Search Results: "Holger Levsen"

1 September 2021

Holger Levsen: 20210901-Debian-Reunion-Hamburg-2021

Debian Reunion Hamburg 2021 Moin! I'm glad to finally be able to send out this invitation for the "Debian Reunion Hamburg 2021" taking place at the venue of the 2018 & 2019 MiniDebConfs! The event will run from Monday, Sep 27 2021 until Friday Oct 1 2021, with Sunday, Sep 26 2021 as arrival day. IOW, Debian people meet again in Hamburg. The exact format is less defined and structured than previous years, probably we will just be hacking from Monday to Wednesday, have talks on Thursday and a nice day trip on Friday. Please read https://wiki.debian.org/DebianEvents/de/2021/DebianReunionHamburg if you intend to attend, especially Probably having some video coverage would be very nice to have, though due to this very late announcement I'm not sure we'll really have talks and the need for video. The event is in 3.5 weeks and will take place, either as a very small hack meeting, or somewhat bigger. We certainly want videoing if we have talks - and if you could help with this that would be very great! Last and definitly not least, financial sponsors for the event would be great. If you can support the "Debian Reunion Hamburg 2021", please contact me directly! Now, late, after weeks of wondering if and how to do this event, I'm finally and very much looking forward to it, to meet some Debian folks at least & for some shared Debian hacking. Definitly not the 2021 event I had in mind after the 2019 one, but something I feel I can responsibly do & enjoy. So, hoping to see some of you soon & most of you later! ;-) Sad but true, and at least something for some people. We should all do more local events. And more online events too, eg I think this is a great idea too: https://wiki.debian.org/DebianEvents/internet/2021/MiniDebConfOnlineBookworm See you!

25 August 2021

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, July 2021

A Debian LTS logo
Like each month, have a look at the work funded by Freexian s Debian LTS offering. Debian project funding In July, we put aside 2400 EUR to fund Debian projects. We haven t received proposals of projects to fund in the last months, so we have scheduled a discussion during Debconf to try to to figure out why that is and how we can fix that. Join us on August 26th at 16:00 UTC on this link. We are pleased to announce that Jeremiah Foster will help out to make this initiative a success : he can help Debian members to come up with solid proposals, he can look for people willing to do the work once the project has been formalized and approved, and he will make sure that the project implementation keeps on track when the actual work has begun. We re looking forward to receive more projects from various Debian teams! Learn more about the rationale behind this initiative in this article. Debian LTS contributors In July, 12 contributors have been paid to work on Debian LTS, their reports are available: Evolution of the situation In July we released 30 DLAs. Also we were glad to welcome Neil Williams and Lee Garrett who became active contributors. The security tracker currently lists 63 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 17 packages needing an update. We would like to thank Holger Levsen for the years of work where he managed/coordinated the paid LTS contributors. Jeremiah Foster will take over his duties. Thanks to our sponsors Sponsors that joined recently are in bold.

17 July 2021

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, June 2021

A Debian LTS logo
Like each month, have a look at the work funded by Freexian s Debian LTS offering. Debian project funding In June, we put aside 5775 EUR to fund Debian projects for which we re looking forward to receive more projects from various
Debian teams! Learn more about the rationale behind this initiative in this article. Debian LTS contributors In June, 12 contributors have been paid to work on Debian LTS, their reports are available: Evolution of the situation In June we released 30 DLAs. As already written last month we are looking for a Debian LTS project manager and team coordinator.
Finally, we would like to remark once again that we are constantly looking for new contributors. Please contact Holger if you are interested! The security tracker currently lists 41 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 23 packages needing an update. Thanks to our sponsors Sponsors that joined recently are in bold.

15 June 2021

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, May 2021

A Debian LTS logo
Like each month, have a look at the work funded by Freexian s Debian LTS offering. Debian project funding In May, we again put aside 2100 EUR to fund Debian projects. There was no proposals for new projects received, thus we re looking forward to receive more projects from various Debian teams! Please do not hesitate to submit a proposal, if there is a project that could benefit from the funding! We re looking forward to receive more projects from various Debian teams! Learn more about the rationale behind this initiative in this article. Debian LTS contributors In May, 12 contributors have been paid to work on Debian LTS, their reports are available: Evolution of the situation In May we released 33 DLAs and mostly skipped our public IRC meeting and the end of the month. In June we ll have another team meeting using video as lined out on our LTS meeting page.
Also, two months ago we announced that Holger would step back from his coordinator role and today we are announcing that he is back for the time being, until a new coordinator is found.
Finally, we would like to remark once again that we are constantly looking for new contributors. Please contact Holger if you are interested! The security tracker currently lists 41 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 21 packages needing an update. Thanks to our sponsors Sponsors that joined recently are in bold.

28 May 2021

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, April 2021

A Debian LTS logo
Like each month, have a look at the work funded by Freexian s Debian LTS offering. Debian project funding In April, we put aside 5775 EUR to fund Debian projects. There was no proposals for new projects received, thus we re looking forward to receive more projects from various Debian teams! Please do not hesitate to submit a proposal, if there is a project that could benefit from the funding! Debian LTS contributors In April, 11 contributors have been paid to work on Debian LTS, their reports are available: Evolution of the situation In April we released 33 DLAs and held a LTS team meeting using video conferencing. The security tracker currently lists 53 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 26 packages needing an update. We are please to welcome VyOS as a new gold sponsor! Thanks to our sponsors Sponsors that joined recently are in bold.

