Search Results: "Faidon Liambotis"

12 April 2016

Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible builds: week 48 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the reproducible builds effort between March 20th and March 26th: Toolchain fixes Daniel Kahn Gillmor worked on removing build path from build symbols submitting a patch adding -fdebug-prefix-map to clang to match GCC, another patch against gcc-5 to backport the removal of -fdebug-prefix-map from DW_AT_producer, and finally by proposing the addition of a normalizedebugpath to the reproducible feature set of dpkg-buildflags that would use -fdebug-prefix-map to replace the current directory with . using -fdebug-prefix-map. Sergey Poznyakoff merged the --clamp-mtime option so that it will be featured in the next Tar release. This option is likely to be used by dpkg-deb to implement deterministic mtimes for packaged files. Packages fixed The following packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: augeas, gmtkbabel, ktikz, octave-control, octave-general, octave-image, octave-ltfat, octave-miscellaneous, octave-mpi, octave-nurbs, octave-octcdf, octave-sockets, octave-strings, openlayers, python-structlog, signond. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet: tests.reproducible-builds.org i386 build nodes have been setup by converting 2 of the 4 amd64 nodes to i386. (h01ger) Package reviews 92 reviews have been removed, 66 added and 31 updated in the previous week. New issues: timestamps_generated_by_xbean_spring, timestamps_generated_by_mangosdk_spiprocessor. Chris Lamb filed 7 FTBFS bugs. Misc. On March 20th, Chris Lamb gave a talk at FOSSASIA 2016 in Singapore. The very same day, but a few timezones apart, h01ger did a presentation at LibrePlanet 2016 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Seven GSoC/Outreachy applications were made by potential interns to work on various aspects of the reproducible builds effort. On top of interacting with several applicants, prospective mentors gathered to review the applications.

27 March 2016

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 48 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the reproducible builds effort between March 20th and March 26th:

Toolchain fixes
  • Sebastian Ramacher uploaded breathe/4.2.0-1 which makes its output deterministic. Original patch by Chris Lamb, merged uptream.
  • Rafael Laboissiere uploaded octave/4.0.1-1 which allows packages to be built in place and avoid unreproducible builds due to temporary build directories appearing in the .oct files.
Daniel Kahn Gillmor worked on removing build path from build symbols submitting a patch adding -fdebug-prefix-map to clang to match GCC, another patch against gcc-5 to backport the removal of -fdebug-prefix-map from DW_AT_producer, and finally by proposing the addition of a normalizedebugpath to the reproducible feature set of dpkg-buildflags that would use -fdebug-prefix-map to replace the current directory with . using -fdebug-prefix-map. As succesful result of lobbying at LibrePlanet 2016, the --clamp-mtime option will be featured in the next Tar release. This option is likely to be used by dpkg-deb to implement deterministic mtimes for packaged files.

Packages fixed The following packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: augeas, gmtkbabel, ktikz, octave-control, octave-general, octave-image, octave-ltfat, octave-miscellaneous, octave-mpi, octave-nurbs, octave-octcdf, octave-sockets, octave-strings, openlayers, python-structlog, signond. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet:
  • #818742 on milkytracker by Reiner Herrmann: sorts the list of source files.
  • #818752 on tcl8.4 by Reiner Herrmann: sort source files using C locale.
  • #818753 on tk8.6 by Reiner Herrmann: sort source files using C locale.
  • #818754 on tk8.5 by Reiner Herrmann: sort source files using C locale.
  • #818755 on tk8.4 by Reiner Herrmann: sort source files using C locale.
  • #818952 on marionnet by ceridwen: dummy out build date and uname to make build reproducible.
  • #819334 on avahi by Reiner Herrmann: ship upstream changelog instead of the one generated by gettextize (although duplicate of #804141 by Santiago Vila).

tests.reproducible-builds.org i386 build nodes have been setup by converting 2 of the 4 amd64 nodes to i386. (h01ger)

Package reviews 92 reviews have been removed, 66 added and 31 updated in the previous week. New issues: timestamps_generated_by_xbean_spring, timestamps_generated_by_mangosdk_spiprocessor. Chris Lamb filed 7 FTBFS bugs.

Misc. On March 20th, Chris Lamb gave a talk at FOSSASIA 2016 in Singapore. The very same day, but a few timezones apart, h01ger did a presentation at LibrePlanet 2016 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Seven GSoC/Outreachy applications were made by potential interns to work on various aspects of the reproducible builds effort. On top of interacting with several applicants, prospective mentors gathered to review the applications. Huge thanks to Linda Naeun Lee for the new hackergotchi visible on Planet Debian.

08 February 2016

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 41 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the reproducible builds effort this week:

Toolchain fixes After remarks from Guillem Jover, Lunar updated his patch adding generation of .buildinfo files in dpkg.

Packages fixed The following packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: dracut, ent, gdcm, guilt, lazarus, magit, matita, resource-agents, rurple-ng, shadow, shorewall-doc, udiskie. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed:
  • disque/1.0~rc1-5 by Chris Lamb, noticed by Reiner Herrmann.
  • dlm/4.0.4-2 by Ferenc W gner.
  • drbd-utils/8.9.6-1 by Apollon Oikonomopoulos.
  • java-common/0.54 by by Emmanuel Bourg.
  • libjibx1.2-java/1.2.6-1 by Emmanuel Bourg.
  • libzstd/0.4.7-1 by Kevin Murray.
  • python-releases/1.0.0-1 by Jan Dittberner.
  • redis/2:3.0.7-2 by Chris Lamb, noticed by Reiner Herrmann.
  • tetex-brev/4.22.github.20140417-3 by Petter Reinholdtsen.
Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them:
  • anarchism/14.0-4 by Holger Levsen.
  • hhvm/3.11.1+dfsg-1 by Faidon Liambotis.
  • netty/1:4.0.34-1 by Emmanuel Bourg.
Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet:
  • #813309 on lapack by Reiner Herrmann: removes the test log and sorts the files packed into the static library locale-independently.
  • #813345 on elastix by akira: suggest to use the $datetime placeholder in Doxygen footer.
  • #813892 on dietlibc by Reiner Herrmann: remove gzip headers, sort md5sums file, and sort object files linked in static libraries.
  • #813912 on git by Reiner Herrmann: remove timestamps from documentation generated with asciidoc, remove gzip headers, and sort md5sums and tclIndex files.

