Search Results: "Lucas Kanashiro"

16 May 2020

Lucas Kanashiro: Quarantine times

After quite some time without publishing anything here, I decided to share the latest events. It is a hard time for most of us but with all this time at home, one can also do great things. I would like to start with the wonderful idea the Debian Brasil community had! Why not create an online Debian related conference to keep people s minds busy and also share knowledge? After brainstorming, we came up with our online conference called #FiqueEmCasaUseDebian (in English it would be #StayHomeUseDebian). It started on May 3rd and will last until May 30th (yes, one month)! Every weekday, we have one online talk at night and on every Saturday, a Debian packaging workshop. The feedback so far has been awesome and the Brazilian Debian community is reaching out to more people than usual at our regular conferences (as you might have imagined, Brazil is huge and it is hard to bring people at the same place). At the end of the month, we will have the first MiniDebConf online and I hope it will be as successful as our experience here in Brazil. Another thing that deserves a highlight is the fact that I became an Ubuntu Core Developer this month; yay! After 9 months of working almost daily on the Ubuntu Server, I was able to get my upload rights to the Ubuntu archive. I was tired of asking for sponsorship, and probably my peers were tired of me too. I could spend more time here complaining about the Brazilian government but I think it isn t worth it. Let s try to do something useful instead!

17 November 2017

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, October 2017

A Debian LTS logoLike each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS. Individual reports In October, about 197 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available: Evolution of the situation The number of sponsored hours increased slightly to 183 hours per month. With the increasing number of security issues to deal with, and with the number of open issues not really going down, I decided to bump the funding target to what amounts to 1.5 full-time position. The security tracker currently lists 50 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file 36 (we re a bit behind in CVE triaging apparently). Thanks to our sponsors New sponsors are in bold.

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7 November 2017

Lucas Kanashiro: My Debian LTS work on October

In this post I describe the work that I ve done until the end of October in the context of the Debian LTS team. This month I was allocated 5h and spent just 2h of them because I have written my master s qualification text (I am almost on my deadline to finish it). During November I intend to finish these 3h pending, so I did not request more hours. I basically worked with CVE-2017-0903 which is an issue related to YAML deserialization of gem specifications that could allow one execute remote code. Two packages in wheezy could be affected by this security vulnerability, rubygems and ruby1.9.1. The issue affects just RubyGems source code, but before Ruby version 1.9.1 it was maintained in a separated package, after that it was incorporated by ruby interpreter source package. After carefully read the upstream blogpost and reviewed the commit that intruduced this vulnerability, I was able to figure out whether the mentioned packages were affected or not. The modification was not present in both of them, and after some tests I did confirm that those versions of rubygems were not affected. The two packages were marked as not affected by CVE-2017-0903 in wheezy. Well, this was the summary of my activities in the Debian LTS team in October. See you next month :)

20 October 2017

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, September 2017

A Debian LTS logoLike each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS. Individual reports In August, about 170 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available: Evolution of the situation The number of sponsored hours is the same as last month. But we have a new sponsor in the pipe. The security tracker currently lists 52 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file 49. The number of packages with open issues decreased slightly compared to last month but we re not yet back to the usual situation. Thanks to our sponsors New sponsors are in bold.

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17 September 2017

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2017

A Debian LTS logoLike each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS. Individual reports In August, about 189 work hours have been dispatched among 12 paid contributors. Their reports are available: Evolution of the situation The number of sponsored hours is the same as last month. The security tracker currently lists 59 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file 60. The number of packages with open issues decreased slightly compared to last month but we re not yet back to the usual situation. The number of CVE to fix per package tends to increase due to the increased usage of fuzzers. Thanks to our sponsors New sponsors are in bold.

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10 July 2016

Bits from Debian: New Debian Developers and Maintainers (May and June 2016)

The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months: The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months: Congratulations!

