Search Results: "Martin Michlmayr"

31 August 2021

Benjamin Mako Hill: Returning to DebConf

I first started using Debian sometime in the mid 90s and started contributing as a developer and package maintainer more than two decades years ago. My first very first scholarly publication, collaborative work led by Martin Michlmayr that I did when I was still an undergrad at Hampshire College, was about quality and the reliance on individuals in Debian. To this day, many of my closest friends are people I first met through Debian. I met many of them at Debian s annual conference DebConf. Given my strong connections to Debian, I find it somewhat surprising that although all of my academic research has focused on peer production, free culture, and free software, I haven t actually published any Debian related research since that first paper with Martin in 2003! So it felt like coming full circle when, several days ago, I was able to sit in the virtual DebConf audience and watch two of my graduate student advisees Kaylea Champion and Wm Salt Hale present their research about Debian at DebConf21. Salt presented his masters thesis work which tried to understand the social dynamics behind organizational resilience among free software projects. Kaylea presented her work on a new technique she developed to identifying at risk software packages that are lower quality than we might hope given their popularity (you can read more about Kaylea s project in our blog post from earlier this year). If you missed either presentation, check out the blog post my research collective put up or watch the videos below. If you want to hear about new work we re doing including work on Debian you should follow our research group blog, and/or follow or engage with us in the Fediverse (@communitydata@social.coop), or on Twitter (@comdatasci). And if you re interested in joining us perhaps to do more research on FLOSS and/or Debian and/or a graduate degree of your own? please be in touch with me directly!
Wm Salt Hale s presentation plus Q&A. (WebM available)
Kaylea Champion s presentation plus Q&A. (WebM available)

28 April 2021

Martin Michlmayr: Research on FOSS foundations

I worked on research on FOSS foundations and published two reports: Growing Open Source Projects with a Stable Foundation This primer covers non-technical aspects that the majority of projects will have to consider at some point. It also explains how FOSS foundations can help projects grow and succeed. This primer explains: You can download Growing Open Source Projects with a Stable Foundation. Research report The research report describes the findings of the research and aims to help understand the operations and challenges FOSS foundations face. This report covers topics such as: You can download the research report. Acknowledgments This research was sponsored by Ford Foundation and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. The research was part of their Critical Digital Infrastructure Research initiative, which investigates the role of open source in digital infrastructure.

15 April 2021

Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.6 released

I released version 2.6 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter. Here are the changes in 2.6: Thanks to Alexander Baier, Daniele Nicolodi, and GitHub users bratekarate, faaafo and mefromthepast for various bug reports and other input. Thanks to Dennis Lee for adding a Dockerfile and to Vinod Kurup for fixing a bug. Thanks to Stefano Zacchiroli for testing. You can get ledger2beancount from GitHub.

9 January 2021

Jonathan McDowell: Free Software Activities for 2020

As a reader of Planet Debian I see a bunch of updates at the start of each month about what people are up to in terms of their Free Software activities. I m not generally active enough in the Free Software world to justify a monthly report, but I did a report of my Free Software Activities for 2019 and thought I d do another for 2020. I ended up not doing as much as last year; I put a lot of that down to fatigue about the state of the world and generally not wanting to spend time on the computer at the end of the working day.

Conferences 2020 was unsurprisingly not a great year for conference attendance. I was fortunate enough to make it to FOSDEM and CopyleftConf 2020 - I didn t speak at either, but had plenty of interesting hallway track conversations as well as seeing some good talks. I hadn t been planning to attend DebConf20 due to time constraints, but its move to an entirely online conference meant I was able to attend a few talks at least. I have to say I don t like virtual conferences as much as the real thing; it s not as easy to have the casual chats at them, and it s also harder to carve out the exclusive time when you re at home. That said I spoke at NIDevConf this year, which was also fully virtual. It s not a Free Software focussed conference, but there s a lot of crossover in terms of technologies and I spoke on my experiences with Go, some of which are influenced by my packaging experiences within Debian.

