Search Results: "Dirk Eddelbuettel"

27 January 2022

Dirk Eddelbuettel: td 0.0.6 on CRAN: Minor Bugfix

The td package for accessing the twelvedata API for financial data has been updated once more on CRAN and is now at version 0.0.6. The release comes in response to an email from CRAN who noticed (via r-devel) that I was sloppy (in one spot, it turns out) with a logical expression resulting in an expression of length greather than one. Fixed by wrapping an all() around it and the package was back at CRAN minutes later thanks to automated processing over their end. The NEWS entry follows.

Changes in version 0.0.6 (2022-01-26)
  • Correct one equality comparison by wrapping in all() to ensure a length-one logical expression is created

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a comparison to the previous release. For questions or comments use the issue tracker off the GitHub repo. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

25 January 2022

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppArmadillo 0.10.8.1.0 on CRAN: Upstream Updates

armadillo image Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language and is widely used by (currently) 950 other packages on CRAN, downloaded over 22.9 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN), and the CSDA paper (preprint/vignette) by Conrad and myself has been cited 451 times according to Google Scholar. This release brings another upstream update 10.8.0, and first bug fix release 10.8.1. As updates by Conrad can come a little quicker than the desired monthly cadence CRAN aims for, we skipped the 10.8.0 release for CRAN only but of course generally provide them via the Rcpp drat repo as well as via general updates to the repo, and full reverse dependency testing (for which results are always logged here). The full set of changes (since the last CRAN release 0.10.7.5.0) follows.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.10.8.1.0 (2022-01-23)
  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 10.8.1 (Realm Raider)
    • fix interaction between OpenBLAS and LAPACK
    • emit warning if find() is incorrectly used to locate NaN elements

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.10.8.0.0 (2022-01-02)
  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 10.8 (Realm Raider)
    • faster handling of symmetric matrices by pinv() and rank()
    • faster handling of diagonal matrices by inv_sympd(), pinv(), rank()
    • expanded norm() to handle integer vectors and matrices
    • added datum::tau to replace 2

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

22 January 2022

Dirk Eddelbuettel: qlcal 0.0.2 on CRAN: Updates

The second release of the still fairly new qlcal package arrivied at CRAN today. qlcal is based on the calendaring subset of QuantLib. It is provided (for the R package) as a set of included files, so the package is self-contained and does not depend on an external QuantLib library (which can be demanding to build). qlcal covers over sixty country / market calendars and can compute holiday lists, its complement (i.e. business day lists) and much more. This release brings a further package simplification from removing a few more files not needed for just calendaring, as well as an update 2022 calendar for China from the just-release 1.25 version of QuantLib.

Changes in version 0.0.2 (2022-01-21)
  • Further minimize set of files needed for calendaring
  • Update China calendar from QuantLib 1.25 release

See the project page and package documentation for more details, and more examples. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

20 January 2022

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RQuantLib 0.4.15: Regular Update

A new release 0.4.15 of RQuantLib arrived at CRAN earlier today, and has been uploaded to Debian as well. QuantLib is a very comprehensice free/open-source library for quantitative finance; RQuantLib connects it to the R environment and language. The release of RQuantLib comes four months after the previous release, and brings a momitor update for the just-released QuantLib 1.2.5 version along with a few small cleanups to calendars and daycounters.

Changes in RQuantLib version 0.4.15 (2022-01-19)
  • Changes in RQuantLib code:
    • Calendar support has been updated and completed to current QuantLib standards (Dirk in #161)
    • More daycounters have been added (Kai Lin in #163 fixing #162, #164)
    • The bonds pricers were update to changes in QuantLib 1.25 (Dirk)
  • Changes in RQuantLib package and setup:
    • Some package metadata was removed from the README.md (Dirk)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the this release. As always, more detailed information is on the RQuantLib page. Questions, comments etc should go to the new rquantlib-devel mailing list. Issue tickets can be filed at the GitHub repo. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

