valleys' of this movement graph is then used to calculate proposed values for Pgain, Igain and Dgain, and insert them into the HAL model to use by the pid controller. The auto tuned settings are not great, but htye work a lot better than the values I had been able to cook up on my own, at least for the horizontal X and Y axis. But I had to use very small tune-effort values, as my motor controllers error out if the voltage change too quickly. I've been less lucky with the Z axis, which is moving a heavy object up and down, and seem to confuse the algorithm. The Z axis movement became a lot better when I introduced a bias value to counter the gravitational drag, but I will have to work a lot more on the Z axis PID values. Armed with this knowledge, it is time to look at how to do the tuning. Lets say the HAL configuration in question load the PID component for X, Y and Z like this:
loadrt pid names=pid.x,pid.y,pid.z
Armed with the new and improved at_pid component, the new line will look like this:
loadrt at_pid names=pid.x,pid.y,pid.z
The rest of the HAL setup can stay the same. This work because the components are referenced by name. If the component had used count=3 instead, all use of pid.# had to be changed to at_pid.#. To start tuning the X axis, move the axis to the middle of its range, to make sure it do not hit anything when it start moving back and forth. Next, set the tune-effort to a low number in the output range. I used 0.1 as my initial value. Next, assign 1 to the tune-mode value. Note, this will disable the pid controlling part and feed 0 to the output pin, which in my case initially caused a lot of drift. In my case it proved to be a good idea with X and Y to tune the motor driver to make sure 0 voltage stopped the motor rotation. On the other hand, for the Z axis this proved to be a bad idea, so it will depend on your setup. It might help to set the bias value to a output value that reduce or eliminate the axis drift. Finally, after setting tune-mode, set tune-start to 1 to activate the auto tuning. If all go well, your axis will vibrate for a few seconds and when it is done, new values for Pgain, Igain and Dgain will be active. To test them, change tune-mode back to 0. Note that this might cause the machine to suddenly jerk as it bring the axis back to its commanded position, which it might have drifted away from during tuning. To summarize with some halcmd lines:
setp pid.x.tune-effort 0.1
setp pid.x.tune-mode 1
setp pid.x.tune-start 1
# wait for the tuning to complete
setp pid.x.tune-mode 0
After doing this task quite a few times while trying to figure out how to properly tune the PID controllers on the machine in, I decided to figure out if this process could be automated, and wrote a script to do the entire tuning process from power on. The end result will ensure the machine is powered on and ready to run, home all axis if it is not already done, check that the extra tuning pins are available, move the axis to its mid point, run the auto tuning and re-enable the pid controller when it is done. It can be run several times. Check out the run-auto-pid-tuner script on github if you want to learn how it is done. My hope is that this little adventure can inspire someone who know more about motor PID controller tuning can implement even better algorithms for automatic PID tuning in LinuxCNC, making life easier for both me and all the others that want to use LinuxCNC but lack the in depth knowledge needed to tune PID controllers well. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

20 June 2022

Petter Reinholdtsen: My free software activity of late (2022)

I guess it is time to bring some light on the various free software and open culture activities and projects I have worked on or been involved in the last year and a half. First, lets mention the book releases I managed to publish. The Cory Doctorow book "Hvordan knuse overv kningskapitalismen" argue that it is not the magic machine learning of the big technology companies that causes the surveillance capitalism to thrive, it is the lack of trust busting to enforce existing anti-monopoly laws. I also published a family of dictionaries for machinists, one sorted on the English words, one sorted on the Norwegian and the last sorted on the North S mi words. A bit on the back burner but not forgotten is the Debian Administrators Handbook, where a new edition is being worked on. I have not spent as much time as I want to help bring it to completion, but hope I will get more spare time to look at it before the end of the year. With my Debian had I have spent time on several projects, both updating existing packages, helping to bring in new packages and working with upstream projects to try to get them ready to go into Debian. The list is rather long, and I will only mention my own isenkram, openmotor, vlc bittorrent plugin, xprintidle, norwegian letter style for latex, bs1770gain, and recordmydesktop. In addition to these I have sponsored several packages into Debian, like audmes. The last year I have looked at several infrastructure projects for collecting meter data and video surveillance recordings. This include several ONVIF related tools like onvifviewer and zoneminder as well as rtl-433, wmbusmeters and rtl-wmbus. In parallel with this I have looked at fabrication related free software solutions like pycam and LinuxCNC. The latter recently gained improved translation support using po4a and weblate, which was a harder nut to crack that I had anticipated when I started. Several hours have been spent translating free software to Norwegian Bokm l on the Weblate hosted service. Do not have a complete list, but you will find my contributions in at least gnucash, minetest and po4a. I also spent quite some time on the Norwegian archiving specification Noark 5, and its companion project Nikita implementing the API specification for Noark 5. Recently I have been looking into free software tools to do company accounting here in Norway., which present an interesting mix between law, rules, regulations, format specifications and API interfaces. I guess I should also mention the Norwegian community driven government interfacing projects Mimes Br nn and Fiksgatami, which have ended up in a kind of limbo while the future of the projects is being worked out. These are just a few of the projects I have been involved it, and would like to give more visibility. I'll stop here to avoid delaying this post. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