Debian Most of my contributions to Free software happen within Debian. As part of the Data Protection Team I responded to various inbound queries to that team. Some of this involved chasing up other project teams who had been slow to respond - folks, if you re running a service that stores personal data about people then you need to be responsive to requests about it. The Debian Keyring was possibly my largest single point of contribution. We re in a roughly 3 month rotation of who handles the keyring updates, and I handled 2020.02.02, 2020.03.24, 2020.06.24, 2020.09.24 + 2020.12.24 For Debian New Members I m mostly inactive as an application manager - we generally seem to have enough available recently. If that changes I ll look at stepping in to help, but I don t see that happening. I continue to be involved in Front Desk, having various conversations throughout the year with the rest of the team, but there s no doubt Mattia and Pierre-Elliott are the real doers at present. In terms of package uploads I continued to work on gcc-xtensa-lx106, largely doing uploads to deal with updates to the GCC version or packaging (5, 6 + 7). sigrok had a few minor updates, libsigkrok 0.5.2-2, libsigrokdecode 0.5.3-2 as well as a new upstream release of Pulseview 0.4.2-1 and a fix to cope with change to QT 0.4.2-2. Due to the sigrok-firmware requirement on sdcc I also continued to help out there, updating to 4.0.0+dfsg-1 and doing some fixups in 4.0.0+dfsg-2. Despite still not writing an VHDL these days I continue to try and make sure ghdl is ok, because I found it a useful tool in the past. In 2020 that meant a new upstream release, 0.37+dfsg-1 along with a couple of more minor updates (0.37+dfsg-2 + 0.37+dfsg-3. libcli had a new upstream release, 1.10.4-1, and I did a long overdue update to sendip to the latest upstream release, 2.6-1 having been poked about an outstanding bug by the Reproducible Builds folk. OpenOCD is coming up to 4 years since its last stable release, but I did a snapshot upload to Debian experimental (0.10.0+g20200530-1) and a subsequent one to unstable (0.10.0+g20200819-1). There are also moves to produce a 0.11.0 release and I uploaded 0.11.0~rc1-1 as a result. libjaylink got a bump as a result (0.2.0-1) after some discussion with upstream.

OpenOCD On the subject of OpenOCD I ve tried to be a bit more involved upstream. I m not familiar enough with the intricacies of JTAG/SWD/the various architectures supported to contribute to the core, but I pushed the config for my HIE JTAG adapter upstream and try and review patches that don t require in depth hardware knowledge.

Linux I ve been contributing to the Linux kernel for a number of years now, mostly just minor bits here and there for issues I hit. This year I spent a lot of time getting support for the MikoTik RB3011 router upstreamed. That included the basic DTS addition, fixing up QCA8K to support SGMII CPU connections, adding proper 802.1q VLAN support to QCA8K and cleaning up an existing QCOM ADM driver that s required for the NAND. There were a number of associated bugfixes/minor changes found along the way too. It can be a little frustrating at times going round the review loop with submitting things upstream, but I do find it quite satisfying when it all comes together and I have no interest in weird vendor trees that just bitrot over time.

Software in the Public Interest I haven t sat on the board of SPI since 2015 but I was still acting as the primary maintainer of the membership website (with Martin Michlmayr as the other active contributor) and hosting it on my own machine. I managed to finally extricate myself from this role in August. I remain a contributing member.

Personal projects 2020 finally saw another release (0.6.0, followed swiftly by 0.6.1 to allow the upload of 0.6.1-1 to Debian) of onak. This release finally adds various improvements to deal with the hostility shown to the OpenPGP keyserver network in recent years, including full signature verification as an option. I fixed an oversight in my Digoo/1-wire temperature decoder and a bug that turned up on ARM but not MIPS in my mqtt-arp code. I should probably package it for Debian (even if I don t upload it), as I m running it on my RB3011 now.