26 June 2016

Clint Adams: A local script for local people

This isn't actually answering the question, but it's close. It's also horrible, so whoever adopts Enrico's script should also completely rewrite this or burn it along with the stack of pizza boxes and the grand piano. Input:
#!/bin/zsh
set -e
PATHS=$(tempfile)
NEWKEYS=$(tempfile)
NEWKEYRING=$(tempfile)
FARTHEST_TEN=$(tempfile)
trap "rm -f $ PATHS  $ NEWKEYS  $ NEWKEYRING  $ FARTHEST_TEN " EXIT
keyring=$ 1:-ksp-dc16.gpg 
myfpr=$ 2:-2100A32C46F895AF3A08783AF6D3495BB0AE9A02 
#keyserver=$ 3:-http://pool.sks-keyservers.net:11371/ 
# this doesn't handle hokey fetch failures
#(for fpr in $(hkt list --keyring $ keyring  --output-format JSON   jq '.[].publickey.fpr')
#do
#  hokey fetch --keyserver "$ keyserver " --validation-method MatchPrimaryKeyFingerprint "$ (Q)fpr "
#done) >$ NEWKEYS 
#
#gpg2 --no-default-keyring --keyring $ NEWKEYRING  --import $ NEWKEYS 
cp "$ keyring " "$ NEWKEYRING "
gpg2 --no-default-keyring --keyring $ NEWKEYRING  --refresh
hkt findpaths --keyring $ NEWKEYRING  '' '' '' > $ PATHS 
id=$(awk -F, "/$ myfpr )\$/  sub(/\(/,BLANKY,\$1);print \$1; " $ PATHS )
grep -e ",\[$ id ," -e ",$ id \]" $ PATHS    sort -n   tail -n 10 > $ FARTHEST_TEN 
targetids=($ (f)"$ $((sed 's/^.*\[//;s/,.*$//;' $ FARTHEST_TEN ; sed 's/\])$//;s/.*,//;' $ FARTHEST_TEN )   sort -n -u   grep -v "^$ id $") " )
targetfprs=($(for i in $ targetids ; do awk -F, "/\($ i ,[^[]/  sub(/\)/,BLANKY,\$2); print \$2 " $ PATHS ; done))
gpg2 --no-default-keyring --keyring $ NEWKEYRING  --list-keys $ targetfprs 
Output:
pub   rsa4096/0x664F1238AA8F138A 2015-07-14 [SC]
      Key fingerprint = 3575 0B8F B6EF 95FF 16B8  EBC0 664F 1238 AA8F 138A
uid                   [ unknown] Daniel Lange <dl.ml1@usrlocal.de>
sub   rsa4096/0x03BEE1C11DB1954B 2015-07-14 [E]
pub   rsa4096/0xDF23DA3396978EB3 2014-09-05 [SC]
      Key fingerprint = BBBC 58B4 5994 CF9C CC56  BCDA DF23 DA33 9697 8EB3
uid                   [  undef ] Michael Meskes <michael@fam-meskes.de>
uid                   [  undef ] Michael Meskes <meskes@postgresql.org>
uid                   [  undef ] Michael Meskes <michael.meskes@credativ.com>
uid                   [  undef ] Michael Meskes <meskes@debian.org>
sub   rsa4096/0x85C3AFFECF0BF9B5 2014-09-05 [E]
sub   rsa4096/0x35D857C0BBCB3B25 2014-11-04 [S]