3 June 2022

Petter Reinholdtsen: LinuxCNC translators life just got a bit easier

Back in oktober last year, when I started looking at the LinuxCNC system, I proposed to change the documentation build system make life easier for translators. The original system consisted of independently written documentation files for each language, with no automated way to track changes done in other translations and no help for the translators to know how much was left to translated. By using the po4a system to generate POT and PO files from the English documentation, this can be improved. A small team of LinuxCNC contributors got together and today our labour finally payed off. Since a few hours ago, it is now possible to translate the LinuxCNC documentation on Weblate, alongside the program itself. The effort to migrate the documentation to use po4a has been both slow and frustrating. I am very happy we finally made it. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

20 April 2022

Petter Reinholdtsen: geteltorito make CD firmware upgrades a breeze

Recently I wanted to upgrade the firmware of my thinkpad, and located the firmware download page from Lenovo (which annoyingly do not allow access via Tor, forcing me to hand them more personal information that I would like). The download from Lenovo is a bootable ISO image, which is a bit of a problem when all I got available is a USB memory stick. I tried booting the ISO as a USB stick, but this did not work. But genisoimage came to the rescue. The geteltorito program in the genisoimage binary package is able to convert the bootable ISO image to a bootable USB stick using a simple command line recipe, which I then can write to the most recently inserted USB stick:
geteltorito -o usbstick.img lenovo-firmware.iso
sudo dd bs=10M if=usbstick.img of=$(ls -tr /dev/sd? tail -1)
This USB stick booted the firmware upgrader just fine, and in a few minutes my machine had the latest and greatest BIOS firmware in place.

Petter Reinholdtsen: genisoimage make CD firmware upgrades a breeze

Recently I wanted to upgrade the firmware of my thinkpad, and located the firmware download page from Lenovo (which annoyingly do not allow access via Tor, forcing me to hand them more personal information that I would like). The download from Lenovo is a bootable ISO image, which is a bit of a problem when all I got available is a USB memory stick. I tried booting the ISO as a USB stick, but this did not work. But genisoimage came to the rescue. The geteltorito program in the genisoimage package is able to convert the bootable ISO image to a bootable USB stick using a simple command line recipe, which I then can write to the most recently inserted USB stick:
geteltorito -o usbstick.img lenovo-firmware.iso
sudo dd bs=10M if=usbstick.img of=$(ls -tr /dev/sd? tail -1)
This USB stick booted the firmware upgrader just fine, and in a few minutes my machine had the latest and greatest BIOS firmware in place.