13 November 2020

Martin Michlmayr: beancount2ledger 1.3 released

I released version 1.3 of beancount2ledger, the beancount to ledger converter that was moved from bean-report ledger into a standalone tool. You can get beancount2ledger from GitHub or via pip install. Here are the changes in 1.3:

3 November 2020

Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.5 released

I released version 2.5 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter. Here are the changes in 2.5: Thanks to input from Remco R nders, Yuri Khan, and Thierry. Thanks to Stefano Zacchiroli and Kirill Goncharov for testing my changes. You can get ledger2beancount from GitHub

27 July 2020

Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.4 released

I released version 2.4 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter. There are two notable changes in this release:
  1. I fixed two regressions introduced in the last release. Sorry about the breakage!
  2. I improved support for hledger. I believe all syntax differences in hledger are supported now.
Here are the changes in 2.4: Thanks to Kirill Goncharov for pointing out one regressions, to Taylor R Campbell for for a patch, to Stefano Zacchiroli for some input, and finally to Simon Michael for input on hledger! You can get ledger2beancount from GitHub

24 July 2020

Martin Michlmayr: beancount2ledger 1.1 released

Martin Blais recently announced that he'd like to re-organize the beancount code and split out some functionality into separate projects, including the beancount to ledger/hledger conversion code previously provided by bean-report. I agreed to take on the maintenance of this code and I've now released beancount2ledger, a beancount to ledger/hledger converter. You can install beancount2ledger with pip:
pip3 install beancount2ledger
Please report issues to the GitHub tracker. There are a number of outstanding issues I'll fix soon, but please report any other issues you encounter. Note that I'm not very familiar with hledger. I intend to sync up with hledger author Simon Michael soon, but please file an issue if you notice any problems with the hledger conversion. Version 1.1 contains a number of fixes compared to the latest code in bean-report: 1.1 (2020-07-24) 1.0 (2020-07-22)

26 June 2020

Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.3 released

I released version 2.3 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter. There are three notable changes with this release:
  1. Performance has significantly improved. One large, real-world test case has gone from around 160 seconds to 33 seconds. A smaller test case has gone from 11 seconds to ~3.5 seconds.
  2. The documentation is available online now (via Read the Docs).
  3. The repository has moved to the beancount GitHub organization.
Here are the changes in 2.3: Thanks to Colin Dean for some feedback. Thanks to Stefano Zacchiroli for prompting me into investigating performance issues (and thanks to the developers of the Devel::NYTProf profiler). You can get ledger2beancount from GitHub

30 May 2020

Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.2 released

I released version 2.2 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter. Here are the changes in 2.2: You can get ledger2beancount from GitHub. Thanks to GitHub user MarinBernard for reporting a bug with virtual postings!

6 April 2020

Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.1 released

I released version 2.1 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter. Here are the changes in 2.1: You can get ledger2beancount from GitHub. Thanks to Thierry (thdox) for reporting a bug and for fixing some typos in the documentation. Thanks to Stefano Zacchiroli for some good feedback.

21 June 2017

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: week 112 in Stretch cycle

Here's what happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday June 11 and Saturday June 17 2017: Upcoming events Upstream patches and bugs filed Reviews of unreproducible packages 1 package review has been added, 19 have been updated and 2 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues. Weekly QA work During our reproducibility testing, FTBFS bugs have been detected and reported by: diffoscope development tests.reproducible-builds.org As you might have noticed, Debian stretch was released last week. Since then, Mattia and Holger renamed our testing suite to stretch and added a buster suite so that we keep our historic results for stretch visible and can continue our development work as usual. In this sense, happy hacking on buster; may it become the best Debian release ever and hopefully the first reproducible one! Axel Beckert is currently in the process of setting up eight LeMaker HiKey960 boards. These boards were sponsored by Hewlett Packard Enterprise and will be hosted by the SOSETH students association at ETH Zurich. Thanks to everyone involved here and also thanks to Martin Michlmayr and Steve Geary who initiated getting these boards to us. Misc. This week's edition was written by Chris Lamb, Holger Levsen & reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible Builds folks on IRC & the mailing lists.

26 January 2017

Martin Michlmayr: Debian on Jetson TX1

Debian is now working on the NVIDIA Jetson TX1 developer kit, a development board based on the Tegra X1 chip (Tegra 210), a 64-bit ARM chip. We have a pre-built u-boot image in Debian as well as kernel and installer support. There are some minor kernel glitches but NVIDIA is very active upstream and I hope they'll get resolved soon. The Jetson TX1 developer kit makes a pretty good 64-bit ARM development platform. The board is supported in mainline u-boot and the mainline kernel and NVIDIA are pretty responsive to bug reports. Unfortunately, a proprietary blob is required for USB (and Ethernet is connected via USB). If you're interested in a good 64-bit ARM development platform, give Debian on the Jetson TX1 development kit a try.