30 April 2021

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, March 2021

A Debian LTS logo
Like each month, have a look at the work funded by Freexian s Debian LTS offering. Debian project funding In March, we put aside 3225 EUR to fund Debian projects but sadly nobody picked up anything, so this one of the many reasons Raphael posted as series of blog posts titled Challenging times for Freexian , posted in 4 parts on the last two days of March and the first two of April. [Part one, two, three and four] So we re still looking forward to receive more projects from various Debian teams! Learn more about the rationale behind this initiative in this article! Debian LTS contributors In March, 11 contributors have been paid to work on Debian LTS, their reports are available: Evolution of the situation In March we released 28 DLAs and held our second LTS team meeting for 2021 on IRC, with the next public IRC meeting coming up at the end of May. At that meeting Holger announced that after 2.5 years he wanted to step back from his role helping Rapha l in coordinating/managing the LTS team. We would like to thank Holger for his continuous work on Debian LTS (which goes back to 2014) and are happy to report that we already found a successor which we will introduce in the upcoming April report from Freexian. Finally, we would like to remark once again that we are constantly looking for new contributors. For a last time, please contact Holger if you are interested! The security tracker currently lists 42 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 28 packages needing an update. We are also pleased to report that we got 4 new sponsors over the last 2 months : thanks to sipgate GmbH, OVH US LLC, Tilburg University and Observatoire des Sciences de l Univers de Grenoble ! Thanks to our sponsors Sponsors that joined recently are in bold.

22 March 2021

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, February 2020

A Debian LTS logo
Like each month, have a look at the work funded by Freexian s Debian LTS offering. Debian project funding In February, we put aside 5475 EUR to fund Debian projects. The first project from this initiative was finished and thus Carles Pina was able to issue the first invoice! We are looking forward to receive more projects from various Debian teams and contributors. Learn more about the rationale behind this initiative in this article. Debian LTS contributors In February, 12 contributors have been paid to work on Debian LTS, their reports are available: Evolution of the situation In February we released 28 DLAs (including one regression update) and we held an internal team meeting using video chat.
Finally, as every month we would like to remark once again that we are constantly looking for new contributors. Please contact Holger if you are interested! The security tracker currently lists 46 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 34 packages needing an update. Thanks to our sponsors Sponsors that joined recently are in bold.

21 February 2021

Louis-Philippe V ronneau: dput-ng or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Hooks

As my contributions to Debian continue to grow in number, I find myself uploading to the archive more and more often. Although I'm pretty happy with my current sbuild-based workflow, twice in the past few weeks I inadvertently made a binary upload instead of a source-only one.1 As it turns out, I am not the only DD who has had this problem before. As Nicolas Dandrimont kindly pointed to me, dput-ng supports pre and post upload hooks that can be used to lint your uploads. Even better, it also ships with a check-debs hook that lets you block binary uploads. Pretty neat, right? In a perfect world, enabling the hook would only be a matter of adding it in the hook list of /etc/dput.d/metas/debian.json and using the following defaults:
"check-debs":  
    "enforce": "source",
    "skip": false
 ,
Sadly, bug #983160 currently makes this whole setup more complex than it should be and forces me to use two different dput-ng profiles pointing to two different files in /etc/dput.d/metas: a default source-only one (ftp-master) and a binary upload one (ftp-master-binary). Otherwise, one could use a single profile that disallows binary uploads and when needed, override the hook using something like this:
$ dput --override "check-debs.enforce=debs" foo_1.0.0-1_amd64.changes
I did start debugging the --override issue in dput-ng, but I'm not sure I'll have time to submit a patch anytime soon. In the meantime, I'm happy to report I shouldn't be uploading the wrong .changes file by mistake again!

  1. Thanks to Holger Levsen and Adrian Bunk for catching those and notifying me.

15 February 2021

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, January 2020

A Debian LTS logo Like each month, have a look at the work funded by Freexian s Debian LTS offering. Debian project funding In January, we put aside 2175 EUR to fund Debian projects. As part of this Carles Pina i Estany started to work on better no-dsa support for the PTS which recently resulted in two merge requests which will hopefully be deployed soon. We re looking forward to receive more projects from various Debian teams! Learn more about the rationale behind this initiative in this article. Debian LTS contributors In January, 13 contributors have been paid to work on Debian LTS, their reports are available: Evolution of the situation In January we released 28 DLAs and held our first LTS team meeting for 2021 on IRC, with the next public IRC meeting coming up at the end of March. During that meeting Utkarsh shared that after he rolled out the python-certbot update (on December 8th 2020) the maintainer told him: I just checked with Let s Encrypt, and the stats show that you just saved 142,500 people from having their certificates start failing next month. I didn t know LTS was still that used!

Finally, we would like to welcome sipgate GmbH as a new silver sponsor. Also remember that we are constantly looking for new contributors. Please contact Holger if you are interested. The security tracker currently lists 43 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 23 packages needing an update. Thanks to our sponsors Sponsors that joined recently are in bold.

20 January 2021

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2020

A Debian LTS logo Like each month, have a look at the work funded by Freexian s Debian LTS offering. Debian project funding In December, we put aside 2100 EUR to fund Debian projects. The first project proposal (a tracker.debian.org improvement for the security team) was received and quickly approved by the paid contributors, then we opened a request for bids and the bid winner was announced today (it was easy, we had only one candidate). Hopefully this first project will be completed until our next report. We re looking forward to receive more projects from various Debian teams! Learn more about the rationale behind this initiative in this article. Debian LTS contributors In December, 12 contributors have been paid to work on Debian LTS, their reports are available: Evolution of the situation December was a quiet month as we didn t have a team meeting nor any other unusual activity and we released 43 DLAs. The security tracker currently lists 30 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 25 packages needing an update. This month we are pleased to welcome Deveryware as new sponsor! Thanks to our sponsors Sponsors that joined recently are in bold.