16 April 2022

Petter Reinholdtsen: Playing and encoding AV1 in Debian Bullseye

Inspired by the recent news of AV1 hardware encoding support from Intel, I decided to look into the state of AV1 on Linux today. AV1 is a free and open standard as defined by Digistan without any royalty payment requirement, unlike its much used competitor encoding H.264. While looking, I came across an 5 year old question on askubuntu.com which in turn inspired me to check out how things are in Debian Stable regarding AV1. The test file listed in the question (askubuntu_test_aom.mp4) did not exist any more, so I tracked down a different set of test files on av1.webmfiles.org to test them with the various video tools I had installed on my machine. I was happy to discover that AV1 decoding and playback worked with almost every tool I tested:
mediainfo ok
dragonplayer ok
ffmpeg / ffplay ok
gnome-mplayer fail
mplayer ok
mpv ok
parole ok
vlc ok
firefox ok
chromium ok
AV1 encoding is available in Debian Stable from the aom-tools version 1.0.0.errata1-3 package, using the aomenc tool. The encoding using the package in Debian Stable is quite slow, with the frame rate for my 10 second test video at around 0.25 fps. My 10 second video test took 16 minutes and 11 seconds on my test machine. I tested by first running ffmpeg and then aomenc using the recipe provided by the askubuntu recipe above. I had to remove the '--row-mt=1' option, as it was not supported in my 1.0.0 version. The encoding only used a single thread, according to top.
ffmpeg -i some-old-video.ogv -t 10 -pix_fmt yuv420p video.y4m
aomenc --fps=24/1 -u 0 --codec=av1 --target-bitrate=1000 \
  --lag-in-frames=25 --auto-alt-ref=1 -t 24 --cpu-used=8 \
  --tile-columns=2 --tile-rows=2 -o output.webm video.y4m
As version 1.0.0 currently have several unsolved security issues in Debian Stable, and to see if the recent backport provided in Debian is any quicker, I ran apt -t bullseye-backports install aom-tools to fetch the backported version and re-encoded the video using the latest version. This time the '--row-mt=1' option worked, and the encoding was done in 46 seconds with a frame rate of around 5.22 fps. This time it seem to be using all my four cores to encode. Encoding speed is still too low for streaming and real time, which would require frame rates above 25 fps, but might be good enough for offline encoding. I am very happy to see AV1 playback working so well with the default tools in Debian Stable. I hope the encoding situation improve too, allowing even a slow old computer like my 10 year old laptop to be used for encoding. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

12 March 2022

Petter Reinholdtsen: Publish Hargassner wood chip boiler state to MQTT

Recently I had a look at a Hargassner wood chip boiler, and what kind of free software can be used to monitor and control it. The boiler can be connected to some cloud service via what the producer call an Internet Gateway, which seem to be a computer connecting to the boiler and passing the information gathered to the cloud. I discovered the boiler controller got an IP address on the local network and listen on TCP port 23 to provide status information as a text line of numbers. It also provide a HTTP server listening on port 80, but I have not yet figured out what it can do beside return an error code. If I am to believe various free software implementations talking to such boiler, the interpretation of the line of numbers differ between type of boiler and software version on the boiler. By comparing the list of numbers on the front panel of the boiler with the numbers returned via TCP, I have been able to figure out several of the numbers, but there are a lot left to understand. I've located several temperature measurements and hours running values, as well as oxygen measurements and counters. I decided to write a simple parser in Python for the values I figured out so far, and a simple MQTT injector publishing both the interpreted and the unknown values on a MQTT bus to make collecting and graphing simpler. The end result is available from the hargassner2mqtt project page on gitlab. I very much welcome patches extending the parser to understand more values, boiler types and software versions. I do not really expect very few free software developers got their hands on such unit to experiment, but it would be fun if others too find this project useful. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

2 March 2022

Petter Reinholdtsen: Run your industrial metal working machine using Debian?

After many months of hard work by the good people involved in LinuxCNC, the system was accepted Sunday into Debian. Once it was available from Debian, I was surprised to discover from its popularity-contest numbers that people have been reporting its use since 2012. Its project site might be a good place to check out, but sadly is not working when visiting via Tor. But what is LinuxCNC, you are probably wondering? Perhaps a Wikipedia quote is in place?
"LinuxCNC is a software system for numerical control of machines such as milling machines, lathes, plasma cutters, routers, cutting machines, robots and hexapods. It can control up to 9 axes or joints of a CNC machine using G-code (RS-274NGC) as input. It has several GUIs suited to specific kinds of usage (touch screen, interactive development)."
It can even control 3D printers. And even though the Wikipedia page indicate that it can only work with hard real time kernel features, it can also work with the user space soft real time features provided by the Debian kernel. The source code is available from Github. The last few months I've been involved in the translation setup for the program and documentation. Translators are most welcome to join the effort using Weblate. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

Petter Reinholdtsen: Run your industrial metal working machine using Debian?