14 January 2022

Dirk Eddelbuettel: Rcpp 1.0.8: Updated, Strict Headers

rcpp logo The Rcpp team is thrilled to share the news of the newest release 1.0.8 of Rcpp which hit CRAN today, and has already been uploaded to Debian as well. Windows and macOS builds should appear at CRAN in the next few days. This release continues with the six-months cycle started with release 1.0.5 in July 2020. As a reminder, interim dev or rc releases will alwasys be available in the Rcpp drat repo; this cycle there were once again seven (!!) times two as we also tested the modified header (more below). These rolling release tend to work just as well, and are also fully tested against all reverse-dependencies. Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing R with C or C++ code. Right now, around 2478 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further, along with 242 in BioConductor. This release finally brings a change we have worked on quite a bit over the last few months. The idea of enforcing the setting of STRICT_R_HEADERS was prososed years ago in 2016 and again in 2018. But making such a chance against a widely-deployed code base has repurcussions, and we were not ready then. Last April, this was revisited in issue #1158. Over the course of numerous lengthy runs of tests of a changed Rcpp package against (essentially) all reverse-dependencies (i.e. packages which use Rcpp) we identified ninetyfour packages in total which needed a change. We provided either a patch we emailed, or a GitHub pull request, to all ninetyfour. And we are happy to say that eighty cases were resolved via a new CRAN upload, with a seven more having merged the pull request but not yet uploaded. Hence, we could make the case to CRAN (who were always CC ed on the monthly nag emails we sent to maintainers of packages needing a change) that an upload was warranted. And after a brief period for their checks and inspection, our January 11 release of Rcpp 1.0.8 arrived on CRAN on January 13. So with that, a big and heartfelt Thank You! to all eighty maintainers for updating their packages to permit this change at the Rcpp end, to CRAN for the extra checking, and to everybody else who I bugged with the numerous emails and updated to the seemingly never-ending issue #1158. We all got this done, and that is a Good Thing (TM). Other than the aforementioned change which will not automatically set STRICT_R_HEADERS (unless opted out which one can), a number of nice pull request by a number of contributors are included in this release: The full list of details follows.

Changes in Rcpp release version 1.0.8 (2022-01-11)
  • Changes in Rcpp API:
    • STRICT_R_HEADERS is now enabled by default, see extensive discussion in #1158 closing #898.
    • A new #define allows default setting of finalizer calls for external pointers (I aki in #1180 closing #1108).
    • Rcpp:::CxxFlags() now quotes the include path generated, (Kevin in #1189 closing #1188).
    • New header files Rcpp/Light, Rcpp/Lighter, Rcpp/Lightest and default Rcpp/Rcpp for fine-grained access to features (and compilation time) (Dirk #1191 addressing #1168).
  • Changes in Rcpp Attributes:
    • A new option signature allows customization of function signatures (Travers Ching in #1184 and #1187 fixing #1182)
  • Changes in Rcpp Documentation:
    • The Rcpp FAQ has a new entry on how not to grow a vector (Dirk in #1167).
    • Some long-spurious calls to RNGSope have been removed from examples (Dirk in #1173 closing #1172).
    • DOI reference in the bibtex files have been updated per JSS request (Dirk in #1186).
  • Changes in Rcpp Deployment:
    • Some continuous integration components have been updated (Dirk in #1174, #1181, and #1190).

Thanks to my CRANberries, you can also look at a diff to the previous release. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page. Bugs reports are welcome at the GitHub issue tracker as well (where one can also search among open or closed issues); questions are also welcome under rcpp tag at StackOverflow which also allows searching among the (currently) 2822 previous questions. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

9 January 2022

Dirk Eddelbuettel: Rblpapi 0.3.13: Some Fixes and Documentation

A new version, now at 0.3.13, of the Rblpapi package just arrived at CRAN. Rblpapi provides a direct interface between R and the Bloomberg Terminal via the C++ API provided by Bloomberg (but note that a valid Bloomberg license and installation is required). This is the thirteenth release since the package first appeared on CRAN in 2016. It comprises the PRs from three different contributors (with special thanks once again to Michael Kerber), and extends test and documentation, and extends two function interfaces to control explicitly whether returned lists of length one should be simplified. The list of changes follow below.