reproducible.debian.net For the first time, we've reached more than 20,000 packages with reproducible builds for sid on amd64 with our current test framework. Vagrant Cascadian has set up another test system for armhf. Enabling four more builder jobs to be added to Jenkins. (h01ger)

Package reviews 233 reviews have been removed, 111 added and 86 updated in the previous week. 36 new FTBFS bugs were reported by Chris Lamb and Alastair McKinstry. New issue: timestamps_in_manpages_generated_by_yat2m. The description for the blacklisted_on_jenkins issue has been improved. Some packages are also now tagged with blacklisted_on_jenkins_armhf_only.

Misc. Steven Chamberlain gave an update on the status of FreeBSD and variants after the BSD devroom at FOSDEM 16. He also discussed how jails can be used for easier and faster reproducibility tests. The video for h01ger's talk in the main track of FOSDEM 16 about the reproducible ecosystem is now available.

04 January 2016

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 36 in Stretch cycle

What happened in the reproducible builds effort between December 27th and January 2nd: Infrastructure dak now silently accepts and discards .buildinfo files (commit 1, 2), thanks to Niels Thykier and Ansgar Burchardt. This was later confirmed as working by Mattia Rizzolo. Packages fixed The following packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: banshee-community-extensions, javamail, mono-debugger-libs, python-avro. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Untested changes: reproducible.debian.net The testing distribution (the upcoming stretch) is now tested on armhf. (h01ger) Four new armhf build nodes provided by Vagrant Cascandian were integrated in the infrastructer. This allowed for 9 new armhf builder jobs. (h01ger) The RPM-based build system, koji, is now in unstable and testing. (Marek Marczykowski-G recki, Ximin Luo). Package reviews 131 reviews have been removed, 71 added and 53 updated in the previous week. 58 new FTBFS reports were made by Chris Lamb and Chris West. New issues identified this week: nondeterminstic_ordering_in_gsettings_glib_enums_xml, nondeterminstic_output_in_warnings_generated_by_breathe, qt_translate_noop_nondeterminstic_ordering. Misc. Steven Chamberlain explained in length why reproducible cross-building across architectures mattered, and posted results of his tests comparing a stage1 debootstrapped chroot of linux-i386 once done from official Debian packages, the others cross-built from kfreebsd-amd64.

11 December 2015

Lunar: Reproducible builds: week 32 in Stretch cycle

The first reproducible world summit was held in Athens, Greece, from December 1st-3rd with the support of the Linux Foundation, the Open Tech Fund, and Google. Faidon Liambotis has been an amazing help to sort out all local details. People at ImpactHub Athens have been perfect hosts. North of Athens from the Acropolis with ImpactHub in the center Nearly 40 participants from 14 different free software project had very busy days sharing knowledge, building understanding, and producing actual patches. Anyone interested in cross project discussions should join the rb-general mailing-list. What follows focuses mostly on what happened for Debian this previous week. A more detailed report about the summit will follow soon. You can also read the ones from Joachim Breitner from Debian, Clemens Lang from MacPorts, Georg Koppen from Tor, Dhiru Kholia from Fedora, and Ludovic Court s wrote one for Guix and for the GNU project. The Acropolis from  Infrastructure Several discussions at the meeting helped refine a shared understanding of what kind of information should be recorded on a build, and how they could be used. Daniel Kahn Gillmor sent a detailed update on how .buildinfo files should become part of the Debian archive. Some key changes compared to what we had in mind at DebConf15: Hopefully, ftpmasters will be able to comment on the updated proposal soon. Packages fixed The following packages have become reproducible due to changes in their build dependencies: fades, triplane, caml-crush, globus-authz. The following packages became reproducible after getting fixed: Some uploads fixed some reproducibility issues, but not all of them: Patches submitted which have not made their way to the archive yet: akira sent proposals on how to make bash reproducible. Alexander Couzens submitted a patch upstream to add support for SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH in grub image generator (#787795). reproducible.debian.net An issue with some armhf build nodes was tracked down to a bad interaction between uname26 personality and new glibc (Vagrant Cascadian). A Debian package was created for koji, the RPM building and tracking system used by Fedora amongst others. It is currently waiting for review in the NEW queue. (Ximin Luo, Marek Marczykowski-G recki) diffoscope development diffoscope now has a dedicated mailing list to better accommodate its growing user and developer base. Going through diffoscope's guts together enabled several new contributors. Baptiste Daroussin, Ed Maste, Clemens Lang, Mike McQuaid, Joachim Breitner all contributed their first patches to improve portability or add new features. Regular contributors Chris Lamb, Reiner Herrmann, and Levente Polyak also submitted improvements. diffoscope hacking session in Athens The next release should support more operating systems, filesystem image comparison via libguestfs, HTML reports with on-demand loading, and parallel processing for the most noticeable improvements. Package reviews 27 reviews have been removed, 17 added and 14 updated in the previous week. Chris Lamb and Val Lorentz filed 4 new FTBFS reports. Misc. Baptiste Daroussin has started to implement support for SOURCE_DATE_EPOCH in FreeBSD in libpkg and the ports tree. Thanks Joachim Breitner and h01ger for the pictures.