After many months of hard work by the good people involved in LinuxCNC, the system was accepted Sunday into Debian. Once it was available from Debian, I was surprised to discover from its popularity-contest numbers that people have been reporting its use since 2012. Its project site might be a good place to check out, but sadly is not working when visiting via Tor. But what is LinuxCNC, you are probably wondering? Perhaps a Wikipedia quote is in place?
"LinuxCNC is a software system for numerical control of machines such as milling machines, lathes, plasma cutters, routers, cutting machines, robots and hexapods. It can control up to 9 axes or joints of a CNC machine using G-code (RS-274NGC) as input. It has several GUIs suited to specific kinds of usage (touch screen, interactive development)."
It can even control 3D printers. And even though the Wikipedia page indicate that it can only work with hard real time kernel features, it can also work with the user space soft real time features provided by the Debian kernel. The source code is available from Github. The last few months I've been involved in the translation setup for the program and documentation. Translators are most welcome to join the effort using Weblate. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

14 February 2022

Petter Reinholdtsen: Updated vlc bittorrent plugin in Debian (version 2.14)

I am very happy to report that a new version of the VLC bittorrent plugin was just uploaded into debian. The changes since last time is mostly code clean in the download code. The package is currently in Debian unstable, but should be available in Debian testing son. To test it, simply install it like this:
apt install vlc-plugin-bittorrent
After it is installed, you can try to use it to play a file downloaded live via bittorrent like this:
vlc https://archive.org/download/Glass_201703/Glass_201703_archive.torrent
It can also use magnet links and local .torrent files like the ones provided by the Internet Archive. Another example is the Love Nest Buster Keaton movie, where one can click on the 'Torrent' link to get going. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

Petter Reinholdtsen: Updated vlc bittorrent plugin in Debian (version 2.14)

I am very happy to report that a new version of the VLC bittorrent plugin was just uploaded into debian. The changes since last time is mostly code clean in the download code. The package is currently in Debian unstable, but should be available in Debian testing son. To test it, simply install it like this:
apt install vlc-plugin-bittorrent
After it is installed, you can try to use it to play a file downloaded live via bittorrent like this:
vlc https://archive.org/download/Glass_201703/Glass_201703_archive.torrent
It can also use magnet links and local .torrent files like the ones provided by the Internet Archive. Another example is the Love Nest Buster Keaton movie, where one can click on the 'Torrent' link to get going. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

3 December 2021

Petter Reinholdtsen: A Brazilian Portuguese translation of the book Made with Creative Commons

A few days ago, a productive translator started working on a new translation of the Made with Creative Commons book for Brazilian Portuguese. The translation take place on the Weblate web based translation system. Once the translation is complete and proof read, we can publish it on paper as well as in PDF, ePub and HTML format. The translation is already 16% complete, and if more people get involved I am conviced it can very quickly reach 100%. If you are interested in helping out with this or other translations of the Made with Creative Commons book, start translating on Weblate. There are partial translations available in Azerbaijani, Bengali, Brazilian Portuguese, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Polish, Simplified Chinese, Swedish, Thai and Ukrainian. The git repository for the book contain all source files needed to build the book for yourself. HTML editions to help with proof reading is also available. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

24 October 2021

Petter Reinholdtsen: Debian still an excellent choice for Lego builders

The Debian Lego team saw a lot of activity the last few weeks. All the packages under the team umbrella has been updated to fix packaging, lintian issues and BTS reports. In addition, a new and inspiring team member appeared on both the debian-lego-team Team mailing list and IRC channel #debian-lego. If you are interested in Lego CAD design and LEGO Minestorms programming, check out the team wiki page to see what Debian can offer the Lego enthusiast. Patches has been sent upstream, causing new upstream releases, one even the first one in more than ten years, and old upstreams was released with new ones. There are still a lot of work left, and the team welcome more members to help us make sure Debian is the Linux distribution of choice for Lego builders. If you want to contribute, join us in the IRC channel and become part of the team on Salsa. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

4 August 2021

Petter Reinholdtsen: Mechanic's words in five languages, English, Norwegian and Northern S mi editions