Changes in Rblpapi version 0.3.13 (2022-01-09)
  • Add a test for bds (Michael Kerber in #352)
  • Add simplify argument (and option) to bdh and bds (Dirk in #354 closing #353, #351)
  • Improve documentation for bsearch (John in #357 closing #356)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the this release. As always, more detailed information is on the Rblpapi page. Questions, comments etc should go to the issue tickets system at the GitHub repo. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

20 December 2021

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppSMC 0.2.6 on CRAN: Compiler Update

A new maintenance RcppSMC release 0.2.6 arrived at CRAN yesterday. It chiefly updates the code to comply with g++-11 which default to C++17 which brings us std::data(). And if one is not careful, as we weren t in three files, this can clash with other uses of data as I tweeted a good week ago. Otherwise some JSS URLs now sport the preferred shorter doi form. RcppSMC provides Rcpp-based bindings to R for the Sequential Monte Carlo Template Classes (SMCTC) by Adam Johansen described in his JSS article. Sequential Monte Carlo is also referred to as Particle Filter in some contexts. The package features the Google Summer of Code work by Leah South in 2017, and by Ilya Zarubin in 2021. This release is summarized below.

Changes in RcppSMC version 0.2.6 (2021-12-17)
  • Updated URLs to JSS for the new DOI scheme upon their request
  • Adjusted three source files for C++17 compilation under g++-11

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report for this release. More information is on the RcppSMC page. Issues and bugreports should go to the GitHub issue tracker. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

17 December 2021

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppArmadillo 0.10.7.5.0 on CRAN: Bugfixes

armadillo image Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language and is widely used by (currently) 937 other packages on CRAN, and downloaded over 22 million times (per the partial logs from the cloud mirrors of CRAN). This release brings another bug fix release 10.7.5 by Conrad in the long-term support 10.7.* series we started with 0.10.7.0 on September 30. As the bug fixes can come a little quicker than the desired monthly cadence CRAN aims for, we skipped a few of those release for CRAN only but of course still provide them via the Rcpp drat repo. The full set of changes (since the last CRAN release 0.10.7.3.0) follows. It includes the nice fixes to the fields type mentioned right after the last release.

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.10.7.5.0 (2021-12-16)
  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 10.7.5
    • fix aliasing bug in diagmat()
    • fix detection of 2x2 triangular matrices

Changes in RcppArmadillo version 0.10.7.4.0 (2021-11-23)
  • Upgraded to Armadillo release 10.7.4
    • faster handling of diagonal matrices by inv_sympd(), pinv(), rank()
    • more robust detection of incorrect data format by .load()
  • Correct dimensions setting in import/export of arma::field types, protected by #define (Jonathan Berrisch in #352 fixing #351)
  • Add unit tests for fields both with and without new #define (Dirk)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to previous release. More detailed information is on the RcppArmadillo page. Questions, comments etc should go to the rcpp-devel mailing list off the R-Forge page. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

16 December 2021

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RProtoBuf 0.4.18: Multiple Updates

A new release 0.4.18 of RProtoBuf arrived on CRAN earlier today. RProtoBuf provides R with bindings for the Google Protocol Buffers ( ProtoBuf ) data encoding and serialization library used and released by Google, and deployed very widely in numerous projects as a language and operating-system agnostic protocol. This release, the first since March of last year, contains two contributed pull requests improving or extending the package, some internal maintance updating the CI setup as well as retiring an old-yet-unused stub interface for RPC, as well as an update for UCRT builds on Windows. The following section from the NEWS.Rd file has more details.

Changes in RProtoBuf version 0.4.18 (2021-12-15)
  • Support string_view in FindMethodByName() (Adam Cozzette in #72).
  • CI use was updated first at Travis, later at GitHub and now uses r-ci (Dirk in #74 and (parts of) #76).
  • The (to the best of our knowledge) unused minimal RPC mechanism has been removed, retiring one method and one class as well as the import of the RCurl package (Dirk in #76).
  • The toJSON() method supports two (upstream) formatting toggles (Vitali Spinu in #79 with minor edit by Dirk).
  • Windows UCRT builds are now supported (Jeroen in #81, Dirk and Tomas Kalibera in #82).

Thanks to my CRANberries, there is a diff to the previous release. The RProtoBuf page has copies of the (older) package vignette, the quick overview vignette, and the pre-print of our JSS paper. Questions, comments etc should go to the GitHub issue tracker off the GitHub repo. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Dirk Eddelbuettel: BH 1.78.0-0: New Upstream, Two New Libraries