pub   rsa4096/0x1E953E27D4311E58 2009-07-12 [SC]
      Key fingerprint = C2FE 4BD2 71C1 39B8 6C53  3E46 1E95 3E27 D431 1E58
uid                   [  undef ] Chris Lamb <chris@chris-lamb.co.uk>
uid                   [  undef ] Chris Lamb <lamby@gnu.org>
uid                   [  undef ] Chris Lamb <lamby@debian.org>
sub   rsa4096/0x72B3DBA98575B3F2 2009-07-12 [E]
pub   rsa4096/0xDF6D76C44D696F6B 2014-08-15 [SC] [expires: 2017-06-03]
      Key fingerprint = 1A6F 3E63 9A44 67E8 C347  6525 DF6D 76C4 4D69 6F6B
uid                   [ unknown] Sven Bartscher <sven.bartscher@weltraumschlangen.de>
uid                   [ unknown] Sven Bartscher <svenbartscher@yahoo.de>
uid                   [ unknown] Sven Bartscher <kritzefitz@debian.org>
sub   rsa4096/0x9E83B071ED764C3A 2014-08-15 [E]
sub   rsa4096/0xAEB25323217028C2 2016-06-14 [S]
pub   rsa4096/0x83E33BD7D4DD4CA1 2015-11-12 [SC] [expires: 2017-11-11]
      Key fingerprint = 0B5A 33B8 A26D 6010 9C50  9C6C 83E3 3BD7 D4DD 4CA1
uid                   [ unknown] Jerome Charaoui <jerome@riseup.net>
sub   rsa4096/0x6614611FBD6366E7 2015-11-12 [E]
sub   rsa4096/0xDB17405204ECB364 2015-11-12 [A] [expires: 2017-11-11]
pub   rsa4096/0xF823A2729883C97C 2014-08-26 [SC]
      Key fingerprint = 8ED6 C3F8 BAC9 DB7F C130  A870 F823 A272 9883 C97C
uid                   [ unknown] Lucas Kanashiro <kanashiro@debian.org>
uid                   [ unknown] Lucas Kanashiro <kanashiro.duarte@gmail.com>
sub   rsa4096/0xEE6E5D1A9C2F5EA6 2014-08-26 [E]
pub   rsa4096/0x2EC0FFB3B7301B1F 2014-08-29 [SC] [expires: 2017-04-06]
      Key fingerprint = 76A2 8E42 C981 1D91 E88F  BA5E 2EC0 FFB3 B730 1B1F
uid                   [ unknown] Niko Tyni <ntyni@debian.org>
uid                   [ unknown] Niko Tyni <ntyni@cc.helsinki.fi>
uid                   [ unknown] Niko Tyni <ntyni@iki.fi>
sub   rsa4096/0x129086C411868FD0 2014-08-29 [E] [expires: 2017-04-06]
pub   rsa4096/0xAA761F51CC10C92A 2016-06-20 [SC] [expires: 2018-06-20]
      Key fingerprint = C9DE 2EA8 93EE 4C86 BE73  973A AA76 1F51 CC10 C92A
uid                   [ unknown] Roger Shimizu <rogershimizu@gmail.com>
sub   rsa4096/0x2C2EE1D5DBE7B292 2016-06-20 [E] [expires: 2018-06-20]
sub   rsa4096/0x05C7FD79DD03C4BB 2016-06-20 [S] [expires: 2016-09-18]
Note that this completely neglects potential victims who are unconnected within the KSP set.