31 December 2020

Holger Levsen: 20201231-no-source-change-source-uploads

On doing 540 no-source-change source-only uploads in two weeks So I've been doing 540 no-source-change source-only uploads in the last two weeks and am planning to do 3000 more in January 2021. We'll see how that goes ;) Let me explain what I have been doing and why. So, starting with the Bullseye release cycle the Release Team changed policy: only packages which were build on buildds are allowed to migrate to testing. Which is pretty nice for reproducible builds as this also ensures that a .buildinfo file is available for anyone wanting to reproduce the binaries of that package. However, there are many binary (and source) packages in Debian which were uploaded before 2016 (which is when .buildinfo files were introduced) or were uploaded with binaries until that change in release policy July 2019. Then Ivo De Decker scheduled binNMUs for all the affected packages but due to the way binNMUs work, he couldn't do anything about arch:all packages as they currently cannot be rebuilt with binNMUs. Ivo and myself discussed what could be done about the remaining packages and (besides long complicated changes to Debian's workflows) the only thing deemed possible was doing many many source uploads with just a new changelog entry:
  * Non maintainer upload by the Reproducible Builds team.
  * No source change upload to rebuild on buildd with .buildinfo files.
These packages are all inherently buggy, because Debian policy mandates that packages should be reproducible and without .buildinfo files one cannot reproducibly rebuild packages. So instead of filing many many bugs we've decided to just fix these bugs by doing a no-source-change source uploads. One nice aspect of these uploads is that there's no follow-up work imposed on the maintainer: whether they keep that changelog entry or whether they discard it, it does not matter. So Ivo had developed an SQL query which showed 570 packages needing an update roughly two weeks ago, on December 18 and so I started slowly. This is the amount of NMUs I did in the last days:
for i in $(seq 18 30) ; do echo -n "Dec $i: " ; ls -lart1 done/*upload grep -c "Dec $i" ; done
Dec 18: 12
Dec 19: 0
Dec 20: 3
Dec 21: 13
Dec 22: 13
Dec 23: 16
Dec 24: 4
Dec 25: 28
Dec 26: 0
Dec 27: 38
Dec 28: 198
Dec 29: 206
Dec 30: 9
About ten packages had FTBFS bugs preventing an upload and seven packages were uploaded by the maintainer before me. I've seen two cases of sudden maintainer uploads after 8 and 10 years of no activity! So what did I do for each upload? Much to my surprise I didn't get much feedback, there were like 6 people on the #debian-reproducible channel cheering and one on #debian-qa, though that person is a Release Team member so that was kind of important cheering. And I've seen some maintainer uploads to packages which haven't seen uploads since some years. And really nice: no-one complained so far. I hope this will stay this way with the plan to do 3000 more uploads of this kind: Those 570 packages were only key packages but there are 3000 more source packages which have a binary in bullseye for which no .buildinfo file exists. So I plan to upload them all in January 2021 and you can help me doing so, by uploading your packages before me - and maybe fixing some other bugs in the process! I've posted the list of packages (sorted by ddlist) to debian-devel@lists.d.o, see https://lists.debian.org/debian-devel/2020/12/msg00419.html. Many thanks to Ivo and the whole Release Team for their support of Reproducible Builds and generally speaking for the many many enhancements to the release process we've seen over the years. Debian in 2021 will rock'n'roll more than ever! So thank you all, once again, for making Debian what it is and what it will be!

18 December 2020

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, November 2020

A Debian LTS logo Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS. Individual reports In November, 239.25 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available: Evolution of the situation In November we held the last LTS team meeting for 2020 on IRC, with the next one coming up at the end of January.
We announced a new formalized initiative for Funding Debian projects with money from Freexian s LTS service.
Finally, we would like to remark once again that we are constantly looking for new contributors. Please contact Holger if you are interested! We re also glad to welcome two new sponsors, Moxa, a device manufacturer, and a French research lab (Institut des Sciences Cognitives Marc Jeannerod). The security tracker currently lists 37 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 40 packages needing an update. Thanks to our sponsors Sponsors that joined recently are in bold.

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27 November 2020

Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 162 released

The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 162. This version includes the following changes:
[ Chris Lamb ]
* Don't depends on radare2 in the Debian autopkgtests as it will not be in
  bullseye due to security considerations (#950372). (Closes: #975313)
* Avoid "Command  s p a c e d o u t  failed" messages when creating an
  artificial CalledProcessError instance in our generic from_operation
  feeder creator.
* Overhaul long and short descriptions.
* Use the operation's full name so that "command failed" messages include
  its arguments.
* Add a missing comma in a comment.
[ Jelmer Vernoo  ]
* Add missing space to the error message when only one argument is passed to
  diffoscope.
[ Holger Levsen ]
* Update Standards-Version to 4.5.1.
[ Mattia Rizzolo ]
* Split the diffoscope package into a diffoscope-minimal package that
  excludes the larger packages from Recommends. (Closes: #975261)
* Drop support for Python 3.6.
You find out more by visiting the project homepage.

17 November 2020

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, October 2020

A Debian LTS logo Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS. Individual reports In October, 221.50 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available: Evolution of the situation October was a regular LTS month with a LTS team meeting done via video chat thus there s no log to be shared. After more than five years of contributing to LTS (and ELTS), Mike Gabriel announced that he founded a new company called Frei(e) Software GmbH and thus would leave us to concentrate on this new endeavor. Best of luck with that, Mike! So, once again, this is a good moment to remind that we are constantly looking for new contributors. Please contact Holger if you are interested! The security tracker currently lists 42 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 39 packages needing an update. Thanks to our sponsors Sponsors that joined recently are in bold.

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11 November 2020

Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in October 2020

Welcome to the October 2020 report from the Reproducible Builds project. In our monthly reports, we outline the major things that we have been up to over the past month. As a brief reminder, the motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to ensure flaws have not been introduced in the binaries we install on our systems. If you are interested in contributing to the project, please visit our main website.