Boost Boost is a very large and comprehensive set of (peer-reviewed) libraries for the C++ programming language, containing well over 100 individual libraries. The BH package provides a sizeable subset of header-only libraries for (easier, no linking required) use by R. It is fairly widely used: the (partial) CRAN mirror logs (aggregated from the cloud mirrors) show over 28 million package downloads. Version 1.78.0 of Boost was released in a few days ago on their schedule with April, August and December releases. We follow these releases at a lower (annual) cadence, and BH 1.78.0-0 catches up to Boost 1.78 from the 1.75 version packaged last winter. Three reverse-depends checks revealed only minors needs for changes (after I corrected a fat-finger typo, whoops) in a handful of packages whose maintainers I contacted via PRs or emails. With that, CRAN permitted the upload yesterday. My thanks once again to the maintainers of these packages for helping it along promptly, and of course to the CRAN team. This release adds the new header-only library Boost Lambda2 offering simple but functional lambda functions (for C++14 and later), as well as Boost Process to manage system processes.

Changes in version 1.78.0-0 (2020-12-14)

Via my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to the previous release. Comments and suggestions about BH are welcome via the issue tracker at the GitHub repo. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Dirk Eddelbuettel: BH 1.78.0-0: New Upstream, Two New Libraries

Boost Boost is a very large and comprehensive set of (peer-reviewed) libraries for the C++ programming language, containing well over 100 individual libraries. The BH package provides a sizeable subset of header-only libraries for (easier, no linking required) use by R. It is fairly widely used: the (partial) CRAN mirror logs (aggregated from the cloud mirrors) show over 28 million package downloads. Version 1.78.0 of Boost was released in a few days ago on their schedule with April, August and December releases. We follow these releases at a lower (annual) cadence, and BH 1.78.0-0 catches up to Boost 1.78 from the 1.75 version packaged last winter. Three reverse-depends checks revealed only minors needs for changes (after I corrected a fat-finger typo, whoops) in a handful of packages whose maintainers I contacted via PRs or emails. With that, CRAN permitted the upload yesterday. My thanks once again to the maintainers of these packages for helping it along promptly, and of course to the CRAN team. This release adds the new header-only library Boost Lambda2 offering simple but functional lambda functions (for C++14 and later), as well as Boost Process to manage system processes.

Changes in version 1.78.0-0 (2020-12-14)

Via my CRANberries, there is a diffstat report relative to the previous release. Comments and suggestions about BH are welcome via the issue tracker at the GitHub repo. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

15 December 2021

Dirk Eddelbuettel: nanotime 0.3.5 on CRAN: Update

Another (minor) nanotime release, now at version 0.3.5, just arrived at CRAN. It follows the updates RDieHarder 0.2.3 and RcppCCTZ 0.2.10 earlier today in bringing a patch kindly prepared by Tomas Kalibera for the upcoming (and very useful) UCRT changes for Windows involving small build changes for the updated Windows toolchain. nanotime relies on the RcppCCTZ package for (efficient) high(er) resolution time parsing and formatting up to nanosecond resolution, and the bit64 package for the actual integer64 arithmetic. Initially implemented using the S3 system, it has benefitted greatly from a rigorous refactoring by Leonardo who not only rejigged nanotime internals in S4 but also added new S4 types for periods, intervals and durations. The NEWS snippet adds more details.

Changes in version 0.3.5 (2021-12-14)
  • Applied patch by Tomas Kalibera for Windows UCRT under the upcoming R 4.2.0 expected for April.

Thanks to my CRANberries there is also a diff to the previous version. More details and examples are at the nanotime page; code, issue tickets etc at the GitHub repository. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppCCTZ 0.2.10: Updates

A new release 0.2.10 of RcppCCTZ is now on CRAN. RcppCCTZ uses Rcpp to bring CCTZ to R. CCTZ is a C++ library for translating between absolute and civil times using the rules of a time zone. In fact, it is two libraries. One for dealing with civil time: human-readable dates and times, and one for converting between between absolute and civil times via time zones. And while CCTZ is made by Google(rs), it is not an official Google product. The RcppCCTZ page has a few usage examples and details. This package was the first CRAN package to use CCTZ; by now four others packages include its sources too. Not ideal, but beyond our control. This version switches to r-ci, and just like RDieHarder includes a patch kindly prepared by Tomas Kalibera for the upcoming (and very useful) UCRT changes for Windows involving small build changes for the updated Windows toolchain.

Changes in version 0.2.10 (2021-12-14)
  • Switch CI use to r-ci
  • Applied patch by Tomas Kalibera for Windows UCRT under the upcoming R 4.2.0 expected for April.