21 August 2015

Simon Kainz: DUCK challenge: Final week

Well, here are the stats for the final week of the DUCK challenge as well as DebConf15: So we had 21 packages fixed and uploaded by 14 different uploaders. People were really working hard on this during DebConf. A big "Thank You" to you!! Since the start of this challenge, a total of 89 packages, were fixed. Here is a quick overview:
Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7
# Packages 10 15 10 14 10 9 21
Total 10 25 35 49 59 68 89
Thank you all for participating - either on purpose or "accidentially": Some people were really surprised as i sneaked up on them at DebConf15, confronting them with a green lighter! I just tried to put even more fun into Debian, i hope this worked out Pevious articles are here: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Week 4, Week 5,Week 6.

5 August 2015

Antonio Terceiro: Elixir in Debian, MiniDebconf at FISL, and Debian CI updates

In June I started keeping track of my Debian activities, and this is my July update. Elixir in Debian Elixir is a functional language built on top of the Erlang virtual machine. If features imutable data structures, interesting concurrency primitives, and everything else that Erlang does, but with a syntax inspired by Ruby what makes it much more aproachable in my opinion. Those interested in Elixir for Debian are encouraged to hang around in #debian-elixir on the OFTC IRC servers. There are still a lot of things to figure out, for example how packaging Elixir libraries and applications is going to work. MiniDebconf at FISL, and beyond I helped organize a MiniDebconf at this year s FISL, in Porto Alegre on the 10th of July. The whole program was targetted at getting more people to participate in Debian, so there were talks about translation, packaging, and a few other more specific topics. I myself gave two talks: one about Debian basics, What is Debian, and how it works , and second one on packaging the free software web , which I will also give at Debconf15 later this month. The recordings are available (all talks in Portuguese) at the Debian video archive thanks to Holger Levsen. We are also organizing a new MiniDebconf in October as part of the Latinoware schedule. Ruby We are in the middle of a transition to switch to Ruby 2.2 as default in Debian unstable, and we are almost there. The Ruby transition is now on hold while GCC 5 one is going on, but will be picked up as soon as were are done with GCC 5. ruby-defaults has been uploaded to experimental for those that want to try having Ruby 2.2 as default before that change hits unstable. I myself have been using Ruby 2.2 as default for several weeks without any problem so far, including using vagrant on a daily basis and doing all my development on sid with it. I started taking notes about Ruby interpreter transitions work to make sure that knowledge is registered. I have uploaded minor security updates of both ruby2.1 and ruby2.2 to unstable. They both reached testing earlier today. I have also fixed another bug in redmine, which I hope to get into stable as well as soon as possible. gem2deb has seen several improvements through versions 0.19, 0.20, 0.20.1 and 0.20.2. I have updated a few packages: Two NEW packages, ruby-rack-contrib and ruby-grape-logging ,were ACCEPTED into the Debian archive. Kudos to the ftp-master team who are doing an awesome job reviewing new packages really fast. Debian Continuous Integration This month I have made good progress with the changes needed to make debci work as a distributed system with one master/scheduler node and as many worker nodes (running tests) as possible. While doing my tests, I have submitted a patch to lxc and updated autodep8 in unstable. At some point I plan to upload both autodep8 and autopkgtest to jessie-backports. Sponsoring I have sponsored a few packages:

31 July 2015

Simon Kainz: DUCK challenge: week 4

The DUCK challenge is making a quite stable progress: in the last 4 weeks there were approximately 12.25 packages fixed and uploaded per week. In the current week the following packages were fixed and uploaded into unstable: So we had 14 packages fixed and uploaded by 10 different uploaders. A big "Thank You" to you!! Since the start of this challenge, a total of 49 packages, uploaded by 31 different persons were fixed. Here is a quick overview:
Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7
# Packages 10 15 10 14 - - -
Total 10 25 35 49 - - -
The list of the fixed and updated packages is availabe here. I will try to update this ~daily. If I missed one of your uploads, please drop me a line. DebConf15 is approaching quite fast, so please get involved: The DUCK Challenge is running until end of DebConf15! Pevious articles are here: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3.

2 July 2015

Antonio Terceiro: Upgrades to Jessie, Ruby 2.2 transition, and chef update

Last month I started to track all the small Debian-related things that I do. My initial motivation was to be concious about how often I spend short periods of time working on Debian. Sometimes it s during lunch breaks, weekends, first thing in the morning before regular work, after I am done for the day with regular work, or even during regular work, since I do have the chance of doing Debian work as part of my regular work occasionally. Now that I have this information, I need to do something with it. So this is probably the first of monthly updates I will post about my Debian work. Hopefully it won t be the last. Upgrades to Jessie I (finally) upgraded my two servers to Jessie. The first one, my home server, is a Utilite which is a quite nice ARM box. It is silent and consumes very little power. The only problem I had with it is that the vendor-provided kernel is too old, so I couldn t upgrade udev, and therefore couldn t switch to systemd. I had to force systemv for now, until I can manage to upgrade the kernel and configure uboot to properly boot the official Debian kernel. On my VPS things are way better. I was able to upgrade nicely, and it is now running a stock Jessie system. fixed https on ci.debian.net pabs had let me know on IRC of an issue with the TLS certificate for ci.debian.net, which took me a few iterations to get right. It was missing the intermediate certificates, and is now fixed. You can now enjoy Debian CI under https . Ruby 2.2 transition I was able to start the Ruby 2.2 transition, which has the goal of switch to Ruby 2.2 on unstable. The first step was updating ruby-defaults adding support to build Ruby packgaes for both Ruby 2.1 and Ruby 2.2. This was followed by updates to gem2deb (0.18, 0.18.1, 0.18.2, and 0.18.3) and rubygems-integration . At this point, after a few rebuild requests only 50 out of 137 packages need to be looked at; some of them just use the default Ruby, so a rebuild once we switch the default will be enough to make it use Ruby 2.2, while others, specially Ruby libraries, will still need porting work or other fixes. Updated the Chef stack Bringing chef to the very latest upstream release into unstable was quite some work. I had to update: In the middle I also had to package a new dependency, ruby-ffi-yajl, which was very quickly ACCEPTED thanks to the awesome work of the ftp-master team. Random bits