General On Saturday 10th October, Morten Linderud gave a talk at Arch Conf Online 2020 on The State of Reproducible Builds in Arch. The video should be available later this month, but as a teaser:
The previous year has seen great progress in Arch Linux to get reproducible builds in the hands of the users and developers. In this talk we will explore the current tooling that allows users to reproduce packages, the rebuilder software that has been written to check packages and the current issues in this space.
During the Reproducible Builds summit in Marrakesh in 2019, developers from the GNU Guix, NixOS and Debian distributions were able to produce a bit-for-bit identical GNU Mes binary despite using three different versions of GCC. Since this summit, additional work resulted in a bit-for-bit identical Mes binary using tcc, and last month a fuller update was posted to this effect by the individuals involved. This month, however, David Wheeler updated his extensive page on Fully Countering Trusting Trust through Diverse Double-Compiling, remarking that:
GNU Mes rebuild is definitely an application of [Diverse Double-Compiling]. [..] This is an awesome application of DDC, and I believe it s the first publicly acknowledged use of DDC on a binary
There was a small, followup discussion on our mailing list. In openSUSE, Bernhard M. Wiedemann published his monthly Reproducible Builds status update. This month, the Reproducible Builds project restarted our IRC meetings, managing to convene twice: the first time on October 12th (summary & logs), and later on the 26th (logs). As mentioned in previous reports, due to the unprecedented events throughout 2020, there will be no in-person summit event this year. On our mailing list this month El as Alejandro posted a request for help with a local configuration

Software development This month, we tried to fix a large number of currently-unreproducible packages, including: Bernhard M. Wiedemann also reported three issues against bison, ibus and postgresql12.

Tools diffoscope is our in-depth and content-aware diff utility. Not only could you locate and diagnose reproducibility issues, it provides human-readable diffs of all kinds too. This month, Chris Lamb uploaded version 161 to Debian (later backported by Mattia Rizzolo), as well as made the following changes:
  • Move test_ocaml to the assert_diff helper. [ ]
  • Update tests to support OCaml version 4.11.1. Thanks to Sebastian Ramacher for the report. (#972518)
  • Bump minimum version of the Black source code formatter to 20.8b1. (#972518)
In addition, Jean-Romain Garnier temporarily updated the dependency on radare2 to ensure our test pipelines continue to work [ ], and for the GNU Guix distribution Vagrant Cascadian diffoscope to version 161 [ ]. In related development, trydiffoscope is the web-based version of diffoscope. This month, Chris Lamb made the following changes:
  • Mark a --help-only test as being a superficial test. (#971506)
  • Add a real, albeit flaky, test that interacts with the try.diffoscope.org service. [ ]
  • Bump debhelper compatibility level to 13 [ ] and bump Standards-Version to 4.5.0 [ ].
Lastly, disorderfs version 0.5.10-2 was uploaded to Debian unstable by Holger Levsen, which enabled security hardening via DEB_BUILD_MAINT_OPTIONS [ ] and dropped debian/disorderfs.lintian-overrides [ ].

Website and documentation This month, a number of updates to the main Reproducible Builds website and related documentation were made by Chris Lamb:
  • Add a citation link to the academic article regarding dettrace [ ], and added yet another supply-chain security attack publication [ ].
  • Reformatted the Jekyll s Liquid templating language and CSS formatting to be consistent [ ] as well as expand a number of tab characters [ ].
  • Used relative_url to fix missing translation icon on various pages. [ ]
  • Published two announcement blog posts regarding the restarting of our IRC meetings. [ ][ ]
  • Added an explicit note regarding the lack of an in-person summit in 2020 to our events page. [ ]

Testing framework The Reproducible Builds project operates a Jenkins-based testing framework that powers tests.reproducible-builds.org. This month, Holger Levsen made the following changes:
  • Debian-related changes:
    • Refactor and improve the Debian dashboard. [ ][ ][ ]
    • Track bugs which are usertagged as filesystem , fixfilepath , etc.. [ ][ ][ ]
    • Make a number of changes to package index pages. [ ][ ][ ]
  • System health checks:
    • Relax disk space warning levels. [ ]
    • Specifically detect build failures reported by dpkg-buildpackage. [ ]
    • Fix a regular expression to detect outdated package sets. [ ]
    • Detect Lintian issues in diffoscope. [ ]
  • Misc:
    • Make a number of updates to reflect that our sponsor Profitbricks has renamed itself to IONOS. [ ][ ][ ][ ]
    • Run a F-Droid maintenance routine twice a month to utilise its cleanup features. [ ]
    • Fix the target name in OpenWrt builds to ath79 from ath97. [ ]
    • Add a missing Postfix configuration for a node. [ ]
    • Temporarily disable Arch Linux builds until a core node is back. [ ]
    • Make a number of changes to our thanks page. [ ][ ][ ]
Build node maintenance was performed by both Holger Levsen [ ][ ] and Vagrant Cascadian [ ][ ][ ], Vagrant Cascadian also updated the page listing the variations made when testing to reflect changes for in build paths [ ] and Hans-Christoph Steiner made a number of changes for F-Droid, the free software app repository for Android devices, including:
  • Do not fail reproducibility jobs when their cleanup tasks fail. [ ]
  • Skip libvirt-related sudo command if we are not actually running libvirt. [ ]
  • Use direct URLs in order to eliminate a useless HTTP redirect. [ ]

If you are interested in contributing to the Reproducible Builds project, please visit the Contribute page on our website. However, you can also get in touch with us via:

15 October 2020

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, September 2020

A Debian LTS logo Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS. Individual reports In September, 208.25 work hours have been dispatched among 13 paid contributors. Their reports are available: Evolution of the situation September was a regular LTS month with an IRC meeting. The security tracker currently lists 45 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 48 packages needing an update. Thanks to our sponsors Sponsors that joined recently are in bold.