We also have a diff to the previous version thanks to my CRANberries. More details are at the RcppCCTZ page; code, issue tickets etc at the GitHub repository. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

14 December 2021

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RDieHarder 0.2.3 on CRAN: Packaging Updates

An new version 0.2.3 of the random-number generator tester RDieHarder (based on the DieHarder suite developed / maintained by Robert Brown with contributions by David Bauer and myself) is now on CRAN. This release comes only about one and half months after the previous release 0.2.2 and is once again related to R and CRAN changes. The upcoming (and very useful) UCRT changes for Windows involve small build changes for the updated Windows toolchain so this release includes a patch kindly prepared by Tomas Kalibera. And because compilers get cleverer and cleverer over time, I also address a warning and error found by the newest gcc in what is otherwise unchanged and years old C code In addition, two other warnings were fixed right after the previous release. Thanks to CRANberries, you can also look at the most recent diff. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

9 December 2021

Dirk Eddelbuettel: qlcal 0.0.1 on CRAN: New Package

A new package of mine arrived on CRAN yesterday in its inaugural 0.0.1 upload: qlcal. qlcal is based on the calendaring subset of QuantLib. It is provided (for the R package) as a set of included files, so the package is self-contained and does not depend on an external QuantLib library (which can be challenging to build). The only build requirements are Rcpp for the seamless R/C++ integration, and BH for Boost headers. qlcal covers over sixty country / market calendars and can compute holiday lists, its complement (i.e. business day lists) and much more. As a teaser see this two-liner for 2022 holiday for the Federal Reserve calendar in the United States, now including Juneteenth (on June 20 next year) as the most recently added holiday:
> library(qlcal)
> setCalendar("UnitedStates/FederalReserve")
> getHolidays(as.Date("2022-01-01"), as.Date("2022-12-31"))
 [1] "2022-01-17" "2022-02-21" "2022-05-30" "2022-06-20" "2022-07-04" "2022-09-05" "2022-10-10"
 [8] "2022-11-11" "2022-11-24" "2022-12-26"
> 
See the project page and package documentation for more details, and more examples. Going forward, and time permitting, it would be nice to slowly reduce the Boost dependency to make the underlying qlcal C++ library more self-sufficient. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

8 December 2021

Dirk Eddelbuettel: #34: Less Is More

Less Is More. Ludwig Mies van der Rohe
Welcome to the 34th post in the rambunctiously refreshing R recitations, or R4. Today s post is about architecture. Mies defined modernism. When still in Europe, I had been to the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin which provides a gorgeous space for the arts. Twenty-five years ago, I worked next to his Toronto-Dominion Center in Toronto. Here in Chicago we have numerous buildings: the Federal Center (the Dirksen, the Kluczynski and the US Post Office rounding out the square in the Loop), multiple buildings on the Illinois Tech (aka IIT) Campus where he taught in the architecture department he created and lead, the (formerly called) IBM Plaza building at the river and more. Structure and minimalism, often based on the same core elements of black steel beams and glass, are a landmark of these buildings. One immediately senses that there is nothing left to take away. Code and programming can be similar. We too compose based on parts we assemble and combine to create something hopefully larger than the parts. The difficulty arising from too many dependencies is something we discussed before both here in this 2018 post but also via the tinyverse site. Over the last seven days, and via uploads to new versions to CRAN, I have switched the vignettes of seven packages from using minidown (which in turn requires rmarkdown and knitr, plus their aggregate dependencies) to using simplermarkdown with its sole dependency. That is, of course, a personal choice. I tend to not even knit much in my vignettes (and simplermarkdown supports what I do) but to rely mostly on pandoc for code rendering. So I only need a small subset of the functionality provided, but I can not access just that as the default comes with numerous bells, whistles as well as enough other instruments to form a small marching band. A picture may express this better: (courtesy of the deepdep package for the figures). Which of these two setups is less likely to surprise you with random breaks, say in continuous integration? Which takes less time to install, and burns fewer cpu cycles just to be set up, each time we run a new test? Which is taxing your students, colleagues, collaborators, users, less on setup for use or replication? The first, comprises a total of 29 dependencies, or the second with just one? My money is on the second choice. Less is more.