2 September 2014

Antonio Terceiro: DebConf 14: Community, Debian CI, Ruby, Redmine, and Noosfero

This time, for personal reasons I wasn t able to attend the full DebConf, which started on the Saturday August 22nd. I arrived at Portland on the Tuesday the 26th by noon, at the 4th of the conference. Even though I would like to arrive earlier, the loss was alleviated by the work of the amazing DebConf video team. I was able to follow remotely most of the sessions I would like to attend if I were there already. As I will say to everyone, DebConf is for sure the best conference I have ever attended. The technical and philosophical discussions that take place in talks, BoF sessions or even unplanned ad-hoc gathering are deep. The hacking moments where you have a chance to pair with fellow developers, with whom you usually only have contact remotely via IRC or email, are precious. That is all great. But definitively, catching up with old friends, and making new ones, is what makes DebConf so special. Your old friends are your old friends, and meeting them again after so much time is always a pleasure. New friendships will already start with a powerful bond, which is being part of the Debian community. Being only 4 hours behind my home time zone, jetlag wasn t a big problem during the day. However, I was waking up too early in the morning and consequently getting tired very early at night, so I mostly didn t go out after hacklabs were closed at 10PM. Despite all of the discussion, being in the audience for several talks, other social interactions and whatnot, during this DebConf I have managed to do quite some useful work. debci and the Debian Continuous Integration project I gave a talk where I discussed past, present, and future of debci and the Debian Continuous Integration project. The slides are available, as well as the video recording. One thing I want you to take away is that there is a difference between debci and the Debian Continuous Integration project: A few days before DebConf, C dric Boutillier managed to extract gem2deb-test-runner from gem2deb, so that autopkgtest tests can be run against any Ruby package that has tests by running gem2deb-test-runner --autopkgtest. gem2deb-test-runner will do the right thing, make sure that the tests don t use code from the source package, but instead run them against the installed package. Then, right after my talk I was glad to discover that the Perl team is also working on a similar tool that will automate running tests for their packages against the installed package. We agreed that they will send me a whitelist of packages in which we could just call that tool and have it do The Right Thing. We might be talking here about getting autopkgtest support (and consequentially continuous integration) for free for almost 2000 4000 packages. The missing bits for this to happen are: During a few days I have mentored Lucas Kanashiro, who also attended DebConf, on writing a patch to add support for email notifications in debci so maintainers can be pro-actively notified of status changes (pass/fail, fail/pass) in their packages. I have also started hacking on the support for distributed workers, based on the initial work by Martin Pitt: Ruby I had some discusion with Christian about making Rubygems install to $HOME by default when the user is not root. We discussed a few implementation options, and while I don t have a solution yet, we have a better understanding of the potential pitfalls. The Ruby BoF session on Friday produced a few interesting discussions. Some take away point include, but are not limited to: Redmine I was able to make Redmine work with the Rails 4 stack we currently have in unstable/testing. This required using a snapshot of the still unreleased version 3.0 based on the rails-4.1 branch in the upstream Subversion repository as source. I am a little nervous about using a upstream snapshot, though. According to the "roadmap of the project ":http://www.redmine.org/projects/redmine/roadmap the only purpose of the 3.0 release will be to upgrade to Rails 4, but before that happens there should be a 2.6.0 release that is also not released yet. 3.0 should be equivalent to that 2.6.0 version both feature-wise and, specially, bug-wise. The only problem is that we don t know what that 2.6.0 looks like yet. According to the roadmap it seems there is not much left in term of features for 2.6.0, though. The updated package is not in unstable yet, but will be soon. It needs more testing, and a good update to the documentation. Those interested in helping to test Redmine on jessie before the freeze please get in touch with me. Noosfero I gave a lighting talk on Noosfero, a platform for social networking websites I am upstream for. It is a Rails appplication licensed under the AGPLv3, and there are packages for wheezy. You can checkout the slides I used. Video recording is not available yet, but should be soon. That s it. I am looking forward to DebConf 15 at Heidelberg. :-)