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5 October 2020

Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in September 2020

Welcome to the September 2020 report from the Reproducible Builds project. In our monthly reports, we attempt to summarise the things that we have been up to over the past month, but if you are interested in contributing to the project, please visit our main website. This month, the Reproducible Builds project was pleased to announce a donation from Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) in support of its goals. ARDC s contribution will propel the Reproducible Builds project s efforts in ensuring the future health, security and sustainability of our increasingly digital society. Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) is a non-profit which was formed to further research and experimentation with digital communications using radio, with a goal of advancing the state of the art of amateur radio and to educate radio operators in these techniques. You can view the full announcement as well as more information about ARDC on their website.
In August s report, we announced that Jennifer Helsby (redshiftzero) launched a new reproduciblewheels.com website to address the lack of reproducibility of Python wheels . This month, Kushal Das posted a brief follow-up to provide an update on reproducible sources as well. The Threema privacy and security-oriented messaging application announced that within the next months , their apps will become fully open source, supporting reproducible builds :
This is to say that anyone will be able to independently review Threema s security and verify that the published source code corresponds to the downloaded app.
You can view the full announcement on Threema s website.

Events Sadly, due to the unprecedented events in 2020, there will be no in-person Reproducible Builds event this year. However, the Reproducible Builds project intends to resume meeting regularly on IRC, starting on Monday, October 12th at 18:00 UTC (full announcement). The cadence of these meetings will probably be every two weeks, although this will be discussed and decided on at the first meeting. (An editable agenda is available.) On 18th September, Bernhard M. Wiedemann gave a presentation in German titled Wie reproducible builds Software sicherer machen ( How reproducible builds make software more secure ) at the Internet Security Digital Days 2020 conference. (View video.) On Saturday 10th October, Morten Linderud will give a talk at Arch Conf Online 2020 on The State of Reproducible Builds in the Arch Linux distribution:
The previous year has seen great progress in Arch Linux to get reproducible builds in the hands of the users and developers. In this talk we will explore the current tooling that allows users to reproduce packages, the rebuilder software that has been written to check packages and the current issues in this space.
During the Reproducible Builds summit in Marrakesh, GNU Guix, NixOS and Debian were able to produce a bit-for-bit identical binary when building GNU Mes, despite using three different major versions of GCC. Since the summit, additional work resulted in a bit-for-bit identical Mes binary using tcc and this month, a fuller update was posted by the individuals involved.

Development work In openSUSE, Bernhard M. Wiedemann published his monthly Reproducible Builds status update.

Debian Chris Lamb uploaded a number of Debian packages to address reproducibility issues that he had previously provided patches for, including cfingerd (#831021), grap (#870573), splint (#924003) & schroot (#902804) Last month, an issue was identified where a large number of Debian .buildinfo build certificates had been tainted on the official Debian build servers, as these environments had files underneath the /usr/local/sbin directory to prevent the execution of system services during package builds. However, this month, Aurelien Jarno and Wouter Verhelst fixed this issue in varying ways, resulting in a special policy-rcd-declarative-deny-all package. Building on Chris Lamb s previous work on reproducible builds for Debian .ISO images, Roland Clobus announced his work in progress on making the Debian Live images reproducible. [ ] Lucas Nussbaum performed an archive-wide rebuild of packages to test enabling the reproducible=+fixfilepath Debian build flag by default. Enabling the fixfilepath feature will likely fix reproducibility issues in an estimated 500-700 packages. The test revealed only 33 packages (out of 30,000 in the archive) that fail to build with fixfilepath. Many of those will be fixed when the default LLVM/Clang version is upgraded. 79 reviews of Debian packages were added, 23 were updated and 17 were removed this month adding to our knowledge about identified issues. Chris Lamb added and categorised a number of new issue types, including packages that captures their build path via quicktest.h and absolute build directories in documentation generated by Doxygen , etc. Lastly, Lukas Puehringer s uploaded a new version of the in-toto to Debian which was sponsored by Holger Levsen. [ ]

diffoscope diffoscope is our in-depth and content-aware diff utility that can not only locate and diagnose reproducibility issues, it provides human-readable diffs of all kinds too. In September, Chris Lamb made the following changes to diffoscope, including preparing and uploading versions 159 and 160 to Debian:
  • New features:
    • Show ordering differences only in strings(1) output by applying the ordering check to all differences across the codebase. [ ]
  • Bug fixes:
    • Mark some PGP tests that they require pgpdump, and check that the associated binary is actually installed before attempting to run it. (#969753)
    • Don t raise exceptions when cleaning up after guestfs cleanup failure. [ ]
    • Ensure we check FALLBACK_FILE_EXTENSION_SUFFIX, otherwise we run pgpdump against all files that are recognised by file(1) as data. [ ]
  • Codebase improvements:
    • Add some documentation for the EXTERNAL_TOOLS dictionary. [ ]
    • Abstract out a variable we use a couple of times. [ ]
  • diffoscope.org website improvements:
    • Make the (long) demonstration GIF less prominent on the page. [ ]
In addition, Paul Spooren added support for automatically deploying Docker images. [ ]

Website and documentation This month, a number of updates to the main Reproducible Builds website and related documentation. Chris Lamb made the following changes: In addition, Holger Levsen re-added the documentation link to the top-level navigation [ ] and documented that the jekyll-polyglot package is required [ ]. Lastly, diffoscope.org and reproducible-builds.org were transferred to Software Freedom Conservancy. Many thanks to Brett Smith from Conservancy, J r my Bobbio (lunar) and Holger Levsen for their help with transferring and to Mattia Rizzolo for initiating this.