04 February 2012

Stefano Zacchiroli: bits from the DPL for January 2012

Fresh from the oven, monthly report of what I've been working on as DPL during January 2012.
Dear Developers,
here is another monthly report of what happened in DPL-land, this time for January 2012. There's quite a bit to report about --- including an insane amount of legal-ish stuff --- so please bear with me. Or not. Legal stuff Most of the above wouldn't have been possible without the precious help of folks at SFLC working for SPI and Debian. Be sure to thank SFLC for what they're doing for us and many other Free Software projects. Coordination Nobody stepped up to coordinate the artwork collection for Wheezy I've mentioned last month, so I've tried to do a little bit of that myself. The -publicity team is now preparing the call for artwork and hopefully we'll send it out RSN. In case you want to help, there is still a lot of room for that; just show up on the debian-desktop mailing list. Sprints A Debian Med sprint has happened in January, and Andreas Tille has provided a nice and detailed report about it. Some more sprints are forthcoming this spring, how about yours? Money Important stuff going on Other important stuff has been going on in various area of the project in January. I'd like to point your attention to a couple of things: Miscellanea In the unlikely case you've read thus far, thanks for your attention! Happy Debian hacking.
PS as usual, the boring day-to-day activity log is available at master:/srv/leader/news/bits-from-the-DPL.*

13 November 2011

Axel Beckert: grep everything

During the OpenRheinRuhr I noticed that a friend of mine didn t know about zgrep and friends. So I told him what other grep variations I know and he told me about some grep variations I didn t know about. So here s our collection of grep wrappers, derivatives and variations. First I ll list programs which search for text in different file formats:
grep through whatFixed StringsWildcards / Basic RegExpsExtended RegExpsDebian package
uncompressed text filesfgrepgrepegrepgrep
gzip-compressed text fileszfgrepzgrepzegrepzutils, gzip
bzip2-compressed text filesbzfgrepbzgrepbzegrepbzip2
xz-compressed text filesxzfgrepxzgrepxzegrepxz-utils
uncompressed text files in installed Debian packagesdfgrepdgrepdegrepdebian-goodies
gzip-compressed text files in installed Debian packages-dzgrep-debian-goodies
PDF documents--pdfgreppdfgrep
POD textspodgrep--pmtools
E-Mail folder (mbox, MH, Maildir)-mboxgrep -Gmboxgrep -Emboxgrep
Patches-grepdiffgrepdiff -Epatchutils
Process list--pgrepprocps
Gnumeric spreadsheetsssgrep -Fssgrep?gnumeric
Files in ZIP archives--zipgrepunzip
ID3 tags in MP3s--taggreppertaggrepper
Network packets--ngrepngrep
Tar archives--targrep / ptargrepperl (Experimental only for now)
And then there are also greps for special patterns on more or less normal files:
grep for whatuncompressed filescompressed filesDebian package
PCRE (Perl Compatible Regular Expression)pcregrep (see also the grep -P option)zpcregreppcregrep
IP Address in a given CIDR rangegrepcidr-grepcidr
XPath expressionxml_grep-xml-twig-tools
One question is though still unanswered for us: Is there some kind of meta-grep which chooses per file the right grep from above by looking at the MIME type of the according files, similar to xdg-open. Other tools which have grep in their name, but are too special to properly fit into the above lists: Includes contributions by Frank Hofmann and Faidon Liambotis.

18 August 2011

Raphaël Hertzog: People behind Debian: Peter Palfrader, Debian System Administrator