Almost thirty years ago, some forward looking teachers at Samisk videreg ende skole og reindriftsskole teaching metal work and Northern S mi, decided to create a list of words used in Northern S mi metal work. After almost ten years this resulted in a dictionary database, published as the book "Mekanihkk rs nit : Mekanikerord = Mekaanisen alan sanasto = Mechanic's words" in 1999. The story of this work is available from the pen of Svein Lund, one of the leading actors behind this effort. They even got the dictionary approved by the S mi Language Council as the recommended metal work words to use. Fast forward twenty years, I came across this work when I recently became interested in metal work, and started watching educational and funny videos on the topic, like the ones from mrpete222 and This Old Tony. But they all talk English, but I wanted to know what the tools and techniques they used were called in Norwegian. Trying to track down a good dictionary from English to Norwegian, after much searching, I came across the database of words created almost thirty years ago, with translations into English, Norwegian, Northern S mi, Swedish and Finnish. This gave me a lot of the Norwegian phrases I had been looking for. To make it easier for the next person trying to track down a good Norwegian dictionary for the metal worker, and because I knew the person behind the database from my Skolelinux / Debian Edu days, I decided to ask if the database could be released to the public without any usage limitations, in other words as a Creative Commons licensed data set. And happily, after consulting with the S mi Parliament of Norway, the database is now available with the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license from my gitlab repository. The dictionary entries look slightly different, depending on the language in focus. This is the same entry in the different editions. English
lathe
dreiebenk (nb) v rve, v rvenbea ka, jorahanbea ka, v tnanbea ka (se) svarv (sv) sorvi (fi)
Norwegian
dreiebenk
lathe (en) v rve, v rvenbea ka, jorahanbea ka, v tnanbea ka (se) svarv (sv) sorvi (fi)
(nb): sponskj rande bearbeidingsmaskin der ein med skj reverkt y lausgj r spon fr eit roterande arbetsstykke
Northern S mi
v rve, v rvenbea ka, jorahanbea ka, v tnanbea ka
dreiebenk (nb) lathe (en) svarv (sv) sorvi (fi)
(se): ma iidna mainna uohpp vuolahasaid jorri bargo vdnasis
(nb): sponskj rande bearbeidingsmaskin der ein med skj reverkt y lausgj r spon fr eit roterande arbetsstykke
The database included term description in both Norwegian and Northern S mi, but not English. Because of this, the Northern S mi edition include both descriptions, the Norwegian edition include the Norwegian description and the English edition lack a descripiton. Once the database was available without any usage restrictions, and armed with my experience in publishing books, I decided to publish a Norwegian/English dictionary as a book using the database, to make the data set available also on paper and as an ebook. Further into the project, it occurred to me that I could just as easily make an English dictionary, and talking to Svein and concluding that it was within reach, I decided to make a Northern S mi dictionary too. Thus I suddenly find myself publishing a Northern S mi dictionary, even though I do not understand the language myself. I hope it will be well received, and can help revive the impressive work done almost thirty years ago to document the vocabulary of metal workers. If I get some help, I might even extend it with some of the words I find missing, like collet, rotary broach, carbide, knurler, arbor press and others. But the first edition build from a lightly edited version of the original database, with no new entries added. If you would like to check it out, visit my list of published books and consider buying a paper or ebook copy from lulu.com. The paper edition is only available in hardcover to increase its durability in the workshop. I am very happy to report that in the process, and thanks to help from both Svein Lund and B rre Gaup who understand the language, the docbook tools I use to create books, dblatex and docbook-xsl, now include support for Northern S mi. Before I started, these lacked the needed locale settings for this language, but now the patches are included upstream. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

5 July 2021

Petter Reinholdtsen: Six complete translations of The Debian Administrator's Handbook for Buster

I am happy observe that the The Debian Administrator's Handbook is available in six languages now. I am not sure which one of these are completely proof read, but the complete book is available in these languages: This is the list of languages more than 70% complete, in other words with not too much left to do: I wonder how long it will take to bring these to 100%. Then there is the list of languages about halfway done: Several are on to a good start: Finally, there are the ones just getting started: If you want to help provide a Debian instruction book in your own language, visit Weblate to contribute to the translations. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

10 June 2021

Petter Reinholdtsen: Nikita version 0.6 released - free software archive API server