1 June 2014

Antonio Terceiro: An introduction to the Debian Continuous Integration project

Debian is a big system. At the time of writing, looking at my local package list caches tells me that the unstable suite contains 21306 source packages, and 42867 binary packages on amd64. Between these 42867 binary packages, there is an unthinkable number of inter-package dependencies. For example the dependency graph of the ruby packages contains other 20-something packages. A new version of any of these packages can potentially break some functionality in the ruby package. And that dependency graph is very small. Looking at the dependency graph for, say, the rails package will make your eyes bleed. I tried it here, and GraphViz needed a PNG image with 7653 10003 pixels to draw it. It ain t pretty. Installing rails on a clean Debian system will pull in another 109 packages as part of the dependency chain. Again, as new versions of those packages are uploaded the archive, there is a probability that a backwards-incompatible change, or even a bug fix which was being worked around, might make some funcionality in rails stop working. Even if that probability is low for each package in the dependency chain, with enough packages the probability of any of them causing problems for rails is quite high. And still the rails dependency chain is not that big. libreoffice will pull in another 264 packages. gnome will pull in 1311 dependencies, and kde-full 1320 (!). With a system this big, problems will arrive, and that s a fact of life. As developers, what we can do is try to spot these problems as early as possible, and fixing them in time to make a solid release with the high quality Debian is known for. While automated testing is not the proverbial Silver Bullet of Software Engineering, it is an effective way of finding regressions. Back in 2006, Ian Jackson started the development of autopkgtest as a tool to test Debian packages in their installed form (as opposed to testing packages using their source tree). In 2011, the autopkgtest test suite format was proposed as a standard for the Debian project, in what we now know as the DEP-8 specification. Since then, some maintainers such as myself started experimenting with DEP-8 tests in their packages. There was an expectation in the air that someday, someone would run those tests for the entire archive, and that would be a precious source of QA information. Durign the holiday break last year, I decided to give it a shot. I initially called the codebase dep8. Later I renamed it to debci, since it could potentially also run other other types of test suites in the future. Since early January, ci.debian.net run an instance of debci for the Debian Project. The Debian continuous Integration will trigger tests at most 4 times a day, 3 hours after each dinstall run. It will update a local APT cache and look for packages that declare a DEP-8 test suite. Each package with a test suite will then have its test suite executed if there was any change in its dependency chain since the last test run. Existing test results are published at ci.debian.net every hour, and at the end of each batch a global status is updated. Maintainers can subscribe to a per package Atom feed to keep up with their package test results. People interested in the overall status can subscribe to a global Atom feed of events. Since the introduction of Debian CI in mid-January 2014, we have seen an amazing increase in the number of packages with test suites. We had little less than 200 packages with test suites back then, against around 350 now (early June 2014). The ratio of packages passing passing their test suite has also improved a lot, going from less than 50% to more than 75%. There is documentation available, including a FAQ for package maintainers with further information about how the system works, how to declare test suites in their packages and how to reproduce test runs locally. Also available is development information about debci itself, to those inclined to help improve the system. This is just the beginning. debci is under a good rate of development, and you can expect to see a constant flux of improvements. In special, I would like to mention a few people who are giving amazing contributions to the project:

22 April 2014

Bits from Debian: Debian welcomes its 2014 GSoC students!

We're excited to announce that 19 students have been selected to work with Debian during the Google Summer of Code this year! Here is the list of accepted students and projects: As always, you will be able to follow their progress on the SoC coordination mailing-list Congratulations to all the students and let's make sure we all have an amazing summer!

Bits from Debian: Debian welcomes its 2014 GSoC students!

We're excited to announce that 19 students have been selected to work with Debian during the Google Summer of Code this year! Here is the list of accepted students and projects: As always, you will be able to follow their progress on the SoC coordination mailing-list Congratulations to all the students and let's make sure we all have an amazing summer!