You might not know who Peter is because he s not very visible on Debian mailing lists. He s very active however and in particular on IRC. He was an admin of the OFTC IRC network at the time Debian switched from Freenode to OFTC. Nowadays he s a member of the Debian System Administration team who runs all the debian.org servers. If you went to a Debconf you probably met him since he s always looking for new signatures of his GPG key. He owns the best connected key in the PGP web of trust. He also wrote caff a popular GPG key signing tool. Raphael: Who are you? Peter: I m Peter Palfrader, also known as weasel. I m in my early 30s, born and raised in Innsbruck, Austria and am now living and working in Salzburg, Austria. In my copious free time, other than help running Debian s servers I also help maintaining the Tor project s infrastructure. Away from the computer I enjoy reading fiction (mostly English language Science Fiction and Fantasy), playing board games and going to the movies. Weather permitting, I also occasionally do some cycling. Raphael: How did you start contributing to Debian? Peter: I installed my first Debian the week slink came out. That was Debian 2.1 for the youngsters, in early 1999. The one thing I immediately liked about slink was that Debian s pppd supported RAS authentication which my university s dial-up system required. No way I d go back to SuSE 5.3 when I had working Internet with my Debian box. :) During that year I started getting involved in the German language Debian channel on IRCnet which got me in contact with some DDs. Christian Kurz (<shorty>) was working on Debian QA at the time and he asked my help in writing a couple of scripts. Some of that work, debcheck, still produces parts of the qa.d.o website, tho the relevance of that nowadays is probably negligible. While trying to learn more Perl earlier, I had written a program to produce syntax highlighted HTML for code snippets in various languages. I didn t really know what I was doing but it kinda worked, and probably still does since I still get mail from users every now and then. I figured that it would be really nice if people could just get my software together with Debian. According to code2html s Debian changelog the initial release of the package was done on a weekday at 2:30 in the morning early in 2000, and if my memory serves me correctly, shorty uploaded it shortly afterwards. I started packaging a couple of other piece of software and in the same year I sent my mail to the debian account managers to register my intent to become a DD. No new developers where being accepted at that time since the DAMs wanted to overhaul the entire process so I wasn t surprised to not get any immediate reply. Of course what the silence also meant was that the mail had been lost, but I only learned of that later when I took all my courage to ask DAM about the status of application a couple months later. Once that was sorted out I was assigned an AM, did the usual dance, and got my account late in November 2000. Raphael: Four years ago, the Debian System Administration team was a real bottleneck for the project and personal conflicts made it almost impossible to find solutions. You were eager to help and at some point you got dropped as a new member in that team. Can you share your story and how you managed the transition in the difficult climate at that time? Peter: Ah, that was quite the surprise for an awful lot of people, me included. Branden Robinson, who was our DPL for the 2005-2006 term, tried to get some new blood added to DSA who were at the time quite divided. He briefly talked to me on IRC some time in summer 2005, telling me I had come recommended for a role on the sysadmin team . In the course of these 15 minutes he outlined some of the issues he thought a new member of DSA would face and asked me if I thought I could help. My reply was cautiously positive, saying that I didn t want to step on anybody s toes but maybe I could be of some assistance. And that was the first and last of it, until some fine November day two years later I got an email from Phil Hands saying I ve just added you to the adm group, and added you to the debian-admin@d.o alias. and welcome on board . *blink* What!? My teammates at the time were James Troup (elmo), Phil Hands (fil), Martin Joey Schulze and Ryan Murray (neuro). The old team, while apparently not on good terms with one another, was however still around to do heavy lifting when required. I still remember when on my first or second day on the team two disks failed in the raid5 of ftp-master.debian.org aka ries. Neuro did the reinstall once new disks had arrived at Brown University. I m sure I d have been way out of my league had this job fallen to me. Fortunately my teammates were all willing and able to help me find whatever pieces of information existed that might help me learn how debian.org does its stuff. Unfortunately a lot of it only existed in various heads, or when lucky, in one of the huge mbox archives of the debian-admin alias or list. Anyway, soon I was able to get my hands dirty with upgrading from sarge to etch, which had been released about half a year earlier. Raphael: I know the DSA team has accomplished a lot over the last few years. Can you share some interesting figures? Peter: Indeed we have accomplished a lot. In my opinion the most important of these accomplishment is that we re actually once again a team nowadays. A team where people talk to one another and where nobody should be a SPoF. Since this year s debconf we are six people in the admin team: Tollef Fog Heen (Mithrandir) and Faidon Liambotis (paravoid) joined the existing members: Luca Filipozzi, Stephen Gran, Martin Zobel-Helas, and myself. Growing a core team, especially one where membership comes with uid0 on all machines, is not easy and that s why I m very glad we managed to actually do this step. I also think the infrastructure and our workflows have matured well over the last four years. We now have essential monitoring as a matter of course: Nagios not only checks whether all daemons that should be running are in fact running, but it also monitors hardware health of disks, fans, etc. where possible. We are alerted of outstanding security updates that need to be installed and of changes made to our systems that weren t then explicitly acked by one of us. We have set up a centralized configuration system, puppet, for some of our configuration that is the same, or at least similar, on all our machines. Most, if not all, pieces of software, scripts and helpers that we use on debian.org infrastructure is in publicly accessible git repositories. We have good communication with other teams in Debian that need our support, like the ftp folks or the buildd people. As for figures, I don t think there s anything spectacular. As of the time of our BoF at this year s DebConf, we take care of approximately 135 systems, about 100 of them being real iron, the other virtual machines (KVM). They are hosted at over 30 different locations, tho we are trying to cut down on that number, but that s a long and difficult process. We don t really collect a lot of other figures like web hits on www.debian.org or downloads from the ftp archive. The web team might do the former and the latter is pretty much impossible due to the distributed nature of our mirrors, as you well know. Raphael: The DSA team has a policy of eating its own dog food, i.e. you re trying to rely only on what s available in Debian. How does that work out and what are the remaining gaps? Peter: Mostly Debian, the OS, just meets our needs. Sure, the update frequency is a bit high, we probably wouldn t mind a longer release cycle. But on the other hand most software is recent enough. And when it s not, that s easy to fix with backports. If they aren t on backports.debian.org already, we ll just put them there (or ask somebody else to prepare a backport for us) and so everybody else benefits from that work too. Some things we need just don t, and probably won t, exist in Debian. These are mainly proprietary hardware health checks like HP s tools for their servers, or various vendors programs to query their raid controller. HP actually makes packages for their stuff which is very nice, but other things we just put into /usr/local, or if we really need it on a number of machines, package ourselves. The push to cripple our installers and kernels by removing firmware was quite annoying, since it made installing from the official media next to impossible in some cases. Support for working around these limitations has improved with squeeze so that s probably ok now. One of the other problems is that especially on embedded platforms most of the buildd work happens on some variation of development boards, usually due to increased memory and hard disk requirements than the intended market audience. This often implies that the kernel shipped with Debian won t be usable on our own debian.org machines. This makes keeping up with security and other kernel fixes way more error prone and time intensive. We keep annoying the right people in Debian to add kernel flavors that actually boot on our machines, and things are getting better, so maybe in the future this will no longer be a problem. Raphael: If you could spend all your time on Debian, what would you work on? Peter: One of the things that I think is a bit annoying for admins that maintain machines all over the globe is mirror selection. I shouldn t have to care where my packages come from, apt-get should just fetch them from a mirror, any mirror, that is close by, fast and recent. I don t need to know which one it was. We have deployed geodns for security.debian.org a while ago, and it seems to work quite well for the coarse granularity we desired for that setup, but geodns is an ugly hack (I think it is a layer violation), it might not scale to hundreds or thousands of mirrors, and it doesn t play well with DNSSEC. What I d really like to see is Debian support apt s mirror method that I think (and I apologize if I m wronging somebody) Michael Vogt implemented recently. The basic idea is that you simply add deb mirror://mirror.debian.org/ or something like that to your sources.list, and apt goes and asks that server for a list of mirrors it should use right now. The client code exists, but I don t know how well tested it is. What is missing is the server part. One that gives clients a mirror, or list of mirrors, that are close to them, current, and carry their architecture. It s probably not a huge amount of work, but at the same time it s also not entirely trivial. If I had more time on my hands this is something that I d try to do. Hopefully somebody will pick it up. Raphael: What motivates you to continue to contribute year after year? Peter: It s fun, mostly. Sure, there are things that need to be done regularly that are boring or become so after a while, but as a sysadmin you tend to do things once or twice and then seek to automate it. DSA s users, i.e. DDs, constantly want to play with new services or approaches to make Debian better and often they need our support or help in their endeavors. So that s a constant flow of interesting challenges. Another reason is that Debian is simply where some of my friends are. Working on Debian with them is interacting with friends. I not only use Debian at debian.org. I use it at work, I use it on my own machines, on the servers of the Tor project. When I was with OFTC Debian is what we put on our machines. Being a part of Debian is one way to ensure what Debian releases is actually usable to me, professionally and with other projects. Raphael: Is there someone in Debian that you admire for their contributions? Peter: That s a hard one. There are certainly people who I respect greatly for their technical or other contributions to Debian, but I don t want to single anybody out in particular. I think we all, everyone who ever contributed to Debian with code, support or a bug report, can be very proud of what we are producing one of the best operating systems out there.
Thank you to Peter for the time spent answering my questions. I hope you enjoyed reading his answers as I did. Subscribe to my newsletter to get my monthly summary of the Debian/Ubuntu news and to not miss further interviews. You can also follow along on Identi.ca, Twitter and Facebook.