I am very pleased to be able to share with you the announcement of a new version of the archiving system Nikita published by its lead developer Thomas S dring:
It is with great pleasure that we can announce a new release of nikita. Version 0.6 (https://gitlab.com/OsloMet-ABI/nikita-noark5-core). This release makes new record keeping functionality available. This really is a maturity release. Both in terms of functionality but also code. Considerable effort has gone into refactoring the codebase and simplifying the code. Notable changes for this release include:
  • Significantly improved OData parsing
  • Support for business specific metadata and national identifiers
  • Continued implementation of domain model and endpoints
  • Improved testing
  • Ability to export and import from arkivstruktur.xml
We are currently in the process of reaching an agreement with an archive institution to publish their picture archive using nikita with business specific metadata and we hope that we can share this with you soon. This is an interesting project as it allows the organisation to bring an older picture archive back to life while using the original metadata values stored as business specific metadata. Combined with OData means the scope and use of the archive is significantly increased and will showcase both the flexibility and power of Noark. I really think we are approaching a version 1.0 of nikita, even though there is still a lot of work to be done. The notable work at the moment is to implement access-control and full text indexing of documents. My sincere thanks to everyone who has contributed to this release! - Thomas Release 0.6 2021-06-10 (d1ba5fc7e8bad0cfdce45ac20354b19d10ebbc7b)
  • Refactor metadata entity search
  • Remove redundant security configuration
  • Make OpenAPI documentation work
  • Change database structure / inheritance model to a more sensible approach
  • Make it possible to move entities around the fonds structure
  • Implemented a number of missing endpoints
  • Make sure yml files are in sync
  • Implemented/finalised storing and use of
    • Business Specific Metadata
    • Norwegian National Identifiers
    • Cross Reference
    • Keyword
    • StorageLocation
    • Author
    • Screening for relevant objects
    • ChangeLog
    • EventLog
  • Make generation of updated docker image part of successful CI pipeline
  • Implement pagination for all list requests
    • Refactor code to support lists
    • Refactor code for readability
    • Standardise the controller/service code
  • Finalise File->CaseFile expansion and Record->registryEntry/recordNote expansion
  • Improved Continuous Integration (CI) approach via gitlab
  • Changed conversion approach to generate tagged PDF documents
  • Updated dependencies
    • For security reasons
    • Brought codebase to spring-boot version 2.5.0
    • Remove import of necessary dependencies
    • Remove non-used metrics classes
  • Added new analysis to CI including
  • Implemented storing of Keyword
  • Implemented storing of Screening and ScreeningMetadata
  • Improved OData support
    • Better support for inheritance in queries where applicable
    • Brought in more OData tests
    • Improved OData/hibernate understanding of queries
    • Implement $count, $orderby
    • Finalise $top and $skip
    • Make sure & is used between query parameters
  • Improved Testing in codebase
    • A new approach for integration tests to make test more readable
    • Introduce tests in parallel with code development for TDD approach
    • Remove test that required particular access to storage
  • Implement case-handling process from received email to case-handler
    • Develop required GUI elements (digital postroom from email)
    • Introduced leader, quality control and postroom roles
  • Make PUT requests return 200 OK not 201 CREATED
  • Make DELETE requests return 204 NO CONTENT not 200 OK
  • Replaced 'oppdatert*' with 'endret*' everywhere to match latest spec
  • Upgrade Gitlab CI to use python > 3 for CI scripts
  • Bug fixes
    • Fix missing ALLOW
    • Fix reading of objects from jar file during start-up
    • Reduce the number of warnings in the codebase
    • Fix delete problems
    • Make better use of cascade for "leaf" objects
    • Add missing annotations where relevant
    • Remove the use of ETAG for delete
    • Fix missing/wrong/broken rels discovered by runtest
    • Drop unofficial convertFil (konverterFil) end point
    • Fix regex problem for dateTime
    • Fix multiple static analysis issues discovered by coverity
    • Fix proxy problem when looking for object class names
    • Add many missing translated Norwegian to English (internal) attribute/entity names
    • Change UUID generation approach to allow code also set a value
    • Fix problem with Part/PartParson
    • Fix problem with empty OData search results
    • Fix metadata entity domain problem
  • General Improvements
    • Makes future refactoring easier as coupling is reduced
    • Allow some constant variables to be set from property file
    • Refactor code to make reflection work better across codebase
    • Reduce the number of @Service layer classes used in @Controller classes
    • Be more consistent on naming of similar variable types
    • Start printing rels/href if they are applicable
    • Cleaner / standardised approach to deleting objects
    • Avoid concatenation when using StringBuilder
    • Consolidate code to avoid duplication
    • Tidy formatting for a more consistent reading style across similar class files
    • Make throw a log.error message not an log.info message
    • Make throw print the log value rather than printing in multiple places
    • Add some missing pronom codes
    • Fix time formatting issue in Gitlab CI
    • Remove stale / unused code
    • Use only UUID datatype rather than combination String/UUID for systemID
    • Mark variables final and @NotNull where relevant to indicate intention
  • Change Date values to DateTime to maintain compliance with Noark 5 standard
  • Domain model improvements using Hypersistence Optimizer
    • Move @Transactional from class to methods to avoid borrowing the JDBC Connection unnecessarily
    • Fix OneToOne performance issues
    • Fix ManyToMany performance issues
    • Add missing bidirectional synchronization support
    • Fix ManyToMany performance issue
  • Make List
  • and Set
  • use final-keyword to avoid potential problems during update operations
  • Changed internal URLs, replaced "hateoas-api" with "api".
  • Implemented storing of Precedence.
  • Corrected handling of screening.
  • Corrected _links collection returned for list of mixed entity types to match the specific entity.
  • Improved several internal structures.
If free and open standardized archiving API sound interesting to you, please contact us on IRC (#nikita on irc.oftc.net) or email (nikita-noark mailing list). As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

1 May 2021

Petter Reinholdtsen: VLC bittorrent plugin in Bullseye, saved by the bell?