28 July 2016

Gunnar Wolf: Subtitling DebConf talks Come and join!

As I have said here a couple of times already, I am teaching a diploma course on embedded Linux at UNAM, and one of the modules I'm teaching (with Sandino Araico) is the boot process. We focus on ARM for obvious reasons, and while I have done my reading on the topic, I am very far from considering myself an expert. So, after attending Martin Michlmayr's Debian on ARM devices talk, I decided to do its subtitles as part of my teaching job. This talk gives a great panorama on what actually has to happen in order to get an ARM machine to boot, and how support for new ARM devices comes around to Linux in general and to Debian in particular Perfect for our topic! But my students are not always very fluent in English, so giving a hand is always most welcome. In case any of you dear readers didn't know, we have a DebConf subtitling team. Yes, our work takes much longer to reach the public, and we have no hopes whatsoever in getting it completed, but every person lending a hand and subtitling a talk that they thought was interesting helps a lot to improve our talks' usability. Even if you don't have enough time to do the whole talk (we are talking about some 6hr per 45 minute session), adding a bit of work is very very very welcome. So... Enjoy And thanks in advance for your work!

25 July 2016

Martin Michlmayr: Debian on Jetson TK1

Debian on Jetson TK1 I became interested in running Debian on NVIDIA's Tegra platform recently. NVIDIA is doing a great job getting support for Tegra upstream (u-boot, kernel, X.org and other projects). As part of ensuring good Debian support for Tegra, I wanted to install Debian on a Jetson TK1, a development board from NVIDIA based on the Tegra K1 chip (Tegra 124), a 32-bit ARM chip. Ian Campbell enabled u-boot and Linux kernel support and added support in the installer for this device about a year ago. I updated some kernel options since there has been a lot of progress upstream in the meantime, performed a lot of tests and documented the installation process on the Debian wiki. Wookey made substantial improvements to the wiki as well. If you're interested in a good 32-bit ARM development platform, give Debian on the Jetson TK1 a try. There's also a 64-bit board. More on that later...

22 July 2016

Martin Michlmayr: Debian on Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS

The majority of NAS devices supported in Debian are based on Marvell's Kirkwood platform. This platform is quite dated now and can only run Debian's armel port. Debian now supports the Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS devices. They are based on Marvell's Armada 370, a platform which can run Debian's armhf port. Unfortunately, even the Armada 370 is a bit dated now, so I would not recommend these devices for new purchases. If you have one already, however, you now have the option to run native Debian. There are some features I like about the Seagate NAS devices: If you have a Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS, you can follow the instructions on the Debian wiki. If Seagate releases more NAS devices on Marvell's Armada platform, I intend to add Debian support.

2 May 2016

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible builds: week 53 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between April 24th and 30th 2016. Media coverage Reproducible builds were mentioned explicitly in two talks at the Mini-DebConf in Vienna: Aspiration together with the OTF CommunityLab released their report about the Reproducible Builds summit in December 2015 in Athens. Toolchain fixes Now that the GCC development window has been opened again, the SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH patch by Dhole and Matthias Klose to address the issue timestamps_from_cpp_macros (__DATE__ / __TIME__) has been applied upstream and will be released with GCC 7. Following that Matthias Klose also has uploaded gcc-5/5.3.1-17 and gcc-6/6.1.1-1 to unstable with a backport of that SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH patch. Emmanuel Bourg uploaded maven/3.3.9-4, which uses SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH for the maven.build.timestamp. (SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH specification) Other upstream changes Alexis Bienven e submitted a patch to Sphinx which extends SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH support for copyright years in generated documentation. Packages fixed The following 12 packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: hhvm jcsp libfann libflexdock-java libjcommon-java libswingx1-java mobile-atlas-creator not-yet-commons-ssl plexus-utils squareness svnclientadapter The following packages have became reproducible after being fixed: Some uploads have fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Patches submitted that have not made their way to the archive yet: Package reviews 95 reviews have been added, 15 have been updated and 129 have been removed in this week. 22 FTBFS bugs have been reported by Chris Lamb and Martin Michlmayr. diffoscope development strip-nondeterminism development tests.reproducible-builds.org Misc. Amongst the 29 interns who will work on Debian through GSoC and Outreachy there are four who will be contributing to Reproducible Builds for Debian and Free Software. We are very glad to welcome ceridwen, Satyam Zode, Scarlett Clark and Valerie Young and look forward to working together with them the coming months (and maybe beyond)! This week's edition was written by Reiner Herrmann and Holger Levsen and reviewed by a bunch of Reproducible builds folks on IRC.