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15 June 2011

Christian Perrier: So, what happened with Kikithon?

I mentioned this briefly yesterday, but now I'll try to summarize the story of a great surprise and a big moment for me. All this started when my wife Elizabeth and my son Jean-Baptiste wanted to do something special for my 50th birthday. So, it indeed all started months ago, probably early March or something (I don't yet have all the details). Jean-Baptiste described this well on the web site, so I won't go again into details, but basically, this was about getting birthday wishes from my "free software family" in, as you might guess, as many languages as possible. Elizabeth brought the original idea and JB helped her by setting up the website and collecting e-mail addresses of people I usually work with: he grabbed addresses from PO files on Debian website, plus some in his own set of GPG signatures and here we go. And then he started poking dozens of you folks in order to get your wishes for this birthday. Gradually, contributions accumulated on the website, with many challenges for them: be sure to get as many people as possible, poking and re-poking all those FLOSS people who keep forgetting things... It seems that poking people is something that's probably in the Perrier's genes! And they were doing all this without me noticing. As usually in Debian, releasing on time is a no-no. So, it quickly turned out that having everything ready by April 2nd wouldn't be possible. So, their new goal was offering this to me on Pentecost Sunday, which was yesterday. And...here comes the gift. Aha, this looks like a photo album. Could it be a "50 years of Christian" album? But, EH, why is that pic of me, with the red Debconf5 tee-shirt (that features a world map) and a "bubulle" sign, in front of the book? But, EH EH EH, what the .... are doing these word by H0lger, then Fil, then Joey doing on the following pages? And only then, OMG, I discover the real gift they prepared. 106, often bilingual, wishes from 110 people (some were couples!). 18 postcards (one made of wood). 45 languages. One postcard with wishes from nearly every distro representatives at LinuxTag 2011. Dozens of photos from my friends all around the world. All this in a wonderful album. I can't tell what I said. Anyway, JB was shooting a video, so...we'll see. OK, I didn't cry...but it wasn't that far and emotion was really really intense. Guys, ladies, gentlemen, friends....it took me a while to realize what you contributed to. It took me the entire afternoon to realize the investment put by Elizabeth and JB (and JB's sisters support) into this. Yes, as many of you wrote, I have an awesome family and they really know how to share their love. I also have an awesome virtual family all around the world. Your words are wholeheartedly appreciated and some were indeed much much much appreciated. Of course, I'll have the book in Banja Luka so that you can see the result. I know (because JB and Elizabeth told me) that many of you were really awaiting to see how it would be received (yes, that includes you, in Germany, who I visited in early May!!!). Again, thank you so much for this incredible gift. Thank you Holger Levsen, Phil Hands, Joey Hess, Lior Kaplan, Martin Michlmayr, Alberto Gonzalez Iniesta, Kenshi "best friend" Muto, Praveen Arimbrathodiyil, Felipe Augusto van de Wiel, Ana Carolina Comandulli (5 postcards!), Stefano Zacchiroli (1st contribution received by JB, of course), Gunnar Wolf, Enriiiiiico Zini, Clytie Siddall, Frans Pop (by way of Clytie), Tenzin Dendup, Otavio Salvador, Neil McGovern, Konstantinos Margaritis, Luk Claes, Jonas Smedegaard, Pema Geyleg, Meike "sp tzle queen" Reichle, Alexander Reichle-Schmehl, Torsten Werner, "nette BSD" folks, CentOS Ralph and Brian, Fedora people, SUSE's Jan, Ubuntu's Lucia Tamara, Skolelinux' Paul, Rapha l Hertzog, Lars Wirzenius, Andrew McMillan (revenge in September!), Yasa Giridhar Appaji Nag (now I know my name in Telugu), Amaya Rodrigo, St phane Glondu, Martin Krafft, Jon "maddog" Hall (and God save the queen), Eddy Petri or, Daniel Nylander, Aiet Kolkhi, Andreas "die Katze geht in die K che, wunderbar" Tille, Paul "lets bend the elbow" Wise, Jordi "half-marathon in Banja Luka" Mallach, Steve "as ever-young as I am" Langasek, Obey Arthur Liu, YAMANE Hideki, Jaldhar H. Vyas, Vikram Vincent, Margarita "Bronx cross-country queen" Manterola, Patty Langasek, Aigars Mahinovs (finding a pic *with* you on it is tricky!), Thepittak Karoonboonyanan, Javier "nobody expects the Spanish inquisition" Fern ndez-Sanguino, Varun Hiremath, Moray Allan, David Moreno Garza, Ralf "marathon-man" Treinen, Arief S Fitrianto, Penny Leach, Adam D. Barrat, Wolfgang Martin Borgert, Christine "the mentee overtakes the mentor" Spang, Arjuna Rao Chevala, Gerfried "my best contradictor" Fuchs, Stefano Canepa, Samuel Thibault, Eloy "first samba maintainer" Par s, Josip Rodin, Daniel Kahn Gillmor, Steve McIntyre, Guntupalli Karunakar, Jano Gulja , Karolina Kali , Ben Hutchings, Matej Kova i , Khoem Sokhem, Lisandro "I have the longest name in this list" Dami n Nicanor P rez-Meyer, Amanpreet Singh Alam, H ctor Or n, Hans Nordhaugn, Ivan Mas r, Dr. Tirumurti Vasudevan, John "yes, Kansas is as flat as you can imagine" Goerzen, Jean-Baptiste "Piwet" Perrier, Elizabeth "I love you" Perrier, Peter Eisentraut, Jesus "enemy by nature" Climent, Peter Palfrader, Vasudev Kamath, Miroslav "Chicky" Ku e, Mart n Ferrari, Ollivier Robert, Jure uhalev, Yunqiang Su, Jonathan McDowell, Sampada Nakhare, Nayan Nakhare, Dirk "rendez-vous for Chicago marathon" Eddelbuettel, Elian Myftiu, Tim Retout, Giuseppe Sacco, Changwoo Ryu, Pedro Ribeoro, Miguel "oh no, not him again" Figueiredo, Ana Guerrero, Aur lien Jarno, Kumar Appaiah, Arangel Angov, Faidon Liambotis, Mehdi Dogguy, Andrew Lee, Russ Allbery, Bj rn Steensrud, Mathieu Parent, Davide Viti, Steinar H. Gunderson, Kurt Gramlich, Vanja Cvelbar, Adam Conrad, Armi Be irovi , Nattie Mayer-Hutchings, Joerg "dis shuld be REJECTed" Jaspert and Luca Capello. Let's say it gain:

13 June 2011

Christian Perrier: So, what happened with Kikithon?

I mentioned this briefly yesterday, but now I'll try to summarize the story of a great surprise and a big moment for me. All this started when my wife Elizabeth and my son Jean-Baptiste wanted to do something special for my 50th birthday. So, it indeed all started months ago, probably early March or something (I don't yet have all the details). Jean-Baptiste described this well on the web site, so I won't go again into details, but basically, this was about getting birthday wishes from my "free software family" in, as you might guess, as many languages as possible. Elizabeth brought the original idea and JB helped her by setting up the website and collecting e-mail addresses of people I usually work with: he grabbed addresses from PO files on Debian website, plus some in his own set of GPG signatures and here we go. And then he started poking dozens of you folks in order to get your wishes for this birthday. Gradually, contributions accumulated on the website, with many challenges for them: be sure to get as many people as possible, poking and re-poking all those FLOSS people who keep forgetting things... It seems that poking people is something that's probably in the Perrier's genes! And they were doing all this without me noticing. As usually in Debian, releasing on time is a no-no. So, it quickly turned out that having everything ready by April 2nd wouldn't be possible. So, their new goal was offering this to me on Pentecost Sunday, which was yesterday. And...here comes the gift. Aha, this looks like a photo album. Could it be a "50 years of Christian" album? But, EH, why is that pic of me, with the red Debconf5 tee-shirt (that features a world map) and a "bubulle" sign, in front of the book? But, EH EH EH, what the .... are doing these word by H0lger, then Fil, then Joey doing on the following pages? And only then, OMG, I discover the real gift they prepared. 106, often bilingual, wishes from 110 people (some were couples!). 18 postcards (one made of wood). 45 languages. One postcard with wishes from nearly every distro representatives at LinuxTag 2011. Dozens of photos from my friends all around the world. All this in a wonderful album. I can't tell what I said. Anyway, JB was shooting a video, so...we'll see. OK, I didn't cry...but it wasn't that far and emotion was really really intense. Guys, ladies, gentlemen, friends....it took me a while to realize what you contributed to. It took me the entire afternoon to realize the investment put by Elizabeth and JB (and JB's sisters support) into this. Yes, as many of you wrote, I have an awesome family and they really know how to share their love. I also have an awesome virtual family all around the world. Your words are wholeheartedly appreciated and some were indeed much much much appreciated. Of course, I'll have the book in Banja Luka so that you can see the result. I know (because JB and Elizabeth told me) that many of you were really awaiting to see how it would be received (yes, that includes you, in Germany, who I visited in early May!!!). Again, thank you so much for this incredible gift. Thank you Holger Levsen, Phil Hands, Joey Hess, Lior Kaplan, Martin Michlmayr, Alberto Gonzalez Iniesta, Kenshi "best friend" Muto, Praveen Arimbrathodiyil, Felipe Augusto van de Wiel, Ana Carolina Comandulli (5 postcards!), Stefano Zacchiroli (1st contribution received by JB, of course), Gunnar Wolf, Enriiiiiico Zini, Clytie Siddall, Frans Pop (by way of Clytie), Tenzin Dendup, Otavio Salvador, Neil McGovern, Konstantinos Margaritis, Luk Claes, Jonas Smedegaard, Pema Geyleg, Meike "sp tzle queen" Reichle, Alexander Reichle-Schmehl, Torsten Werner, "nette BSD" folks, CentOS Ralph and Brian, Fedora people, SUSE's Jan, Ubuntu's Lucia Tamara, Skolelinux' Paul, Rapha l Hertzog, Lars Wirzenius, Andrew McMillan (revenge in September!), Yasa Giridhar Appaji Nag (now I know my name in Telugu), Amaya Rodrigo, St phane Glondu, Martin Krafft, Jon "maddog" Hall (and God save the queen), Eddy Petri or, Daniel Nylander, Aiet Kolkhi, Andreas "die Katze geht in die K che, wunderbar" Tille, Paul "lets bend the elbow" Wise, Jordi "half-marathon in Banja Luka" Mallach, Steve "as ever-young as I am" Langasek, Obey Arthur Liu, YAMANE Hideki, Jaldhar H. Vyas, Vikram Vincent, Margarita "Bronx cross-country queen" Manterola, Patty Langasek, Aigars Mahinovs (finding a pic *with* you on it is tricky!), Thepittak Karoonboonyanan, Javier "nobody expects the Spanish inquisition" Fern ndez-Sanguino, Varun Hiremath, Moray Allan, David Moreno Garza, Ralf "marathon-man" Treinen, Arief S Fitrianto, Penny Leach, Adam D. Barrat, Wolfgang Martin Borgert, Christine "the mentee overtakes the mentor" Spang, Arjuna Rao Chevala, Gerfried "my best contradictor" Fuchs, Stefano Canepa, Samuel Thibault, Eloy "first samba maintainer" Par s, Josip Rodin, Daniel Kahn Gillmor, Steve McIntyre, Guntupalli Karunakar, Jano Gulja , Karolina Kali , Ben Hutchings, Matej Kova i , Khoem Sokhem, Lisandro "I have the longest name in this list" Dami n Nicanor P rez-Meyer, Amanpreet Singh Alam, H ctor Or n, Hans Nordhaugn, Ivan Mas r, Dr. Tirumurti Vasudevan, John "yes, Kansas is as flat as you can imagine" Goerzen, Jean-Baptiste "Piwet" Perrier, Elizabeth "I love you" Perrier, Peter Eisentraut, Jesus "enemy by nature" Climent, Peter Palfrader, Vasudev Kamath, Miroslav "Chicky" Ku e, Mart n Ferrari, Ollivier Robert, Jure uhalev, Yunqiang Su, Jonathan McDowell, Sampada Nakhare, Nayan Nakhare, Dirk "rendez-vous for Chicago marathon" Eddelbuettel, Elian Myftiu, Tim Retout, Giuseppe Sacco, Changwoo Ryu, Pedro Ribeoro, Miguel "oh no, not him again" Figueiredo, Ana Guerrero, Aur lien Jarno, Kumar Appaiah, Arangel Angov, Faidon Liambotis, Mehdi Dogguy, Andrew Lee, Russ Allbery, Bj rn Steensrud, Mathieu Parent, Davide Viti, Steinar H. Gunderson, Kurt Gramlich, Vanja Cvelbar, Adam Conrad, Armi Be irovi , Nattie Mayer-Hutchings, Joerg "dis shuld be REJECTed" Jaspert and Luca Capello. Let's say it gain:

05 December 2008

Martin F. Krafft: Symbian, IPv6, SIP: lack of testing, no QA, no surprise

Trying to put my new Nokia E71 to use, I was positively surprised to see that it has an IPv6 stack. Even though the integrated web browser does not care about it and insists on IPv4, it still made me happy to realise that Symbian (manufacturers of the OS) aren t totally missing the beat of time. But when I tried to get the builtin SIP client to speak to my Asterisk PBX, I ran my head against a wall. It didn t take me long to find out why it wasn t working, though:
<--- SIP read from 192.168.14.62:5060 --->
INVITE sip:echo@sip.madduck.net SIP/2.0
Route: <sip:sip.madduck.net;lr>
Via: SIP/2.0/UDP [2001:41e0:ff12::xyy:zzff:feaa:bbcc]:5060;branch=[...]
From: <sip:e71@madduck.net>;tag=i4a43mn949hc7vu5633b
To: <sip:echo@sip.madduck.net>
Contact: <sip:e71@[2001:41e0:ff12::xyy:zzff:feaa:bbcc]>
[...]
User-Agent: E71-1 RM-346 110.07.127
[...]
o=Nokia-SIPUA 63396745194593125 63396745194593125 IN IP6 2001:41e0:[...]

This is Asterisk s debug dump of the SIP INVITE packet, which initiates a connection. You will note that it arrives via IPv4, since Asterisk does not speak IPv6 and thus doesn t listen on IPv6. You will also notice that the Nokia phone doesn t give a flying food, but puts its IPv6 address into the headers. That s like writing a letter to your grandmother and telling her to answer by e-mail. You can choose between IPv4 and IPv6 for GPRS connections, but not for Wifi. There is also no way to turn off IPv6 altogether, at least none that I found. This really makes me wonder about the development process at Symbian, which must exclude testing and QA, or else I could not explain how such braindeadness could make it into a published product. On the other hand, we are all well aware of the lack of quality in software products that come force-bundled with hardware, like phones or plain computers. After Nokia acquired Symbian, they open-sourced the operating system (thanks, Penny, awesome girlfriend, for reminding me. Happy now? grin). After a bit of searching, I am pretty convinced that this was just marketing buzz, because I failed to find any information on how to obtain the code or how to put it onto the phone, six months later. I am not sure how to move on. I can either return the phone (wouldn t be the first time I had to return a Nokia E series phone for lack of quality), switch from Asterisk to some IPv6-enabled VoIP software (like FreeSwitch, which has not been packaged for Debian yet, mostly because the FreeSwitch guys are acting up about the changes Debianisation would require), or find some hack around this limitation. Ah, the joys of being an early adopter NP: Neil Young: On the Beach Update: Faidon Liambotis, who was also influential in my decision for the E71, found the problem: the phone s DNS cache. sip.madduck.net used to be a CNAME pointer to the machine running the asterisk server, wall.oerlikon.madduck.net, which also has an AAAA (IPv6) record. I thought about this myself and removed it, but the problem persisted. Faidon suggested to use the IP instead, which worked, and a reboot of the phone cleared the cache and allowed me to use the DNS name again, which is now a plain A record to the same host. As soon as DNS no longer advertises the IPv6 address, the phone s SIP stack no longer gets confused.