Upstream patches The Reproducible Builds project detects, dissects and attempts to fix as many currently-unreproducible packages as possible. We endeavour to send all of our patches upstream where appropriate. This month, we wrote a large number of these patches, including: Bernhard M. Wiedemann also reported issues in git2-rs, pyftpdlib, python-nbclient, python-pyzmq & python-sidpy.

Testing framework The Reproducible Builds project operates a Jenkins-based testing framework to power tests.reproducible-builds.org. This month, Holger Levsen made the following changes:
  • Debian:
    • Shorten the subject of nodes have gone offline notification emails. [ ]
    • Also track bugs that have been usertagged with usrmerge. [ ]
    • Drop abort-related codepaths as that functionality has been removed from Jenkins. [ ]
    • Update the frequency we update base images and status pages. [ ][ ][ ][ ]
  • Status summary view page:
    • Add support for monitoring systemctl status [ ] and the number of diffoscope processes [ ].
    • Show the total number of nodes [ ] and colourise critical disk space situations [ ].
    • Improve the visuals with respect to vertical space. [ ][ ]
  • Debian rebuilder prototype:
    • Resume building random packages again [ ] and update the frequency that packages are rebuilt. [ ][ ]
    • Use --no-respect-build-path parameter until sbuild 0.81 is available. [ ]
    • Treat the inability to locate some packages as a debrebuild problem, and not as a issue with the rebuilder itself. [ ]
  • Arch Linux:
    • Update various components to be compatible with Arch Linux s move to the xz compression format. [ ][ ][ ]
    • Allow scheduling of old packages to catch up on the backlog. [ ][ ][ ]
    • Improve formatting on the summary page. [ ][ ]
    • Update HTML pages once every hour, not every 30 minutes. [ ]
    • Use the Ubuntu (!) GPG keyserver to validate packages. [ ]
  • System health checks:
    • Highlight important bad conditions in colour. [ ][ ]
    • Add support for detecting more problems, including Jenkins shutdown issues [ ], failure to upgrade Arch Linux packages [ ], kernels with wrong permissions [ ], etc.
  • Misc:
    • Delete old schroot sessions after 2 days, not 3. [ ]
    • Use sudo to cleanup diffoscope schroot sessions. [ ]
In addition, stefan0xC fixed a query for unknown results in the handling of Arch Linux packages [ ] and Mattia Rizzolo updated the template that notifies maintainers by email of their newly-unreproducible packages to ensure that it did not get caught in junk/spam folders [ ]. Finally, build node maintenance was performed by Holger Levsen [ ][ ][ ][ ], Mattia Rizzolo [ ][ ] and Vagrant Cascadian [ ][ ][ ].
If you are interested in contributing to the Reproducible Builds project, please visit our Contribute page on our website. However, you can get in touch with us via:

15 September 2020

Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2020

A Debian LTS logo Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS. Individual reports In August, 237.25 work hours have been dispatched among 14 paid contributors. Their reports are available: Evolution of the situation August was a regular LTS month once again, even though it was only our 2nd month with Stretch LTS.
At the end of August some of us participated in DebConf 20 online where we held our monthly team meeting. A video is available.
As of now this video is also the only public resource about the LTS survey we held in July, though a written summary is expected to be released soon. The security tracker currently lists 56 packages with a known CVE and the dla-needed.txt file has 55 packages needing an update. Thanks to our sponsors Sponsors that recently joined are in bold.

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9 September 2020

Reproducible Builds: Reproducible Builds in August 2020

Welcome to the August 2020 report from the Reproducible Builds project. In our monthly reports, we summarise the things that we have been up to over the past month. The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to ensure no flaws have been introduced from the original free software source code to the pre-compiled binaries we install on our systems. If you re interested in contributing to the project, please visit our main website.


This month, Jennifer Helsby launched a new reproduciblewheels.com website to address the lack of reproducibility of Python wheels. To quote Jennifer s accompanying explanatory blog post:
One hiccup we ve encountered in SecureDrop development is that not all Python wheels can be built reproducibly. We ship multiple (Python) projects in Debian packages, with Python dependencies included in those packages as wheels. In order for our Debian packages to be reproducible, we need that wheel build process to also be reproducible
Parallel to this, transparencylog.com was also launched, a service that verifies the contents of URLs against a publicly recorded cryptographic log. It keeps an append-only log of the cryptographic digests of all URLs it has seen. (GitHub repo) On 18th September, Bernhard M. Wiedemann will give a presentation in German, titled Wie reproducible builds Software sicherer machen ( How reproducible builds make software more secure ) at the Internet Security Digital Days 2020 conference.

Reproducible builds at DebConf20 There were a number of talks at the recent online-only DebConf20 conference on the topic of reproducible builds. Holger gave a talk titled Reproducing Bullseye in practice , focusing on independently verifying that the binaries distributed from ftp.debian.org are made from their claimed sources. It also served as a general update on the status of reproducible builds within Debian. The video (145 MB) and slides are available. There were also a number of other talks that involved Reproducible Builds too. For example, the Malayalam language mini-conference had a talk titled , ? ( I want to join Debian, what should I do? ) presented by Praveen Arimbrathodiyil, the Clojure Packaging Team BoF session led by Elana Hashman, as well as Where is Salsa CI right now? that was on the topic of Salsa, the collaborative development server that Debian uses to provide the necessary tools for package maintainers, packaging teams and so on. Jonathan Bustillos (Jathan) also gave a talk in Spanish titled Un camino verificable desde el origen hasta el binario ( A verifiable path from source to binary ). (Video, 88MB)