Yesterday morning I got a warning call from the Debian quality control system that the VLC bittorrent plugin was due to be removed because of a release critical bug in one of its dependencies. As you might remember, this plugin make VLC able to stream videos directly from a bittorrent source using both torrent files and magnet links, similar to using a HTTP source. I believe such protocol support is a vital feature in VLC, allowing efficient streaming from sources such at the almost 7 million movies in the Internet Archive. The dependency was the unmaintained libtorrent-rasterbar package, and the bug in question blocked its python library from working properly. As I did not want Bullseye to release without bittorrent support in VLC, I set out to check out the status, and track down a fix for the problem. Luckily the issue had already been identified and fixed upstream, providing everything needed. All I needed to do was to fetch the Debian git repository, extract and trim the patch from upstream and apply it to the Debian package for upload. The fixed library was uploaded yesterday evening. But that is not enough to get it into Bullseye, as Debian is currently in package freeze to prepare for a new next stable release. Only non-critical packages with autopkgtest setup included, in other words able to validate automatically that the package is working, are allowed to migrate automatically into the next release at this stage. And the unmaintained libtorrent-rasterbar lack such testing, and thus needed a manual override. I am happy to report that such manual override was approved a few minutes ago, thus increasing significantly the chance of VLC bittorrent streaming being available out of the box also for Debian/Buster users. A bit too close shave for my liking, as the Bullseye release is most likely just a few days away, and this did feel like the package was saved by the bell. I am so glad the warning email showed up in time for me to handle the issue, and a big thanks go to the Debian Release team for the quick feedback on #debian-release and their swift unblocking. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

27 February 2021

Petter Reinholdtsen: Updated Valutakrambod, now also with information from NBX

I have neglected the Valutakrambod library for a while, but decided this weekend to give it a face lift. I fixed a few minor glitches in several of the service drivers, where the API had changed since I last looked at the code. I also added support for fetching the order book from the newcomer Norwegian Bitcoin Exchange. I alsod decided to migrate the project from github to gitlab in the process. If you want a python library for talking to various currency exchanges, check out code for valutakrambod. This is what the output from 'bin/btc-rates-curses -c' looked like a few minutes ago:
           Name Pair           Bid         Ask Spread Ftcd    Age   Freq
       Bitfinex BTCEUR  39229.0000  39246.0000   0.0%   44     44    nan
        Bitmynt BTCEUR  39071.0000  41048.9000   4.8%   43     74    nan
         Bitpay BTCEUR  39326.7000         nan   nan%   39    nan    nan
       Bitstamp BTCEUR  39398.7900  39417.3200   0.0%    0      0      1
           Bl3p BTCEUR  39158.7800  39581.9000   1.1%    0    nan      3
       Coinbase BTCEUR  39197.3100  39621.9300   1.1%   38    nan    nan
         Kraken+BTCEUR  39432.9000  39433.0000   0.0%    0      0      0
        Paymium BTCEUR  39437.2100  39499.9300   0.2%    0   2264    nan
        Bitmynt BTCNOK 409750.9600 420516.8500   2.6%   43     74    nan
         Bitpay BTCNOK 410332.4000         nan   nan%   39    nan    nan
       Coinbase BTCNOK 408675.7300 412813.7900   1.0%   38    nan    nan
        MiraiEx BTCNOK 412174.1800 418396.1500   1.5%   34    nan    nan
            NBX BTCNOK 405835.9000 408921.4300   0.8%   33    nan    nan
       Bitfinex BTCUSD  47341.0000  47355.0000   0.0%   44     53    nan
         Bitpay BTCUSD  47388.5100         nan   nan%   39    nan    nan
       Coinbase BTCUSD  47153.6500  47651.3700   1.0%   37    nan    nan
         Gemini BTCUSD  47416.0900  47439.0500   0.0%   36    336    nan
         Hitbtc BTCUSD  47429.9900  47386.7400  -0.1%    0      0      0
         Kraken+BTCUSD  47401.7000  47401.8000   0.0%    0      0      0
  Exchangerates EURNOK     10.4012     10.4012   0.0%   38  76236    nan
     Norgesbank EURNOK     10.4012     10.4012   0.0%   31  76236    nan
       Bitstamp EURUSD      1.2030      1.2045   0.1%    2      2      1
  Exchangerates EURUSD      1.2121      1.2121   0.0%   38  76236    nan
     Norgesbank USDNOK      8.5811      8.5811   0.0%   31  76236    nan
Yes, I notice the negative spread on Hitbtc. Either I fail to understand their Websocket API or they are sending bogus data. I've seen the same with Kraken, and suspect there is something wrong with the data they send. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