26 July 2008

Philipp Kern: Stable Point Release: Etch 4.0r4 (aka etchnhalf)

Another point release for Etch has been done; now it's the time for the CD team to roll out new images after the next mirror pulse. The official announcements (prepared by Alexander Reichle-Schmehl, thanks!) will follow shortly afterwards. FTP master of the day was Joerg Jaspert, who did his first point release since Woody, as he told us on IRC. We appreciate your work and you spending your time that shortly before going to Argentina. This point release includes the etchnhalf update introducing a new kernel image (based on 2.6.24) and some driver updates. Additionally the infamous openssl hole will be fixed for good, even for new installs. Again I want to present you a list of people who contributed to this release. It cannot be complete as I got the information out of the Changed-by fields of the uploads. From the Release Team we had dann frazier (who drove the important kernel part of etchnhalf), Luk Claes, Neil McGovern, Andreas Barth, Martin Zobel-Helas and me working on it. ;-)

24 March 2008

Andreas Barth: apache, ldap and using different attributes as user names

I'm currently considering how to allow users to log on with different attributes as user names, e.g. with their "real" user name or their mail adress. Unfortunatly as described on http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2/mod/mod_authnz_ldap.html#authldapurl, though RFC 2255 allows a comma-separated list, only the first attribute is used. Now, of course an idea would be to specify all different attributes as a new "loginas"-type one. Another solution would be to use ldap overlay modules, and just convert them "on the fly". Better ideas would be welcome. Update: Thanks to Faidon Liambotis (again!) one can probably use mod_authn_alias to combine authentication with user name, mail adress etc.

16 March 2008

Andreas Barth: semantics in ldap - anyone out there?

Ldap seems like a good database to store accounts in: Lots of tools can use it, it's easily integrated into pam, and lots more. But one sometimes just hits borders in the data model of openldap: There are no semantics available. So, let me give you an example. Take e.g. the dnsZoneEntry attribute in the debian.org-ldap. Actually, one wants to allow anyone to write into that attribute in his own entry. But - and that's a big but - one wants to have two additional checks before writing: One is that one cannot claim any dns entry already used by someone else. And the other is that the format needs to comply to specific standards. Now the question is, is there some way to use ldap with more semantics? Or does one need to write ones own backend to do that (and in all the non-plain-db*-backends, it is specified that one needs to write his own authorization code as well). Or some other recommended way to do that? (Or is the only existing incarnation of that ActiveDirectory?) Update: Thanks to Faidon Liambotis I know now about the overlays in openldap. The standard overlays unique and constraint will probably solve the case above - of course, I have a few more complex cases, but that are at least good starters.

29 November 2007

Ond&#345;ej &#268;ert&iacute;k: Debian meeting in Merida, Spain

Right now, some Debian Developers (and also not yet Developers, like me:), are on
the work sessions in Extremadura, I am on the QA and release teams meeting.

We started in the morning with presentations (see also the schedule). Any comments and suggestions welcomed, please add comments below the post.

Lucas Nussbaum presenting:


Most of us:



And in details, names from left to right. Cyril Brulebois, Gon ri Le Bouder:


Luk Claes, Marc 'HE' Brockschmidt, J rg Jaspert, Lars Wirzenius:


Fabio Tranchitella, Bernd Zeimetz, Mario Iseli, Luk Claes:


Filippo Giunchedi, Stefano Zacchiroli, Tzafrir Cohen, Simon Richter, Faidon Liambotis:


And again, so that Faidon is visible:

05 October 2007

Joey Hess: pristine-tar now supporting .tar.gz

Thanks to Faidon Liambotis, pristine-tar has been extended to support recreating pristine gz files, as well as tar files. It's been tested against the entire corpus of .tar.gz files in the debian archive, and succeeds on 98.7% of them. We're using the whole archive as a test suite for pristine-tar, which is such a nice change -- excellent test coverange, and no need to write tests. :-) I've put up all the deltas it generated during its most recent run at http://hydra.kitenet.net/~joey/tmp/tar/. The deltas for all the tarballs in the archive use only 175 mb of space. The next step, once it gets out of incoming will be for tools that inject sources into revision control to get support for generating pristine-tar deltas and checking the deltas in too. And for tools that build packages from revision control to get support for using the deltas to reproduce the original tarball. If you maintain such a tool, I'm happy to help you do that. how pristine-gz works Recreating gz files is tricky, since you generally can't binary diff them as pristine-tar does with tar files. Instead, gzip has to be fed exactly the same conditions that applied when the original gz file was created. This includes time stamps, filenames, file content, and compression level. These are figured out by looking at the header of the gz file. But that's only the easy part, because there's a lot of variation in gz creation programs. The debian archive contains gz files produced on BSD systems by a libz based compressor, other built on MS-DOS, Windows NT, and many other strange and often buggy things. All of these differences result in different gz files. To deal with this, pristine-gz uses a gz creator that can reproduce any of the known variants on demand, and just tries different varients until it finds a match. There are still 132 files that it fails to reproduce, so if this sounds interesting to you, you can try to figure out how they were created and add support for them. It would be possible to make pristine-gz succeed even for gz files it can't reproduce. It could just generate xdeltas to the files it tries, and store the smallest one. I am undecided if that would be a good idea, since the delta wouldn't be very small.

22 July 2006

Steve Kemp: I almost believe that the pictures are all I can feel

Thanks to Faidon Liambotis for his nice patch, and Javier Fernandez-Sanguino Pen~a for accepting it we now have a cron which will no longer execute core files. Another small step towards improving security in Debian GNU/Linux!