Development work After many years of development work, the compiler for the Rust programming language now generates reproducible binary code. This generated some general discussion on Reddit on the topic of reproducibility in general. Paul Spooren posted a request for comments to OpenWrt s openwrt-devel mailing list asking for clarification on when to raise the PKG_RELEASE identifier of a package. This is needed in order to successfully perform rebuilds in a reproducible builds context. In openSUSE, Bernhard M. Wiedemann published his monthly Reproducible Builds status update. Chris Lamb provided some comments and pointers on an upstream issue regarding the reproducibility of a Snap / SquashFS archive file. [ ]

Debian Holger Levsen identified that a large number of Debian .buildinfo build certificates have been tainted on the official Debian build servers, as these environments have files underneath the /usr/local/sbin directory [ ]. He also filed against bug for debrebuild after spotting that it can fail to download packages from snapshot.debian.org [ ]. This month, several issues were uncovered (or assisted) due to the efforts of reproducible builds. For instance, Debian bug #968710 was filed by Simon McVittie, which describes a problem with detached debug symbol files (required to generate a traceback) that is unlikely to have been discovered without reproducible builds. In addition, Jelmer Vernooij called attention that the new Debian Janitor tool is using the property of reproducibility (as well as diffoscope when applying archive-wide changes to Debian:
New merge proposals also include a link to the diffoscope diff between a vanilla build and the build with changes. Unfortunately these can be a bit noisy for packages that are not reproducible yet, due to the difference in build environment between the two builds. [ ]
56 reviews of Debian packages were added, 38 were updated and 24 were removed this month adding to our knowledge about identified issues. Specifically, Chris Lamb added and categorised the nondeterministic_version_generated_by_python_param and the lessc_nondeterministic_keys toolchain issues. [ ][ ] Holger Levsen sponsored Lukas Puehringer s upload of the python-securesystemslib pacage, which is a dependency of in-toto, a framework to secure the integrity of software supply chains. [ ] Lastly, Chris Lamb further refined his merge request against the debian-installer component to allow all arguments from sources.list files (such as [check-valid-until=no]) in order that we can test the reproducibility of the installer images on the Reproducible Builds own testing infrastructure and sent a ping to the team that maintains that code.

Upstream patches The Reproducible Builds project detects, dissects and attempts to fix as many currently-unreproducible packages as possible. We endeavour to send all of our patches upstream where appropriate. This month, we wrote a large number of these patches, including:

diffoscope diffoscope is our in-depth and content-aware diff utility that can not only locate and diagnose reproducibility issues, it provides human-readable diffs of all kinds. In August, Chris Lamb made the following changes to diffoscope, including preparing and uploading versions 155, 156, 157 and 158 to Debian:
  • New features:
    • Support extracting data of PGP signed data. (#214)
    • Try files named .pgp against pgpdump(1) to determine whether they are Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) files. (#211)
    • Support multiple options for all file extension matching. [ ]
  • Bug fixes:
    • Don t raise an exception when we encounter XML files with <!ENTITY> declarations inside the Document Type Definition (DTD), or when a DTD or entity references an external resource. (#212)
    • pgpdump(1) can successfully parse some binary files, so check that the parsed output contains something sensible before accepting it. [ ]
    • Temporarily drop gnumeric from the Debian build-dependencies as it has been removed from the testing distribution. (#968742)
    • Correctly use fallback_recognises to prevent matching .xsb binary XML files.
    • Correct identify signed PGP files as file(1) returns data . (#211)
  • Logging improvements:
    • Emit a message when ppudump version does not match our file header. [ ]
    • Don t use Python s repr(object) output in Calling external command messages. [ ]
    • Include the filename in the not identified by any comparator message. [ ]
  • Codebase improvements:
    • Bump Python requirement from 3.6 to 3.7. Most distributions are either shipping with Python 3.5 or 3.7, so supporting 3.6 is not only somewhat unnecessary but also cumbersome to test locally. [ ]
    • Drop some unused imports [ ], drop an unnecessary dictionary comprehensions [ ] and some unnecessary control flow [ ].
    • Correct typo of output in a comment. [ ]
  • Release process:
    • Move generation of debian/tests/control to an external script. [ ]
    • Add some URLs for the site that will appear on PyPI.org. [ ]
    • Update author and author email in setup.py for PyPI.org and similar. [ ]
  • Testsuite improvements:
    • Update PPU tests for compatibility with Free Pascal versions 3.2.0 or greater. (#968124)
    • Mark that our identification test for .ppu files requires ppudump version 3.2.0 or higher. [ ]
    • Add an assert_diff helper that loads and compares a fixture output. [ ][ ][ ][ ]
  • Misc:
In addition, Mattia Rizzolo documented in setup.py that diffoscope works with Python version 3.8 [ ] and Frazer Clews applied some Pylint suggestions [ ] and removed some deprecated methods [ ].

Website This month, Chris Lamb updated the main Reproducible Builds website and documentation to:
  • Clarify & fix a few entries on the who page [ ][ ] and ensure that images do not get to large on some viewports [ ].
  • Clarify use of a pronoun re. Conservancy. [ ]
  • Use View all our monthly reports over View all monthly reports . [ ]
  • Move a is a suffix out of the link target on the SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH age. [ ]
In addition, Javier Jard n added the freedesktop-sdk project [ ] and Kushal Das added SecureDrop project [ ] to our projects page. Lastly, Michael P hn added internationalisation and translation support with help from Hans-Christoph Steiner [ ].