12 January 2021

Petter Reinholdtsen: Latest Jami back in Debian Testing, and scriptable using dbus

After a lot of hard work by its maintainer Alexandre Viau and others, the decentralized communication platform Jami (earlier known as Ring), managed to get its latest version into Debian Testing. Several of its dependencies has caused build and propagation problems, which all seem to be solved now. In addition to the fact that Jami is decentralized, similar to how bittorrent is decentralized, I first of all like how it is not connected to external IDs like phone numbers. This allow me to set up computers to send me notifications using Jami without having to find get a phone number for each computer. Automatic notification via Jami is also made trivial thanks to the provided client side API (as a DBus service). Here is my bourne shell script demonstrating how to let any system send a message to any Jami address. It will create a new identity before sending the message, if no Jami identity exist already:
#!/bin/sh
#
# Usage: $0  
#
# Send  to , create local jami account if
# missing.
#
# License: GPL v2 or later at your choice
# Author: Petter Reinholdtsen
if [ -z "$HOME" ] ; then
    echo "error: missing \$HOME, required for dbus to work"
    exit 1
fi
# First, get dbus running if not already running
DBUSLAUNCH=/usr/bin/dbus-launch
PIDFILE=/run/asterisk/dbus-session.pid
if [ -e $PIDFILE ] ; then
    . $PIDFILE
    if ! kill -0 $DBUS_SESSION_BUS_PID 2>/dev/null ; then
        unset DBUS_SESSION_BUS_ADDRESS
    fi
fi
if [ -z "$DBUS_SESSION_BUS_ADDRESS" ] && [ -x "$DBUSLAUNCH" ]; then
    DBUS_SESSION_BUS_ADDRESS="unix:path=$HOME/.dbus"
    dbus-daemon --session --address="$DBUS_SESSION_BUS_ADDRESS" --nofork --nopidfile --syslog-only < /dev/null > /dev/null 2>&1 3>&1 &
    DBUS_SESSION_BUS_PID=$!
    (
        echo DBUS_SESSION_BUS_PID=$DBUS_SESSION_BUS_PID
        echo DBUS_SESSION_BUS_ADDRESS=\""$DBUS_SESSION_BUS_ADDRESS"\"
        echo export DBUS_SESSION_BUS_ADDRESS
    ) > $PIDFILE
    . $PIDFILE
fi &
dringop()  
    part="$1"; shift
    op="$1"; shift
    dbus-send --session \
        --dest="cx.ring.Ring" /cx/ring/Ring/$part cx.ring.Ring.$part.$op $*
 
dringopreply()  
    part="$1"; shift
    op="$1"; shift
    dbus-send --session --print-reply \
        --dest="cx.ring.Ring" /cx/ring/Ring/$part cx.ring.Ring.$part.$op $*
 
firstaccount()  
    dringopreply ConfigurationManager getAccountList   \
      grep string   awk -F'"' ' print $2 '   head -n 1
 
account=$(firstaccount)
if [ -z "$account" ] ; then
    echo "Missing local account, trying to create it"
    dringop ConfigurationManager addAccount \
      dict:string:string:"Account.type","RING","Account.videoEnabled","false"
    account=$(firstaccount)
    if [ -z "$account" ] ; then
        echo "unable to create local account"
        exit 1
    fi
fi
# Not using dringopreply to ensure $2 can contain spaces
dbus-send --print-reply --session \
  --dest=cx.ring.Ring \
  /cx/ring/Ring/ConfigurationManager \
  cx.ring.Ring.ConfigurationManager.sendTextMessage \
  string:"$account" string:"$1" \
  dict:string:string:"text/plain","$2" 
If you want to check it out yourself, visit the the Jami system project page to learn more, and install the latest Jami client from Debian Unstable or Testing. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b.

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