10 March 2016

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 45 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the reproducible builds effort between February 28th and March 5th:

Toolchain fixes
  • Antonio Terceiro uploaded gem2deb/0.27 that forces generated gemspecs to use the date from debian/changelog.
  • Antonio Terceiro uploaded gem2deb/0.28 that forces generated gemspecs to have their contains file lists sorted.
  • Robert Luberda uploaded ispell/3.4.00-5 which make builds of hashes reproducible.
  • C dric Boutillier uploaded ruby-ronn/0.7.3-4 which will make the output locale agnostic. Original patch by Chris Lamb.
  • Markus Koschany uploaded spring/101.0+dfsg-1. Fixed by Alexandre Detiste.
Ximin Luo resubmitted the patch adding the --clamp-mtime option to Tar on Savannah's bug tracker. Lunar rebased our experimental dpkg on top of the current master branch. Changes in the test infrastructure are required before uploading a new version to our experimental repository. Reiner Herrmann rebased our custom texlive-bin against the latest uploaded version.

Packages fixed The following 77 packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: asciidoctor, atig, fuel-astute, jekyll, libphone-ui-shr, linkchecker, maven-plugin-testing, node-iscroll, origami-pdf, plexus-digest, pry, python-avro, python-odf, rails, ruby-actionpack-xml-parser, ruby-active-model-serializers, ruby-activerecord-session-store, ruby-api-pagination, ruby-babosa, ruby-carrierwave, ruby-classifier-reborn, ruby-compass, ruby-concurrent, ruby-configurate, ruby-crack, ruby-css-parser, ruby-cucumber-rails, ruby-delorean, ruby-encryptor, ruby-fakeweb, ruby-flexmock, ruby-fog-vsphere, ruby-gemojione, ruby-git, ruby-grack, ruby-htmlentities, ruby-jekyll-feed, ruby-json-schema, ruby-listen, ruby-markerb, ruby-mathml, ruby-mini-magick, ruby-net-telnet, ruby-omniauth-azure-oauth2, ruby-omniauth-saml, ruby-org, ruby-origin, ruby-prawn, ruby-pygments.rb, ruby-raemon, ruby-rails-deprecated-sanitizer, ruby-raindrops, ruby-rbpdf, ruby-rbvmomi, ruby-recaptcha, ruby-ref, ruby-responders, ruby-rjb, ruby-rspec-rails, ruby-rspec, ruby-rufus-scheduler, ruby-sass-rails, ruby-sass, ruby-sentry-raven, ruby-sequel-pg, ruby-sequel, ruby-settingslogic, ruby-shoulda-matchers, ruby-slack-notifier, ruby-symboltable, ruby-timers, ruby-zip, ticgit, tmuxinator, vagrant, wagon, yard. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet:
  • #816209 on elog by Reiner Herrmann: use printf instead of echo which is shell-independent.
  • #816214 on python-pip by Reiner Herrmann: removes timestamp from generated Python scripts.
  • #816230 on rows by Reiner Herrmann: tell grep to always treat the input as text.
  • #816232 on eficas by Reiner Herrmann: use printf instead of echo which is shell-independent.
Florent Daigniere and bancfc reported that linux-grsec was currently built with GRKERNSEC_RANDSTRUCT which will prevent reproducible builds with the current packaging.

tests.reproducible-builds.org pbuilder has been updated to the last version to be able to support Build-Depends-Arch and Build-Conflicts-Arch. (Mattia Rizzolo, h01ger) New package sets have been added for Subgraph OS, which is based on Debian Stretch: packages and build dependencies. (h01ger) Two new armhf build nodes have been added (thanks Vagrant Cascadian) and integrated in our Jenkins setup with 8 new armhf builder jobs. (h01ger)

strip-nondeterminism development strip-nondeterminism version 0.016-1 was released on Sunday 28th. It will now normalize the POT-Creation-Date field in GNU Gettext .mo files. (Reiner Herrmann) Several improvements to the packages metadata have also been made. (h01ger, Ben Finney)

Package reviews 185 reviews have been removed, 91 added and 33 updated in the previous week. New issue: fileorder_in_gemspec_files_list. 43 FTBFS bugs were reported by Chris Lamb, Martin Michlmayr, and gregor herrmann.