Testing framework The Reproducible Builds project operate a Jenkins-based testing framework to power tests.reproducible-builds.org. This month, Holger Levsen made the following changes:
  • System health checks:
    • Improve explanation how the status and scores are calculated. [ ][ ]
    • Update and condense view of detected issues. [ ][ ]
    • Query the canonical configuration file to determine whether a job is disabled instead of duplicating/hardcoding this. [ ]
    • Detect several problems when updating the status of reporting-oriented metapackage sets. [ ]
    • Detect when diffoscope is not installable [ ] and failures in DNS resolution [ ].
  • Debian:
    • Update the URL to the Debian security team bug tracker s Git repository. [ ]
    • Reschedule the unstable and bullseye distributions often for the arm64 architecture. [ ]
    • Schedule buster less often for armhf. [ ][ ][ ]
    • Force the build of certain packages in the work-in-progress package rebuilder. [ ][ ]
    • Only update the stretch and buster base build images when necessary. [ ]
  • Other distributions:
    • For F-Droid, trigger jobs by commits, not by a timer. [ ]
    • Disable the Archlinux HTML page generation job as it has never worked. [ ]
    • Disable the alternative OpenWrt rebuilder jobs. [ ]
  • Misc;
Many other changes were made too, including:
  • Chris Lamb:
    • Use <pre> HTML tags when dumping fixed-width debugging data in the self-serve package scheduler. [ ]
  • Mattia Rizzolo:
  • Vagrant Cascadian:
    • Mark that the u-boot Universal Boot Loader should not build architecture independent packages on the arm64 architecture anymore. [ ]
Finally, build node maintenance was performed by Holger Levsen [ ], Mattia Rizzolo [ ][ ] and Vagrant Cascadian [ ][ ][ ][ ]

Mailing list On our mailing list this month, Leo Wandersleb sent a message to the list after he was wondering how to expand his WalletScrutiny.com project (which aims to improve the security of Bitcoin wallets) from Android wallets to also monitor Linux wallets as well:
If you think you know how to spread the word about reproducibility in the context of Bitcoin wallets through WalletScrutiny, your contributions are highly welcome on this PR [ ]
Julien Lepiller posted to the list linking to a blog post by Tavis Ormandy titled You don t need reproducible builds. Morten Linderud (foxboron) responded with a clear rebuttal that Tavis was only considering the narrow use-case of proprietary vendors and closed-source software. He additionally noted that the criticism that reproducible builds cannot prevent against backdoors being deliberately introduced into the upstream source ( bugdoors ) are decidedly (and deliberately) outside the scope of reproducible builds to begin with. Chris Lamb included the Reproducible Builds mailing list in a wider discussion regarding a tentative proposal to include .buildinfo files in .deb packages, adding his remarks regarding requiring a custom tool in order to determine whether generated build artifacts are identical in a reproducible context. [ ] Jonathan Bustillos (Jathan) posted a quick email to the list requesting whether there was a list of To do tasks in Reproducible Builds. Lastly, Chris Lamb responded at length to a query regarding the status of reproducible builds for Debian ISO or installation images. He noted that most of the technical work has been performed but there are at least four issues until they can be generally advertised as such . He pointed that the privacy-oriented Tails operation system, which is based directly on Debian, has had reproducible builds for a number of years now. [ ]

If you are interested in contributing to the Reproducible Builds project, please visit our Contribute page on our website. However, you can get in touch with us via:

8 August 2020

Holger Levsen: 20200808-debconf8

DebConf8 This tshirt is 12 years old and from DebConf8. DebConf8 was my 6th DebConf and took place in Mar de la Plata, Argentina. Also this is my 6th post in this series of posts about DebConfs and for the last two days for the first time I failed my plan to do one post per day. And while two days ago I still planned to catch up on this by doing more than one post in a day, I have now decided to give in to realities, which mostly translates to sudden fantastic weather in Hamburg and other summer related changes in life. So yeah, I still plan to do short posts about all the DebConfs I was lucky to attend, but there might be days without a blog post. Anyhow, Mar de la Plata. When we held DebConf in Argentina it was winter there, meaning locals and other folks would wear jackets, scarfs, probably gloves, while many Debian folks not so much. Andreas Tille freaked out and/or amazed local people by going swimming in the sea every morning. And when I told Stephen Gran that even I would find it a bit cold with just a tshirt he replied "na, the weather is fine, just like british summer", while it was 14 celcius and mildly raining. DebConf8 was the first time I've met Valessio Brito, who I had worked together since at least DebConf6. That meeting was really super nice, Valessio is such a lovely person. Back in 2008 however, there was just one problem: his spoken English was worse than his written one, and that was already hard to parse sometimes. Fast forward eleven years to Curitiba last year and boom, Valessio speaks really nice English now. And, you might wonder why I'm telling this, especially if you were exposed to my Spanish back then and also now. So my point in telling this story about Valessio is to illustrate two things: a.) one can contribute to Debian without speaking/writing much English, Valessio did lots of great artwork since DebConf6 and b.) one can learn English by doing Debian stuff. It worked for me too! During set up of the conference there was one very memorable moment, some time after the openssl maintainer, Kurt Roeckx arrived at the venue: Shortly before DebConf8 Luciano Bello, from Argentina no less, had found CVE-2008-0166 which basically compromised the security of sshd of all Debian and Ubuntu installations done in the last 4 years (IIRC two Debian releases were affected) and which was commented heavily and noticed everywhere. So poor Kurt arrived and wondered whether we would all hate him, how many toilets he would have to clean and what not... And then, someone rather quickly noticed this, approached some people and suddenly a bunch of people at DebConf were group-hugging Kurt and then we were all smiling and continuing doing set up of the conference. That moment is one of my most joyful memories of all DebConfs and partly explains why I remember little about the conference itself, everything else pales in comparison and most things pale over the years anyway. As I remember it, the conference ran very smoothly in the end, despite quite some organisational problems right before the start. But as usual, once the geeks arrive and are happily geeking, things start to run smooth, also because Debian people are kind and smart and give hands and brain were needed. And like other DebConfs, Mar de la Plata also had moments which I want to share but I will only hint about, so it's up to you to imagine the special leaves which were brought to that cheese and wine party! ;-) Update: added another xkcd link, spelled out Kurt's name after talking to him and added a link to a video of the group hug.

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