7 December 2021

Dirk Eddelbuettel: Rblpapi 0.3.12: Fixes and Updates

The Rblp team is happy to announce a new version 0.3.12 of Rblpapi which just arrived at CRAN. Rblpapi provides a direct interface between R and the Bloomberg Terminal via the C++ API provided by Bloomberg (but note that a valid Bloomberg license and installation is required). This is the twelveth release since the package first appeared on CRAN in 2016. Changes are detailed below and include both extensions to functionality, actual bug fixes and changes to the package setup. Special thanks goes to Michael Kerber, Yihui Xie and Kai Lin for contributing pull requests!

Changes in Rblpapi version 0.3.12 (2021-12-07)
  • bdh() supports new option returnAs (Michael Kerber and Dirk in #335 fixing #206)
  • Remove extra backtick in vignette (Yihui Xie in #343)
  • Fix a segfault from bulk access with bds (Kai Lin in #347 fixing #253)
  • Support REQUEST_STATUS in bdh (Kai Lin and John in #349 fixing #348)
  • Vignette now uses simplermarkdown (Dirk in #350)

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for the this release. As always, more detailed information is on the Rblpapi page. Questions, comments etc should go to the issue tickets system at the GitHub repo. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

6 December 2021

Dirk Eddelbuettel: tidyCpp 0.0.6 on CRAN: Package Maintenance

Another small release of the tidyCpp package arrived on CRAN this morning. The packages offers a clean C++ layer (as well as one small C++ helper class) on top of the C API for R which aims to make use of this robust (if awkward) C API a little easier and more consistent. See the vignette for motivating examples. This release makes a tiny code change, remove a YAML file for the disgraced former continuous integration service we shall not name (yet that we all used to use). And just like digest five days ago, drat four days ago, littler three days ago, RcppAPT two days ago, and RcppSpdlog yesterday, we converted the vignettes from using the minidown package to the (fairly new) simplermarkdown package which is so much more appropriate for our use of the minimal water.css style. The NEWS entry follows.

Changes in tidyCpp version 0.0.6 (2021-12-06)
  • Assign nullptr in dtor for Protect class
  • Switch vignette engine to simplermarkdown

Thanks to my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release. For questions, suggestions, or issues please use the issue tracker at the GitHub repo. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

5 December 2021

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppSpdlog 0.0.7 on CRAN: Package Maintenance

A new version 0.0.7 of RcppSpdlog is now on CRAN. RcppSpdlog bundles spdlog, a wonderful header-only C++ logging library with all the bells and whistles you would want that was written by Gabi Melman, and also includes fmt by Victor Zverovich. This release brings upstream bugfix releases 1.9.1 and 1.9.2 of spdlog. We also removed the YAML file (and badge) for the disgraced former continuous integration service we shall not name (yet that we all used to use). And just like digest four days ago, drat three days ago, littler two days ago, and RcppAPT yesterday, we converted the vignettes from using the minidown package to the (fairly new) simplermarkdown package which is so much more appropriate for our use of the minimal water.css style. The (minimal) NEWS entry for this release follows.

Changes in RcppSpdlog version 0.0.7 (2021-12-05)
  • Upgraded to upstream bug fix releases spdlog 1.9.1 and 1.9.2
  • Travis artifacts and badges have been pruned
  • Vignette now uses simplermarkdown

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report. More detailed information is on the RcppSpdlog page, or the package documention site. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

4 December 2021

Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppAPT 0.0.8: Package Maintenance

A new version of the RcppAPT package interfacing from R to the C++ library behind the awesome apt, apt-get, apt-cache, commands and their cache powering Debian, Ubuntu and the like arrived on CRAN earlier today. RcppAPT allows you to query the (Debian or Ubuntu) package dependency graph at will, with build-dependencies (if you have deb-src entries), reverse dependencies, and all other goodies. See the vignette and examples for illustrations. This release updates some package metadata, adds a new package testing helper, and, just like digest three days ago, drat two days ago, and littler yesterday, we converted the vignettes from using the minidown package to the (fairly new) simplermarkdown package which is so much more appropriate for our use of the minimal water.css style.

Changes in version 0.0.8 (2021-12-04)
  • New test file version.R ensures NEWS file documents current package version
  • Travis artifacts and badges have been pruned
  • Vignettes now use simplermarkdown

Courtesy of my CRANberries, there is also a diffstat report for this release. A bit more information about the package is available here as well as as the GitHub repo. If you like this or other open-source work I do, you can now sponsor me at GitHub.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.

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