Misc. After merging the patch from Dhiru Kholia adding support for SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH in rpm, Florian Festi opened a discussion on the rpm-ecosystem mailing list about reproducible builds. On March 4th, Lunar gave an overview of the general reproducible builds effort at the Internet Freedom Festival in Valencia.

24 January 2016

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 39 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the reproducible builds effort between January 17th and January 23rd:

Toolchain fixes James McCoy uploaded subversion/1.9.3-2 which removes -Wdate-time from CPPFLAGS passed to swig enabling several packages to build again. The switch made in binutils/2.25-6 to use deterministic archives by default had the unfortunate effect of breaking a seldom used feature of make. Manoj Srivastava asked on debian-devel the best way to communicate the changes to Debian users. Lunar quickly came up with a patch that displays a warning when Make encounters deterministic archives. Manoj made it available in make/4.1-2 together with a NEWS file advertising the change. Following Guillem Jover's comment on the latest patch to make mtimes of packaged files deterministic, Daniel Kahn Gillmor updated and extended the patch adding the --clamp-mtime option to GNU Tar. Mattia Rizzolo updated texlive-bin in the reproducible experimental repository.

Packages fixed The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet:

reproducible.debian.net Transition from reproducible.debian.net to the more general tests.reproducible-builds.org has started. More visual changes are coming. (h01ger) A plan on how to run tests for F-Droid has been worked out. (hc, mvdan, h01ger) A first step has been made by adding a Jenkins job to setup an F-Droid build environment. (h01ger)

diffoscope development diffoscope 46 has been released on January 19th, followed-up by version 47 made available on January 23rd. Try it online at try.diffoscope.org! The biggest visible change is the improvement to ELF file handling. Comparisons are now done section by section, using the most appropriate tool and options to get meaningful results, thanks to Dhole's work and Mike Hommey's suggestions. Also suggested by Mike, symbols for IP-relative ops are now filtered out to remove clutter. Understanding differences in ELF files belonging to Debian packages should also be much easier as diffoscope will now try to extract debug information from the matching dbgsym package. This means objdump disassembler should output line numbers for packages built with recent debhelper as long as the associated debug package is in the same directory. As diff tends to consume huge amount of memory on large inputs, diffoscope has a limit in place to prevent crashes. diffoscope used to display a difference every time the limit was hit. Because this was confusing in case there were actually no differences, a hash is now internally computed to only report a difference when one exists. Files in archives and other container members are now compared in the original order. This should not matter in most case but overall give more predictable results. Debian .buildinfo files are now supported. Amongst other minor fixes and improvements, diffoscope will now properly compare symlinks in directories. Thanks Tuomas Tynkkynen for reporting the problem.

Package reviews 70 reviews have been removed, 125 added and 33 updated in the previous week, gcc-5 amongst others. 25 FTBFS issues have been filled by Chris Lamb, Daniel Stender, Martin Michlmayr.

Misc. The 16th FOSDEM will happen in Brussels, Belgium on January 30-31st. Several talks will be about reproducible builds: h01ger about the general ecosystem, Fabian Keil about the security oriented ElectroBSD, Baptiste Daroussin about FreeBSD packages, Ludovic Court s about Guix.

Martin Michlmayr: QNAP TS-x09 installer available again

Debian 8.3 came out today. As part of this update, Debian installer images for QNAP TS-109, TS-209 and TS-409 are available again. These devices are pretty old but there are still some users. We dropped installer support several years ago because the installer ramdisk was too large to fit in flash. Since then, users had to install Debian 6.0 (squeeze) and upgrade from there. When squeeze was removed from the Debian mirrors recently, I received mail from a number of users. I investigated a bit and found out that we can bring back the installer thanks to XZ compression and some other changes. The installer is available for jessie and stretch.

Next.